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InSight Surface Operations, 26 Nov 2018-
HSchirmer
post Dec 20 2018, 03:20 AM
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QUOTE (atomoid @ Dec 20 2018, 02:37 AM) *
i'm curious what the 'EDR' as well as the 'M' at the end represent.


Fairly sure EDR is "Experiment Data Record"
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MahFL
post Dec 20 2018, 03:53 AM
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QUOTE (atomoid @ Dec 20 2018, 03:37 AM) *
I never was able to get Cargo Cult's walkabout VR version of InSight's landing site working, just brings up a simple image, perhaps i need SteamVR equipment or something like that?


Yes you need VR equipment.
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Phil Stooke
post Dec 20 2018, 04:26 AM
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EDR, the Experiment Data Record, is the actual data from the spacecraft as received. It has not been calibrated, cleaned of noise or processed in any other way, and in the case of an image not map-projected (for instance, LRO Camera EDRs are often a mirror-image of the map-projected version, which causes new users no end of confusion). The original file for these InSight images is the EDR, and strictly speaking we are not getting that in the public release but it's what the science team have.

Phil


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... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
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PaulH51
post Dec 20 2018, 05:25 AM
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Sol 22, SEIS is on the ground
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nprev
post Dec 20 2018, 05:52 AM
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Congratulations to the team!!!!! Most significant mission milestone since touchdown!


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A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
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anticitizen2
post Dec 20 2018, 05:53 AM
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animation of the deployment. the tether looks blurred in the frame after it releases from the deck
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PaulH51
post Dec 20 2018, 06:26 AM
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My take on the SEIS deployment GIF, I added the timestamps and brightened each of the sol 22 frames a little.
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MahFL
post Dec 20 2018, 06:32 AM
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I thought the deployment would have been so much slower with stops at many locations to check things, looks like it was one smooth deployment movement.
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Phil Stooke
post Dec 20 2018, 07:30 AM
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I will just mention that I am working on a site map and will post it when I can.

Phil


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akuo
post Dec 20 2018, 07:40 AM
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Probably they figure that it is less risky to do the deployment in one (well practised) move, than leaving the instrument dangling on the tether for longer periods of time.

Congratulations to the team!


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Antti Kuosmanen
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PaulH51
post Dec 20 2018, 01:06 PM
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Seven Sol 23 images are down. The Grapple is still engaged on SEIS. Link to all Sol 23 images link
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stevesliva
post Dec 20 2018, 02:52 PM
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With instruments in the FOV, the dust on the camera really isn't as bad as it appeared with only dirt and gravel of the same hue in the FOV.

Also, it's funny to think back on this being called slow-ish. Seems like lightning speed!
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Explorer1
post Dec 20 2018, 03:01 PM
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Wonderful news! And if it seems fast, it did take a whole Martian day to do this.

Judging from the press release, the heat flow probe will go on the far right of the work space to have as much distance from SEIS as possible? Seems a bit more rocky on that side though...
EDIT: nevermind looks like it will be on the left, actually, judging by this (https://twitter.com/NASAInSight/status/1075559676069048320) C was the final spot for SEIS, so HP3 might go around the H area.
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Phil Stooke
post Dec 20 2018, 06:38 PM
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I think the A or E areas are what is intended, based on the rendered images of deployed instruments.

Phil



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James Sorenson
post Dec 20 2018, 07:19 PM
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Looking at the deployed Seismometer on the ground, one thing occurred to me. Wouldn't the flex-cable moving around in the wind impart some minor vibrations into the instrument? Are there any isolation mechanisms on the cable interface into the instrument that will help mitigate that?
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