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Pluto System Cartography, places and names
JRehling
post Aug 27 2015, 11:01 AM
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A point of comparison:

The various Mars rovers had mission planning that included the use of unofficial names for, e.g., individual rocks, so that science teams could coordinate effectively. This was absolutely necessary for daily rover operations.

The Pluto observations, on the other hand, were all performed according to a pre-programmed script, so there was little to no operational need for unofficial names. It may be useful to have unofficial names in order to begin scientific work, but I don't think there's much hazard of serious problems at this point. Any papers referring to specific features will probably be published after some of the names have been finalized, so in those cases, the authors can perform an edit before final submission.

I once caught an error in the naming of linear features on Europa, where published papers and the USGS map were in conflict. An unfortunate glitch, but also a pretty small and temporary one. And that was due not to unofficial names, but because the continuity of two intertangled linea was hard to track with the human eye.
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stevesliva
post Aug 27 2015, 06:37 PM
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QUOTE (JRehling @ Aug 27 2015, 07:01 AM) *
but I don't think there's much hazard of serious problems at this point


Unless it becomes a skirmish in a wider war. (Which won't happen here on UMSF, thanks be to mod)
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centsworth_II
post Aug 27 2015, 06:41 PM
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Mod is great!
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Nafnlaus
post Sep 5 2015, 10:08 PM
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Kneel Before Mod!

hehe... but anyway, given the pace that the IAU naming process works at, I don't think we have to worry about conflicting names for some time. So I don't expect to see a lot of conflicts. smile.gif
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Gennady Ionov
post Sep 6 2015, 08:03 AM
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Icosahedral projection of Pluto map translated from scalbers map:
Attached Image

Icosahedral projection of Charon map translated from Bjorn Jonsson map:
Attached Image
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Gennady Ionov
post Sep 6 2015, 08:51 AM
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Color icosahedral projection of Pluto map from scalbers original map http://laps.noaa.gov/albers/sos/pluto/pluto_rgb_cyl_16k.png
Attached Image

Color icosahedral projection of Charon map from Bjorn Jonsson original map http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...t&id=37406
Attached Image
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Bill Harris
post Sep 6 2015, 11:35 AM
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What an interesting projections. Could it be printed, cut up and folded into a, uh, penta-whatever sphere?

--Bill


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Gennady Ionov
post Sep 6 2015, 11:40 AM
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QUOTE (Bill Harris @ Sep 6 2015, 04:35 PM) *
What an interesting projections. Could it be printed, cut up and folded into a, uh, penta-whatever sphere?

--Bill

Yes, it is possible to glue the icosahedron. I wanted to do it, but in my printer ended magenta cartridge ...
Cut off blue area after printing
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Gennady Ionov
post Sep 6 2015, 12:47 PM
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Printed
Attached Image

and glued icosahedron
Attached Image

It does not look as good as thought. Not enough sphericity ...
Icosahedral class I wrote for automatic construction of maps from LORRI images but not for making the globe.
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ZLD
post Sep 6 2015, 01:40 PM
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HAHA! laugh.gif

Great seeing someone try it out Gennady.

Seems like this could be a really good approximation for a globe. Translating the map into the strip could prove a bit more difficult.


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Bill Harris
post Sep 6 2015, 04:04 PM
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QUOTE
Yes, it is possible to glue the icosahedron...


Great, then I'll piddle away some time with it. I have some printable card stock which should do well. smile.gif

There was someone here (and maybe still is here) who specialized in producing really nice foldable globes of planetary bodies. More faces than an isocktawhatever (sorry, it's been decades since Mineralogy/Crystallography Classes and I don't feel like counting on my fingers in Latin) and really detailed.

Does anyone recall who that was?

--Bill


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chuckclark
post Sep 6 2015, 08:04 PM
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Might be me.

I made those foldable maps of several asteroids, and Phobos and Deimos that got a bit of attention a few years ago.

World maps with constant-scale natural boundaries, (samples at www.rightbasicbuilding.com).

As well as maps of spherical bodies that also fold to solids.

Trouble is, if trouble it be, that my maps of spherical bodies fold up to condensations of the sphere rather than nice spheres.

Other projection systems based on platonic solids generate better spheres. Some better than others: the icosahedral is pointy; the daisy-hemispheres is pretty good. The "apple-peel" example above is especially nice! I've not seen it before; someone should take a bow.)

So, anyway, mine come out lumpy or misshapen in an irregular manner that is a function of the natural boundary system selected as the map's border. The advantage is not so much the globe as it is the map itself, which is also irregular (sometimes highly irregular) but precisely so to display global patterns. A map of earth using (subsets of) continental divides is nice for contemplating global geomorphology, and can be rearranged for different perspectives on the subject.

I'm highly intrigued by the new information on Pluto, and begin to strategize a boundary system to experiment with, similar to what my coauthor and I did at last year's lpsc with Miranda, Ganymede, Dione and Enceladus.

Consider a bifurcating centroid-tree through Sputnik and then out the white lobes as a starting system. Not sure how far the apparent evidence could take it, perhaps branching again, from there.


It may be possible to identify points of interest and districts of distinction on an unseen hemisphere based on large-scale organization of an observed hemisphere. At least for bodies with shell-like crusts in existence long enough to have attained gross equilibrium. (This worked especially well on Ganymede, and not too bad on Dione, but of course this was reverse engineering because those surfaces are known in entirety or nearly so.) Miranda was another test, but of course the back side will remain unseen for the foreseeable future.

Pluto might be a nice test body for this conjecture, because some information about the hemisphere unobserved by New Horizons is in those 2011 blurry Hubble images, which some maps above have included.

No promises. I may get distracted by 67-P Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Or maybe Bennu.

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ngunn
post Sep 6 2015, 08:24 PM
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Also JRehling did one for Titan - see here: https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j...jCG0CjAYPLR3png

Something like that would be very nice for Pluto.
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ZLD
post Sep 6 2015, 09:39 PM
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My knowledge of cartography is pretty limited so apologies if this isn't useful to many frequenting this thread. I was pretty fascinated when I saw that apple-peeling projection and set out to find anything I could. Seems like interest in such a projection is limited, at least from a flat perspective sense but seems pretty useful in making globes. The relevant function to generate the line is called a 'Rhumb Line' I believe which is essentially a line that crosses the longitudinal coordinates at a constant angle. Here's another page also about rhumb lines. Can't seem to find anyone else that has translated this into a physical model though.

I think to create what was in the video I posted earlier, he probably takes a stereographic polar map and then overlays the function line and then does the opposite for the other hemisphere.


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Req
post Sep 6 2015, 11:29 PM
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QUOTE (ZLD @ Sep 6 2015, 02:39 PM) *
My knowledge of cartography is pretty limited so apologies if this isn't useful to many frequenting this thread. I was pretty fascinated when I saw that apple-peeling projection and set out to find anything I could. Seems like interest in such a projection is limited, at least from a flat perspective sense but seems pretty useful in making globes. The relevant function to generate the line is called a 'Rhumb Line' I believe which is essentially a line that crosses the longitudinal coordinates at a constant angle. Here's another page also about rhumb lines. Can't seem to find anyone else that has translated this into a physical model though.

I think to create what was in the video I posted earlier, he probably takes a stereographic polar map and then overlays the function line and then does the opposite for the other hemisphere.


Or there's this, a link from the page from the video, which appears to spit out something you can print given the proper input format, although I haven't tested it:

http://print-sphere.com/
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