IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Comet Interceptor mission selected by ESA
ynyralmaen
post Jun 19 2019, 03:13 PM
Post #1


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 121
Joined: 18-July 05
Member No.: 438



Mission to a dynamically new comet or an interstellar object selected by ESA:

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Sc...tercept_a_comet

Team website:

http://www.cometinterceptor.space
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
stevesliva
post Jun 19 2019, 04:36 PM
Post #2


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1412
Joined: 14-October 05
From: Vermont
Member No.: 530



Hitches a ride to L2, waits there for a reachable target to be discovered by telescopic surveys on Earth. Target must not have visited the inner solar system before.

Neat.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
monty python
post Jun 20 2019, 06:19 AM
Post #3


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 174
Joined: 2-March 06
Member No.: 692



I love it too. Just wonder how you get any decent delta V on those small probes.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
monty python
post Jun 22 2019, 07:09 AM
Post #4


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 174
Joined: 2-March 06
Member No.: 692



According to spaceflightnow.com ESA thinks they will need up to five years to find the comet they want, and need it to be found 5 to 6 years before closest approach to the sun for the project to work.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
stevesliva
post Jun 23 2019, 04:32 PM
Post #5


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1412
Joined: 14-October 05
From: Vermont
Member No.: 530



Ion propulsion?

With the leftover tonnes in the Ariane 6-2... maybe "small" is relative. Could maybe be several times more massive than Deep Space 1.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
rlorenz
post Jun 23 2019, 07:57 PM
Post #6


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 486
Joined: 23-February 07
From: Occasionally in Columbia, MD
Member No.: 1764



QUOTE (stevesliva @ Jun 23 2019, 11:32 AM) *
Ion propulsion?


The proposal summary on their web page says it’s a trade to be performed whether chemical or electrical propulsion is used.

I’d suspect chemical is the way to go for a fast-response mission like this to keep cost down. Remember that it starts at L2, so you can dive into the gravity well for an efficient departure.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ynyralmaen
post Jun 24 2019, 10:00 PM
Post #7


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 121
Joined: 18-July 05
Member No.: 438



QUOTE (monty python @ Jun 20 2019, 07:19 AM) *
Just wonder how you get any decent delta V on those small probes.


The small probes would be attached to the primary spacecraft at L2 and for the cruise to the target. Separation would be around a day to weeks from closest approach, depending on the separation distances needed between the three elements (depends on activity level of the target and desired miss distances).

Separation of the three by diverging Keplerian orbits could be sufficient, but if not, the primary can use its own thrusters to increase rate of separation, rather than the subspacecraft needing to carry their own thrusters.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dtolman
post Jun 26 2019, 03:32 AM
Post #8


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 95
Joined: 20-April 05
Member No.: 291



The mission profile for a potential exo-asteroid/comet interceptor would be very similar - a probe hanging around a Lagrange Point for an interception opportunity. Is there anything stopping this probe from intercepting ʻOumuamua Part II if it should occur once its on station at L2? Or does it lack the propulsion to catch up with something that fast?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Jun 26 2019, 04:31 AM
Post #9


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 8406
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



This would be a flyby, not a rendezvous, so it's probably not a question of catching up to it, just getting close enough for as long as possible. However, if the relative velocities are too high then a flyby probably wouldn't return enough data to make it worthwhile.

It's gonna be a situational call for every candidate object. Presumably extrasolar candidates would be of most interest but geometry & timing will make all the difference plus the estimated longevity of the spacecraft; it can't hang out at L2 waiting forever. Maybe they'll have a contingency alternate mission to Encke or some other inner system object if the clock starts running out. (3200 Phaethon would be a great choice...)


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Hungry4info
post Jun 26 2019, 05:21 AM
Post #10


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1191
Joined: 26-July 08
Member No.: 4270



By the time this gets launched, LSST should be online and operating, giving us several targets of both solar and extrasolar origin.


--------------------
-- Hungry4info (Sirius_Alpha)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post Jun 26 2019, 01:16 PM
Post #11


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1701
Joined: 13-February 10
From: Ontario
Member No.: 5221



The Phase 2 proposal paper says (at page 4)

"In the highly unlikely case that no such target can be found in time, a backup short period comet (baseline 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann3, but others are possible) can be studied, taking advantage of the mission's multi-point capabilities to make unique measurements that would still advance on Rosetta’s achievements in mapping the coma and comet/solarwind interaction."

http://www.cometinterceptor.space/uploads/...ive_summary.pdf
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 15th December 2019 - 01:01 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.