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ROVER WHEELS: Monitoring changes over time, NOTE: Read back through the thread to avoid repeating misconceptions
elakdawalla
post May 20 2013, 03:57 AM
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OK, that was pretty funny. smile.gif


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djellison
post May 20 2013, 04:03 AM
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Yup - hats off to that one smile.gif
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MahFL
post May 20 2013, 11:54 AM
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QUOTE (mcaplinger @ May 19 2013, 03:18 AM) *
I'm not following your reasoning; the entire tire is one piece of aluminum, beefed up where the flexures attach.

Maybe the slide I referenced will be useful.


Actually you referenced slide 32, and it's slide 31, that threw me a bit, lol. smile.gif
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Keatah
post Oct 7 2013, 02:33 AM
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The MER and MSL builders got a lot of things right when they put them together. I'll assume they know what they're doing with the wheels.

Correct me if I'm wrong:
I understand the punctured aluminum is little more than soda can thickness and provides little or no structure strength.
I understand the cleats are considerably thicker and beefier and it is these that provide shape and strength.
I understand that the wheel motors are insanely high torque and could rotate the wheels if they were triangular shape.

I also assume that the wheels (initially with full undamaged surface area) would tend to float on dust and other lightly packed terrain. This I assume will change over time as the thin aluminum gets punched out and ripped up. Now you have less surface area, and the cleats will tend to sink more easily in sand. And at the same time, this digging-in would provide excellent traction. And perhaps even better traction when challenged against more rocky material.

Make no mistake, I was horrified to read about this! But if what I said is true, and I'm right, and the builders did their job, then there's nothing to worry over.

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pospa
post Oct 7 2013, 08:35 PM
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One question related to this topic, ... I hope.
As far as we know MER wheels are made of Aluminium 7075-T7351.
Could anybody confirm MSL wheels are the same alloy?
Thx.
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Gerald
post Oct 10 2013, 07:35 AM
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Sol 411 MAHLI x-eyed stereo showing part of a wheel:
Attached Image
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djellison
post Oct 10 2013, 01:32 PM
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QUOTE (Keatah @ Oct 6 2013, 07:33 PM) *
I also assume that the wheels (initially with full undamaged surface area) would tend to float on dust and other lightly packed terrain. This I assume will change over time as the thin aluminum gets punched out and ripped up....


Remember - the wheels were built with several large holes in them....that spell JPL in morse code.

They make little to no difference to traction or surface pressure. Remember - it's 899kg across 6 wheels each with basically the same surface contact patch. It wont change significantly with a few dings and dents in it.

However - your conclusion "the builders did their job, then there's nothing to worry over" is 100% accurate.
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xflare
post Oct 16 2013, 10:48 AM
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Another hole

http://www.midnightplanets.com/web/MSL/ima...CAM00354M_.html
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infocat13
post Oct 18 2013, 11:16 PM
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QUOTE (djellison @ Oct 10 2013, 09:32 AM) *
Remember - the wheels were built with several large holes in them....that spell JPL in morse code.

They make little to no difference to traction or surface pressure. Remember - it's 899kg across 6 wheels each with basically the same surface contact patch. It wont change significantly with a few dings and dents in it.

However - your conclusion "the builders did their job, then there's nothing to worry over" is 100% accurate.





I would love to see the machinery used to fabricate the wheels
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djellison
post Oct 19 2013, 01:42 AM
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Go to any aerospace grade machine shop.
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pospa
post Oct 19 2013, 08:24 AM
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Or visit directly Next Intent where they produced all MSL and MER wheels http://www.nextintent.com/portfolio-2.
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Gerald
post Nov 25 2013, 03:21 PM
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Sol 463 MAHLI x-eyed stereo of the left central wheel:
Attached Image

... and the left front wheel:
Attached Image
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elakdawalla
post Nov 25 2013, 04:29 PM
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Wow. ohmy.gif


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walfy
post Nov 25 2013, 05:13 PM
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The wheel for the glasses:

Attached Image
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Gerald
post Nov 28 2013, 12:53 PM
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Sol 469-471 Update On Curiosity From USGS Scientist Ken Herkenhoff: Tearing on Wheels
QUOTE
There was some concern about tears in the rover wheels, but today we got the go-ahead to drive, with no restrictions on distance or drive mode. The tears in the wheels were expected based on testing, and the wheels are designed to survive such damage without affecting mobility. ...
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