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Atmospheric Rendering using Real Observations, All-sky images
scalbers
post Jan 12 2014, 09:03 PM
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This might be near the edge of the UMSF scope, so if needed it can be moved to Chit-Chat. I've been working on taking a 3-D real-time cloud analysis, fed by Earth orbiting satellite and other types of remotely sensed and in-situ observations. This set of 3-D fields are then rendered to produce an all-sky image from a given vantage point. Finally this rendered image is being compared with actual camera images.

http://stevealbers.net/allsky/allsky_mtevans.html

While this is done right now on Earth's surface, including the top of a 14000 foot mountain, it can be extended to work higher in the atmosphere, near-earth space, or other planets/satellites with atmospheres. The idea is to take into account scattering of sunlight, moonlight, etc. by various components of the atmosphere, including clouds, precipitation, and aerosols. Twilight is interesting to render as well.

Steve
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scalbers
post Jan 22 2017, 06:01 PM
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A redo of a sunset, this time from space at 400km altitude.

Attached Image


QUOTE (stevesliva @ Feb 15 2015, 05:09 AM) *
It would be neat to have the google-earth type datasets combined with the meteorological ones.

These renderings use land surface spectral albedo information from the Next Generation Blue marble, along with USGS topography data (albeit with limited resolution during closeup views). Below is a depiction of what a launch would look like during early twilight starting at ground level and going up to 400km altitude. The sun is two degrees below the horizontal, though it rises above the limb soon after launch.

Attached Image


http://stevealbers.net/outerspace/animated_polar.gif (animation)

The hemispherical animated view looks up for the first 15km then looks down. 3D clouds are included and some cloud shadows (crepuscular rays) are visible.


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