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Apollo Image Products., Various mosaics, composites and other imagery.
Airbag
post Jul 18 2008, 01:37 AM
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Nice "time averaging" composite!

This thread reminded me that the picture some posts above of a dirty, tired but obviously very satisfied Gene Cernan is one of my favorite Apollo program images. I think it sums up the program very well. And a nice surprise that it could be mosaiced with the one of the stowed helmets and lunar garments.

Airbag
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4th rock from th...
post Jul 18 2008, 09:59 AM
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Great processing on those Apollo 11 tv images. I'd like to see another version with the astronauts, just for scale and perspective. If they stay still for some time I guess frame averaging would reduce noise to an acceptable level.

One thing I'd like to do (although I don't know any software that would allow it) is to process the color video from latter missions restoring the original full 60fps of the camera (in black and white). This could be made by "splitting" the color data. The color data is just 20fps, because for each frame a different filter was used (so 60/3 = 20 fps). So for each normal frame of color video you can get the original 3 bw frames with full motion information. In practice this would be hard to do, but I think that the results might be very interesting.


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ilbasso
post Jul 18 2008, 01:45 PM
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Fabulous work, Don, thanks for posting - and great timing, too, as we're in the Anniversary Week. Hard to believe it has been 39 years!


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ilbasso
post Jul 20 2008, 07:27 PM
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Does anyone ever find themselves wondering if July 20 will someday be declared a world holiday, to celebrate mankind's crowning achievement of the 20th century?


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climber
post Jul 20 2008, 07:58 PM
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QUOTE (ilbasso @ Jul 20 2008, 09:27 PM) *
Does anyone ever find themselves wondering if July 20 will someday be declared a world holiday, to celebrate mankind's crowning achievement of the 20th century?

yes I did. Nevertheless, if you read any boog in french related to 1st Moon landing, they refer to when Neil first set FOOT on the Moon which was on ...July 21st here.


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DDAVIS
post Jul 20 2008, 10:07 PM
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>Great processing on those Apollo 11 tv images. I'd like to see another version with the astronauts, just for scale and perspective.


I provided such an image for this latest entry of my Apollo 11 annual tribute:

http://www.donaldedavis.com/PARTS/Apollo30.html

Aldrin is that vertical blob next to the right leg, in the shadow.

Don
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nprev
post Jul 20 2008, 10:33 PM
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Striking (and depressing) sequence of images showing the deterioration of a lunar footprint, Don. smile.gif sad.gif

(Can't ever help but have mixed feelings on this day.)


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TheChemist
post Jul 21 2008, 07:51 AM
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Don, your tribute makes a sad but great reading, thanks.

QUOTE
"It wasn't until the last Lunar expedition that Harrison Schmitt raised his visor deliberately in front of the camera to give history the only brief look at a human being in a spacesuit on the Moon."


I had no idea about this. I googled to no result. Is this image available anywhere ?
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Stu
post Jul 21 2008, 08:10 AM
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I think this might be it...

http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Lau...to/schmitt1.jpg

Here's another view...

http://history.nasa.gov/alsj/a17/a17schmitt.face.jpg

I know hindsight is always perfect, and they were rather busy up there, and it was a different age, etc etc, but I'm constantly amazed at how many historic photo opportunities were lost during the Apollo EVAs... no definitive image of Armstrong on the Moon (like the one in Alan Bean's painting)... no image of the actual "First Footprint"... just that one "visor up" shot... But yeah, NASA was less media- and Outreach-aware in those days. I imagine they'll do things VERY differently when the next missions go, and when people reach Mars.


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climber
post Jul 21 2008, 11:19 AM
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QUOTE (Stu @ Jul 21 2008, 10:10 AM) *
just that one "visor up" shot...

This is may be the only "visor up" astronaut shown on the moon but I remember an enhanced product by Olivier de Goursac (Vickingmars) that clearly shows Aldrin face through the visor looking at Armstrong who was taking the picture.
Unfortunately I cannot find it. Olivier, if your read this ...


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dvandorn
post Jul 21 2008, 11:56 AM
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Well, in fact, it's not really true that Schmitt was the first to be seen on the lunar surface with his gold visor up. There are several images of Aldrin with his visor up in the video record of the very first moonwalk, all of which occurred early in the EVA when the camera was still located on the MESA, in the LM's shadow. Armstrong collected the contingency sample on Apollo 11 with his visor up, as well -- not visible on the TV, as he was out of the camera FOV at the time, but clearly visible in the 16mm film taken of those activities.

Two LMPs, Ed Mitchell and Jim Irwin, came down the ladder with their gold visors up, and the TV record shows this clearly. And at one point, on Apollo 17, Gene Cernan had his visor up while he cleaned the TV camera lens and you get a good view of his face as he finishes the dusting job.

So, between the film and video record, there are images of at least six of the twelve moonwalkers with their gold visors up and their faces visible.

Just FYI...

-the other Doug


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Stu
post Jul 21 2008, 12:02 PM
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QUOTE (dvandorn @ Jul 21 2008, 12:56 PM) *
So, between the film and video record, there are images of at least six of the twelve moonwalkers with their gold visors up and their faces visible.


Thanks Doug, I wasn't aware of that. Appreciate the expert input. Looks like I have some serious Googling to do! smile.gif


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centsworth_II
post Jul 21 2008, 01:26 PM
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QUOTE (Stu @ Jul 21 2008, 03:10 AM) *
...NASA was less media- and Outreach-aware in those days....

There were the feather and hammer drop and the golf strokes. I guess those were more the initiative of individual astronauts than NASA, which makes them all the more special.
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Stu
post Jul 21 2008, 01:34 PM
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Oh go on then... go and have a play around here... but be back in time for tea...

Apollo images

smile.gif

Good calls, centsworth, but I think you're right, they were individual efforts rather than NASA Outreach. Not criticising NASA at all saying that, before anyone jumps down my throat, it was a very different time. Just gettin' a mite wistful and melancholy about images that might have been.... rolleyes.gif


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Stu
post Jul 21 2008, 01:47 PM
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QUOTE (dvandorn @ Jul 21 2008, 12:56 PM) *
Two LMPs, Ed Mitchell and Jim Irwin, came down the ladder with their gold visors up, and the TV record shows this clearly.


Wow... glad you flagged that up... found this...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AfBn6Vl-B2A

ohmy.gif smile.gif


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