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Spirit retrospective, - a few details from my current project
ngunn
post Jun 4 2012, 08:51 AM
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Thanks Phil and fredk. Unfortunately the links in the old thread no longer seem to work so I'm still not sure how thoroughly and securely distant horizon features were identified back then. First impression is that Spirit's visibility range probably exceeded Opportunity's Miyamoto sighting in several directions, though only by a few km. If she broke the 100km mark anywhere it was most likely to the S but it's not possible to tell without closer scrutiny of the terrain out there.
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Phil Stooke
post Jun 4 2012, 02:17 PM
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Yes, it's sad to go back and see all the things that have disappeared.

Phil



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... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
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djellison
post Jun 4 2012, 03:54 PM
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Imagehost, XS and others have all gone away or have a policy of deleting older content. It's a shame, but that's the risk you run with free hosting facilities.
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fredk
post Jun 9 2012, 03:21 PM
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If anyone's curious, here are a couple of the images from that old thread, resurrected from the cobwebby depths of my harddrive:
Attached Image

Attached Image

Those are the only Gusev rim related pics I kept from that thread.

It is a shame indeed about the hosting site. Even more so since these images were tiny - there was no reason not to put them on UMSF in the first place!
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ngunn
post Jun 9 2012, 04:01 PM
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Well rescued! smile.gif smile.gif smile.gif There's all the information I was after right there - a useful complement/comparison with Phil's excellent summit pan.
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fredk
post Jun 9 2012, 07:17 PM
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So as far as seeing outside of Gusev, I've marked three locations on the view map:
Attached Image

We can clearly see the far rim of the smaller crater (New Plymouth?) at A. This map predicts that we should be able to see a bit farther to another smaller crater rim at B, but it's not clear to me whether we can see that in Phil's horizon pan or not.

I also wonder whether we can see some uncertain distance up Ma'adim Vallis to perhaps one of its walls, towards C. That would be somewhere around here on Phil's pan:
Attached Image

Unfortunately part of the Columbia Hills is in the way. But maybe there are pancam images that were taken from farther west (on approach to the summit) that would be unobstructed?

Phil: any chance you could post your original rectangular horizon pan at full res? Perhaps cropping out the foreground if the filesize is too big?
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Phil Stooke
post Jun 9 2012, 07:35 PM
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Will do when I get to the office on Monday.

Phil



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ngunn
post Jun 9 2012, 09:31 PM
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QUOTE (fredk @ Jun 9 2012, 08:17 PM) *
We can clearly see the far rim of the smaller crater (New Plymouth?) at A. This map predicts that we should be able to see a bit farther to another smaller crater rim at B, but it's not clear to me whether we can see that in Phil's horizon pan or not.


B would, I think, break 100km but I wouldn't be surprised if it's not actually visible. If I remember rightly pgrindrod's visibility maps neglected the curvature of Mars. He was mainly concerned with closer features so that was fair enough. There's no way of knowing whether this one does or not. It's worth a thorough look though.

C: The view down the valley is definitely worth exploring in detail. If the most distant point on the horizon lies in that direction it should be possible to pinpoint the location and distance with the information available.

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fredk
post Jun 9 2012, 09:39 PM
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QUOTE (ngunn @ Jun 9 2012, 10:31 PM) *
There's no way of knowing whether this one does or not.
From the first post by erwin in that old thread:
QUOTE
I use 128 pixel/degrees data, cropped gusev area, sphericise the heights according to Mars diameter.
So it seems he did take curvature into account.

Also, he says he cropped on Gusev, so any distant far wall of the Vallis may be outside of his cropped region. So his rendering of the C region may not show a distant wall that's actually visible...
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Phil Stooke
post Jun 10 2012, 01:03 PM
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One other thing which I have not done yet... these images were part of the Everest panorama taken on sols 620-622, and it was multispectral. Some bands were subsampled images but three were full resolution. So it would be possible to take all three full res bands at 16 bit from PDS and stretch to optimize the distant features, and then merge them to increase signal. That might help reveal details on the distant rim.

Phil



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Phil Stooke
post Jun 11 2012, 02:25 PM
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OK, here is a cropped version of my full horizon panorama. It's quite dirty, and got cleaned up quite a bit for the circular view. It really is quite hard to pull out that very faint detail.

Phil

Attached Image


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jasedm
post Jun 11 2012, 04:47 PM
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That's awesome!!
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Phil Stooke
post Jun 11 2012, 05:20 PM
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Ugliest pan ever!

Phil



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MoreInput
post Jun 11 2012, 08:01 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Jun 11 2012, 07:20 PM) *
Ugliest pan ever!

No, it is just one of the best panoramas ever seen on Mars, Thx for it!


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machi
post Jun 11 2012, 08:55 PM
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Cool, ugly panorama! biggrin.gif

So many peaks everywhere!


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