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Himawari
scalbers
post Jul 21 2015, 05:20 PM
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Here is a real-time full color view of the Earth from the Himawari satellite, updated every half hour or so. This geostationary weather satellite is stationed over the longitude of Japan. The view is complete with orange sunglint off the ocean. You can click on the link to see the latest update.

Attached Image


http://www.jma.go.jp/en/gms/largec.html?ar...=1&mode=UTC

I previously posted this high resolution sample image in the Whole Earth Images thread. We can look around for the full resolution real-time data archive that would be about 11000 pixels wide.


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lyford
post Jul 22 2015, 08:03 AM
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Wonderful! Thank you.


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"Zis is not nuts, zis is super-nuts!" Mathematician Richard Courant on viewing an Orion test
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scalbers
post Jul 29 2015, 12:03 AM
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Another view with a gibbous Earth:

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djellison
post Jul 29 2015, 12:09 AM
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I've tried ( but failed ) to find a source for the full res data - it's just so stunning.
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johnmerritt
post Jul 29 2015, 05:56 AM
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Not the full res data, but I was able to locate four higher resolution partial disk images, which if pieced together make a nearly full disk image. These can be found by looking at the raw full disk URL, e.g. http://www.jma.go.jp/en/gms/imgs_c/6/visib...07290500-00.png, then change the number after "/imgs_c/" to 1, 2, 3, or 4. A number 0 gets you what appears to be a zoomed in region near the east coast of China.
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MahFL
post Jul 29 2015, 01:57 PM
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You can see the clearly on the images the North Pole in constant daylight, pretty neat.
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scalbers
post Jul 29 2015, 06:42 PM
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Good detective work and mosaic johnmerrit! Here is a (low-res) full-disk current day movie with a 10-minute cadence. Interesting to see how the sun glint changes as it moves across the ocean.

http://himawari8.nict.go.jp/himawari8-movie.htm#

And a saved animation is shown here on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSqgMF596MI


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stevesliva
post Jul 30 2015, 12:10 AM
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QUOTE (scalbers @ Jul 29 2015, 02:42 PM) *
Interesting to see how the sun glint changes as it moves across the ocean.


Yeah, watch that area, and it's a stark illustration of phase affect in some places, as areas go from brighter to darker than surroundings rapidly.
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xflare
post Aug 7 2015, 04:29 PM
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The full disk images are now at full resolution. Incredible view of Super Typhoon SOUDELOR
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scalbers
post Aug 7 2015, 05:35 PM
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Sounds intriguing. Is there a link where the full-disk full-resolution images are now regularly available, or at least for this typhoon?


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stevesliva
post Aug 7 2015, 05:52 PM
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Visible (Color) imagery, including animations, here:
http://www.jma.go.jp/en/gms/

Midday is about 0300 UTC.

Make sure "region" is Full Disk if you want that.

err, wait, though... Is that full resolution?
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xflare
post Aug 7 2015, 06:03 PM
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I got them here http://rammb.cira.colostate.edu/ramsdis/on.../himawari-8.asp
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scalbers
post Aug 7 2015, 06:22 PM
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Nice - however the full color ones look to be processed to remove the original brightness variations relating to lighting geometry and atmospheric scattering. The full disk images are also "only" half resolution, compared with the sample I posted at the top of the thread. The floaters do show the typhoon better, and go to 500m resolution in monochromatic imagery. This compares to 1km resolution for the global views, that have 11000x11000 pixels.


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scalbers
post Aug 14 2015, 05:08 PM
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Here is a bit of info on a planned mechanism to make the Himawari-8 data available:

https://www.ssec.wisc.edu/mcidas/news/himawari_plans.html


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Dan Delany
post Aug 24 2015, 06:17 PM
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Hi all! Recently I have been experimenting with applying optical-flow-based motion interpolation to earth-observing satellite images - ie. guessing intermediate frames to make smoother videos with artificially higher framerates. I found two open source software libraries which estimate optical flow using different algorithms, and both seem to perform fairly well - slowmoVideo which implements the Kanade-Lucas algorithm, and Butterflow which implements the Farneback algorithm.

I downloaded all of the high-resolution full-disk images from the RAMMB link posted upthread and have been testing the two libraries on cropped regions and short timespans from this dataset. For each method, I started with a 6 FPS video generated from the underlying images. Then I applied a 0.5x speed stretch and motion-interpolated the results to 60 FPS, resulting in a "20x interpolation" - ie. 1 out of every 20 frames is a real image, the other 19 are interpolated.

Here is a comparison of the two methods, using one day of data which show the twin typhoons Goni and Atsani in the Pacific. The images used are 1920x1080 pixels, so make sure you force the quality to "1080p60" for best viewing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Skk58D3waQg

As you can see, the results seem to be pretty comparable during the daytime, when lighting conditions are fairly consistent from frame to frame. However, the Butterflow (Farneback) method appears to handle the dynamic lighting conditions near the terminator around the time of local twilight much better than the slowmoVideo (Kanade-Lucas) method.

Note that the speed of rotation appears to "jump" a few times - this is because most original frames are taken once-per-ten-minutes but there are a few frames missing, and I'm not correcting for this. Next on my to-do list is to handle this more gracefully by generating interpolated frames for the missing frames before performing the full 60 fps interpolation.

Overall I'm quite happy with the results - they may not serve any scientific purposes but they sure are pretty. I think I will produce some more videos using the Butterflow library once I handle the missing-frames problem. I may also integrate it with typhoon track data to produce "typhoon tracker" videos centered on the typhoons as they move around, but this would require a method for getting pixel location from lat/long, which would require reprojection, which I'm not sure if I have enough data for. This is my first attempt at motion interpolation, so any feedback or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
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