IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

3 Pages V  < 1 2 3 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Mars2020 landing cameras
nprev
post Jun 16 2016, 06:43 PM
Post #16


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 7968
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



...clearly we gotta be more careful what we post in jest lest it be taken seriously... biggrin.gif

You just don't buy a couple of $300 cams at an electronics store & slap them on to a top-of-the-line interplanetary mission with planned significant longevity, obviously. I can see GoPro getting a contract to build custom cams to reduce mass & comply with both vehicle interface requirements & PPPs. No idea if that would be favorable in terms of cost and performance vs. building them in-house or procuring them from flight-proven vendors, but it really would have to be in order to offset the increased risk level.


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Stratespace
post Jun 16 2016, 08:48 PM
Post #17


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 21
Joined: 7-January 13
Member No.: 6834



One of the main issues is to decouple the GoPros from the spacecraft onboard software to avoid any pollution in case of firmware crash. The validation of GoPro's firmware is very far from those of space software. If the interface is still USB (not native at all in space hardware), one can imagine there will be a dedicated hardware to ensure the proper interface and soft safety. Not a small business.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Jun 16 2016, 09:15 PM
Post #18


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 7968
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



No, not at all. I strongly suspect that this idea will be off the table in short order for those reasons alone.


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Stratespace
post Jun 16 2016, 09:25 PM
Post #19


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 21
Joined: 7-January 13
Member No.: 6834



Yes maybe. But it went through the clearance procedures in JPL up to a publication and presentation at a conference. Not a big deal, but... still an official publication toward the scientific/engineering community.
We may suspect those details have been discussed and considered not a show stopper so far. I cannot imagine JPL presenting fairytales in a project that will launch 4 years from now.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dvandorn
post Jun 22 2016, 11:16 PM
Post #20


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3408
Joined: 9-February 04
From: Minneapolis, MN, USA
Member No.: 15



The cameras on the descent stage will obviously need to send and store their data real-time to the rover, obviously, for transmission back to Earth after landing.

Is there any advantage to making this a wireless connection, which can then also provide video from rover release to the end of the fly-away maneuver? That could provide an initial low-level flyover of a section of the local terrain where the rover won't likely be allowed to go (contamination issues), and give more data about the entire site. Sort of a first survey along the lines of the proposed hopper-copter's aerial surveys. This could even use the same radio data channel that will later be used to connect the rover to the hopper-copter.

I'm just trying to think of ways to get the maximum value out of these cameras. Besides the extreme cool factor, of course... biggrin.gif

-the other Doug



--------------------
“The trouble ain't that there is too many fools, but that the lightning ain't distributed right.” -Mark Twain
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post Jul 16 2016, 12:37 AM
Post #21


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1426
Joined: 13-February 10
From: British Columbia
Member No.: 5221



A microphone, at last! http://www.planetary.org/blogs/bruce-betts...es-on-mars.html
Mounted on the camera, for scientific purposes (to listen to the cracking noise from the laser), though I'm glad whatever the reason!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gerald
post Jul 16 2016, 09:18 AM
Post #22


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1847
Joined: 7-December 12
Member No.: 6780



I'd expect to hear some occasional cracking of rocks near sunrise and sunset when temperature is changing rapidly. But maybe InSight is better equipped for this purpose.
Another conceivable application could be a sonar. By measuring signal travel times after a ChemCam shot you could reconstruct some 3d information about the environment; this would of course work better with more than one microphone. But zapping several targets might work, too. And you could learn something about the sound damping properties of the ground, which is related to roughness and hardness.
Combine this acoustic surface property map with visual, and maybe with thermal maps, and you get an enriched basis to select targets of interest for contact science.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Jul 16 2016, 10:29 PM
Post #23


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 7968
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



Gotta remember how exceedingly thin Mars' atmosphere is, though. I suspect that the only truly noisy part will be EDL, and even that's gonna sound pretty subdued compared to an equivalent event on Earth.

We'll probably hear sounds from the rover mechanisms via structural conduction, and perhaps there will be a windstorm or a direct hit by a dust devil that might produce a faint whistle or two, but short of that I suspect that Mars is very quiet indeed.


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
climber
post Jul 17 2016, 10:42 AM
Post #24


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2780
Joined: 14-February 06
From: Very close to the Pyrénées Mountains (France)
Member No.: 682



Will be surprised if Mars will not surprise...


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
vjkane
post Jul 17 2016, 11:14 PM
Post #25


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 481
Joined: 22-April 05
Member No.: 351



QUOTE (dvandorn @ Jun 22 2016, 03:16 PM) *
The cameras on the descent stage will obviously need to send and store their data real-time to the rover, obviously, for transmission back to Earth after landing.

Maybe they will just store the data on the microSD card and download it at leisure via a usb cable.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
scalbers
post Jul 17 2016, 11:22 PM
Post #26


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1261
Joined: 5-March 05
From: Boulder, CO
Member No.: 184



Would a LIDAR help with 3D mapping of the local terrain to help with stereo imaging and constructing 3D models?


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mcaplinger
post Jul 18 2016, 12:01 AM
Post #27


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1588
Joined: 13-September 05
Member No.: 497



QUOTE (vjkane @ Jul 17 2016, 03:14 PM) *
Maybe they will just store the data on the microSD card and download it at leisure via a usb cable.

After the descent stage flies away? You'd need a rather long cable. wink.gif


--------------------
Disclaimer: This post is based on public information only. Any opinions are my own.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
TheAnt
post Jul 19 2016, 03:23 PM
Post #28


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 474
Joined: 12-February 12
Member No.: 6336



QUOTE (vjkane @ Jul 18 2016, 01:14 AM) *
Maybe they will just store the data on the microSD card and download it at leisure via a usb cable.


From Earth to Mars? That would require a seriously long USB cable, not to mention the need to use serious bug and virus detection before any transfer can be allowed.
Another risk is that if we have such a direct connection to Mars, it would not take long before we get the first spams with messages like:
I am the widow of the former president of Cryse. Help me transfer my 3 billion from Hellas to Syrtis Major, please send 10^7 Maritan rollads to my account to faciliate the transfer. tongue.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
vjkane
post Jul 20 2016, 01:43 PM
Post #29


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 481
Joined: 22-April 05
Member No.: 351



QUOTE (TheAnt @ Jul 19 2016, 08:23 AM) *
From Earth to Mars? That would require a seriously long USB cable, not to mention the need to use serious bug and virus detection before any transfer can be allowed.
Another risk is that if we have such a direct connection to Mars, it would not take long before we get the first spams with messages like:
I am the widow of the former president of Cryse. Help me transfer my 3 billion from Hellas to Syrtis Major, please send 10^7 Maritan rollads to my account to faciliate the transfer. tongue.gif

I had been thinking of just a few inches to a bus in the rover, but a cable stretching all the way back to Earth would eliminate the need for those expensive relay orbiters. laugh.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
climber
post Aug 28 2016, 11:38 AM
Post #30


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2780
Joined: 14-February 06
From: Very close to the Pyrénées Mountains (France)
Member No.: 682



There is the following information on AW&ST August 15-28 2016 issue regarding the microphone:
"SuperCam also will have a microphone, both to gather information about the targets being hit with the laser light and to collect more data on the Martian weather. Wind sounds will be correlated with wind-speed measurements collected by the rover's weather instruments, while the volume of sound generated by laser's "zap" is directly proportional to the hardness of the rocks". The quote is from Roger Wiens of Los Alamos, the PI of both ChemCam and SuperCam
This is much more than I was anticipating regarding sound conduction by Martian air. Must be very sensitive to collect such information. Most of us were thinking we'll listen only at rover's noises I'd said.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

3 Pages V  < 1 2 3 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 21st August 2017 - 05:55 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.