IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

14 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Winter campaign at Cook Haven, Sol 3512 - 3599 (December 13, 2013 - March 10, 2014)
fredk
post Dec 30 2013, 08:47 PM
Post #16


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3769
Joined: 17-January 05
Member No.: 152



QUOTE (jvandriel @ Dec 19 2013, 10:30 AM) *
The Dust Devil on Sol 3514.

Here's a stretched difference of the (smoothed) 3514 and 3520 frames:
Attached Image

By matching features with an orbital view, I estimate the dd's distance as 2.9 km. That translates into a height of at least 230 metres. Since the dd extends to the top of the frame it is likely a fair bit taller than that. (You could estimate the full height from the length of the dark streak to its right, assuming that is its shadow.)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
fredk
post Jan 4 2014, 04:01 AM
Post #17


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3769
Joined: 17-January 05
Member No.: 152



Oppy's up to 371 Whr now. Recently she was 100 Whr below this level, and 371 is pretty high for this time of year. I wouldn't be surprized if levels like this mean more driving flexibility.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Jan 7 2014, 03:28 PM
Post #18


Martian Cartographer
****

Group: Members
Posts: 7219
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



The big panorama being created now includes the best view yet of Cape York from this area. Here is a composite of two frames:

Attached Image


and a 3x stretch to help interpret it. The distant horizon ridge would run up to the Santa Maria area.

Attached Image




Phil



--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
fredk
post Jan 7 2014, 04:41 PM
Post #19


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3769
Joined: 17-January 05
Member No.: 152



Thanks for those, Phil. I can't wait to see this anniversary sequence in colour...

We haven't been to the distant ridge behind CY, but I see what you mean by it running to Santa Maria.

But we were in the direction of this frame, where we can also now see a distant ridge:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportuni...2M1.JPG?sol3539
This frame (more accurately the left side of the frame) is looking roughly towards where we made our big turn east after heading south from Victoria. I mentioned recently that our first sighting of Solander was around sol 2269 - that's also at the turn to the east. So we may now be seeing our route across the plains (though that depends how far away that distant ridge is).
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
udolein
post Jan 7 2014, 06:32 PM
Post #20


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 40
Joined: 29-December 11
Member No.: 6295



My color version of Opportunity's Selfie of Sol 3538:
Attached Image

Click here for a larger version

Cheers, Udo


--------------------
But to be a lament on the lips of the loved one is glorious, For the prosaic goes toneless to Orcus below. (Friedrich Schiller: Naenie)
Home of marspages.eu and plutoidenpages.eu
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Tesheiner
post Jan 8 2014, 06:41 PM
Post #21


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 4276
Joined: 19-April 05
From: .br at .es
Member No.: 253



Here's the last MER Update by A.J.S. Rayl, containing a lot of goodies as usual.
I just would like to highlight a few details about the winter campaign and future plans after this season.
QUOTE
Now that the rover is employing the lily pad strategy on Murray Ridge, "this winter for Opportunity will probably be like Spirit's first winter at Husband Hill," Stroupe said. That means, barring any unforeseen untoward event, the rover will continue to rove, lily pad to lily pad, and work throughout the harsh season.


QUOTE
The scientists have already spotted "a field geologist's dream," as Arvidson calls it, some 600 meters further south.

"It's a beautiful stratigraphic section of crust that's exposed on the western side of Endeavour's rim," said Arvidson. "You can walk up and down through time and along time following the outcrop."
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ElkGroveDan
post Jan 8 2014, 07:45 PM
Post #22


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4732
Joined: 15-March 05
From: Sloughhouse, CA
Member No.: 197



QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Jan 7 2014, 07:28 AM) *
The big panorama being created now includes the best view yet of Cape York from this area. Here is a composite of two frames:

Thanks Phil. That perspective really highlights the how and why of the illusion we were all ensnared by a couple years ago where Cape York seemed to be a vertical-rising peak from the overhead HIRISE images.


--------------------
If Occam had heard my theory, things would be very different now.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
James Sorenson
post Jan 9 2014, 09:04 AM
Post #23


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 601
Joined: 21-December 07
From: Clatskanie, Oregon
Member No.: 3988



I wasn't going to post this and just wait until the color images came down, but here ya go. More to come. smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
atomoid
post Jan 11 2014, 01:21 AM
Post #24


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 679
Joined: 15-March 05
From: Santa Cruz, CA
Member No.: 196



x-eyes of that amusing 'lil chunkster and stereo MI on SOL3541 reminds me of a rock I collected as a child in a volcanic steam vent in Hawaii.
Attached Image
Attached Image
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mhoward
post Jan 11 2014, 02:11 AM
Post #25


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 3428
Joined: 11-August 04
From: USA
Member No.: 98



Wondering where 'Pinnacle Island' came from? So was I; well, I still am. But it looks like it appeared between Sols 3536 and 3540. So in other words, it probably appeared during the turn on Sol 3540. Neat, huh?


MERBSol3528-3540PinnacleIslandComparison on Flickr
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Jan 11 2014, 02:15 AM
Post #26


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 14008
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



Fascinating little rock - totally different to the bedrock beneath
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
 
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mhoward
post Jan 11 2014, 03:20 AM
Post #27


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 3428
Joined: 11-August 04
From: USA
Member No.: 98



It looks different from the bedrock underneath, but is it? Looking at the bottom edge in particular, I could almost image it's a piece of bedrock that was broken off and flipped over.

Edit: Actually, I figured out what it reminds me of, a bit. Snake River. (Insert standard 'I'm not a geologist' disclaimer.)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
James Sorenson
post Jan 11 2014, 05:04 AM
Post #28


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 601
Joined: 21-December 07
From: Clatskanie, Oregon
Member No.: 3988



Or "Tintina".
http://mars.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/images/?ImageID=5145

But of coarse what we are seeing may or may not be similar materials.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mhoward
post Jan 11 2014, 06:21 AM
Post #29


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 3428
Joined: 11-August 04
From: USA
Member No.: 98



I think 'Tintina' was just the name for part of 'Snake River' that got broken off.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
walfy
post Jan 11 2014, 08:41 AM
Post #30


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 387
Joined: 5-January 10
Member No.: 5161



QUOTE (mhoward @ Jan 10 2014, 06:11 PM) *
...it looks like it appeared between Sols 3536 and 3540...?

This rock must have popped out pretty far from under the rover's weight. A new record!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

14 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 17th August 2017 - 09:23 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.