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Rev 16 - Oct 2-21, 2005 - Dione D1
abalone
post Oct 11 2005, 10:49 AM
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Just 17 hrs and 8 hours from closest approach. Current view.

http://space.jpl.nasa.gov/


Last sim is with about 15 min to closest approach in about 7hr 45 min,

.....what a view!!!!!
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abalone
post Oct 11 2005, 11:43 AM
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Partial eclipse of Rhea by Dione 16 Hrs before closest approach. Hope the real thing run according to plan
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Decepticon
post Oct 11 2005, 12:06 PM
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There is a thred already started.
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abalone
post Oct 11 2005, 12:13 PM
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QUOTE (Decepticon @ Oct 11 2005, 11:06 PM)
There is a thred already started.
*

Did not realise, maybe they could be moved over.
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ugordan
post Oct 12 2005, 01:26 PM
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Still no news on the success of the flyby and no raw images?
I'm starting to wonder if they're cooking up another unpleasant surprise for us?
Previous experience seems to show that no news is bad news... blink.gif


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tedstryk
post Oct 12 2005, 02:30 PM
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QUOTE (ugordan @ Oct 12 2005, 01:26 PM)
Still no news on the success of the flyby and no raw images?
I'm starting to wonder if they're cooking up another unpleasant surprise for us?
Previous experience seems to show that no news is bad news...  blink.gif
*


The first few images are up. Check this one out!


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TheChemist
post Oct 12 2005, 02:40 PM
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Wow, what an amazing eclipse image cool.gif

Edit: I could not resist and made a quicky GIF movie. Some frames from the begining of the sequence are not available yet.
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Phil Stooke
post Oct 12 2005, 03:50 PM
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Here's the latest Dione image, processed to reveal details evenly across the surface, which has the effect of smoothing the global brightness gradient (high pass filter, but with edge artifacts removed):

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It shows the smooth plains area at right very nicely. This is the best candidate for cryovolcanic resurfacing anywhere in these icy satelites except Enceladus.

Phil


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volcanopele
post Oct 12 2005, 03:51 PM
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QUOTE (ugordan @ Oct 12 2005, 06:26 AM)
Still no news on the success of the flyby and no raw images?
I'm starting to wonder if they're cooking up another unpleasant surprise for us?
Previous experience seems to show that no news is bad news...  blink.gif
*

Everything going fine!


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gndonald
post Oct 12 2005, 03:59 PM
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I'd like to nomintate the entire Rhea eclipse sequence as the best series of images in the mission so far.

I rate this image as my personal favorite.
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jmknapp
post Oct 12 2005, 04:19 PM
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Nice one here:

Dione



Like fractured glass--interesting set of lines crossing at a point.


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volcanopele
post Oct 12 2005, 04:24 PM
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QUOTE (jmknapp @ Oct 12 2005, 09:19 AM)
Like fractured glass--interesting set of lines crossing at a point.
*

That's from a few flybys ago but still nice.

Cassandra is a strange feature...


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Rob Pinnegar
post Oct 12 2005, 04:30 PM
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Everyone's been referring to this Dione/Rhea "line-up" as an "eclipse", which got me thinking about actual eclipses.

Roundabout 2009 or so, when Saturn's rings go edge-on as seen from Earth, the moons will actually be able to eclipse one another. I haven't done the calculations, but my guess is that Rhea's umbra should be able to cover up all the other inner moons entirely. This leads to some interesting possibilities -- it'll be neat to see Enceladus, Tethys or Dione illuminated _only_ by Saturnshine!

Also, eclipses of Enceladus by Tethys, Dione and Rhea would be perfect times to look for evidence of Enceladan volcanism. No dazzling moon to spoil your long time exposure!

Just as interesting will be eclipses of the inner moons by Titan. Will its upper atmosphere "redden" them the way Earth's atmosphere reddens our Moon?
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volcanopele
post Oct 12 2005, 04:39 PM
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You wouldn't necessarily need another moon to eclipse Enceladus to get a good long exposure for plume searches. An eclipse by Saturn would do the trick.


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Rob Pinnegar
post Oct 12 2005, 04:57 PM
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QUOTE (volcanopele @ Oct 12 2005, 10:39 AM)
You wouldn't necessarily need another moon to eclipse Enceladus to get a good long exposure for plume searches.  An eclipse by Saturn would do the trick.
*

Hmmm. I hadn't thought of that. Would an eclipse by Saturn completely darken Enceladus while leaving some of the space around it in bright sunlight? I'm thinking of Saturn's atmosphere; there's gotta be some "fuzzing" there.

Anyways, I went forward in time (on the Solar System Simulator) to see if it was possible to find a moon-moon eclipse just by searching for them around the time of solar ring-plane crossing. I did find one: Dione eclipses Enceladus on August 10th, 2009 at 07:58:00 UTC. The Simulator doesn't seem to render Dione's shadow on Enceladus; you have to select a view of Dione seen from Enceladus to see that it does indeed happen.

(On second thought, this eclipse stuff is kind of off topic for this thread. If anyone wants to follow this further, we ought to create a new thread for it.)
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