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Juno Perijove 17, December 21, 2018
Sean
post Dec 29 2018, 04:19 AM
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Moons

Brian's script... I've upscaled these 300%
PJ17_02


PJ17_03


PJ17_04


PJ17_05


PJ17_06

there is a color channel astray in this last frame



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mcaplinger
post Dec 29 2018, 04:13 PM
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I think your processing may be filtering out an interesting aspect of the Io images, especially pj17-006.


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Sean
post Dec 29 2018, 05:14 PM
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Direct result from Brian's script without any additional processing by me ( except cropping )

I can see a bright-ish dot in the center of one of the moons... and a bright flare on the other ( PJ17_06 )

PJ17_02


PJ17_03


PJ17_04


PJ17_04


PJ17_05


PJ17_05


PJ17_06


PJ17_06


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mcaplinger
post Dec 29 2018, 06:40 PM
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Where's Jason Perry when you need him?


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mcaplinger
post Dec 29 2018, 06:47 PM
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QUOTE (Sean @ Dec 29 2018, 09:14 AM) *
I can see a bright-ish dot in the center of one of the moons... and a bright flare on the other ( PJ17_06 )

The "flare" is a blooming artifact, ignore it.


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Bjorn Jonsson
post Dec 29 2018, 11:10 PM
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This is image PJ17_13 in two different versions:

Attached Image


At left is an approximately true color/contrast version. The version at right is also approximately true color/contrast but the effects of the variable illumination have been removed. This reveals details in dimly lit areas near the terminator, including on the night side just beyond the terminator (there the night side is faintly illuminated by scattered light from Jupiter's sky). The bluish color near the terminator in the image at right is a processing artifact and not a real feature.
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Sean
post Jan 2 2019, 02:21 AM
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Latest from Perijove 17 using Brian's script...

PJ17_22, 23, 24 ( true / enhanced )






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mcaplinger
post Jan 2 2019, 02:50 AM
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https://www.swri.org/press-release/light-fr...no-jupiter-moon

QUOTE
A team of space scientists has captured new images of a volcanic plume on Jupiter’s moon Io during the Juno mission’s 17th flyby of the gas giant.



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climber
post Jan 2 2019, 07:51 AM
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Thanks Mike. They are suprised Juno can detect plumes but they don’t provide the distance from the spacecraft to Io. Anyone get the information?
Thanks


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mcaplinger
post Jan 2 2019, 02:34 PM
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QUOTE (climber @ Jan 1 2019, 11:51 PM) *
They are suprised Juno can detect plumes but they don’t provide the distance from the spacecraft to Io.

I didn't have much to do with this press release.

If you read the Junocam image caption, it says "The image... was acquired at 12:20 (UTC) on Dec. 21, 2018. The Juno spacecraft was approximately 300,000 km from Io."


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volcanopele
post Jan 2 2019, 03:29 PM
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SPICE Geometry calculator is your friend:

https://wgc.jpl.nasa.gov:8443/webgeocalc/

46.9298 N, 75.3948 W
299,083 km

Sorry Mike, I had a lot of family in town for the holidays so I haven't been keeping up with Juno lately (besides I usually focus on JIRAM data when it hits the PDS). Congrats to your team on an amazing photo of a plume!

Now that I am back at work, I get a nice Io diversion! YAY!

Plume is from Chalybes Regio eruption, btw. Most significant post-NH eruption, has been ongoing since October 2008. I'm focusing mostly on the JIRAM image from the press release. I can say that the brightest hotspot is not Chalybes Regio, but Tvashtar, so that one is active again (it's been pretty quiescent for much of the Juno mission)


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stevesliva
post Jan 2 2019, 03:41 PM
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QUOTE (volcanopele @ Jan 2 2019, 10:29 AM) *
Plume is from Chalybes Regio eruption, btw. Most significant post-NH eruption, has been ongoing since October 2008. I'm focusing mostly on the JIRAM image from the press release. I can say that the brightest hotspot is not Chalybes Regio, but Tvashtar, so that one is active again (it's been pretty quiescent for much of the Juno mission)


This says so much with few words. Thanks! The image release had little geological context.
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volcanopele
post Jan 2 2019, 04:41 PM
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Attached Image


Best I could do with the JIRAM image. brightest hotspot is Tvashtar (but that's not the plume, Chalybes is). other bright hotspots include Chalybes 1, Chalybes 2, Zal, Janus, Vivasvant, W Zal, Amirani, Gishbar, and Tawhaki.


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mcaplinger
post Jan 2 2019, 04:49 PM
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QUOTE (stevesliva @ Jan 2 2019, 07:41 AM) *
The image release had little geological context.

Mostly because none of us know as much about Io as Jason does. I spent several hours on Christmas looking at maps of Io and trying to figure it out without much luck.


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volcanopele
post Jan 2 2019, 05:11 PM
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Understandable. The volcano is new since Galileo and New Horizons so the area doesn't scream "major volcano" on maps.


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