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Charon Surface Observations: NH Post-Encounter Phase, 1 Aug 2015- TBD
nprev
post Aug 1 2015, 06:02 PM
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This topic is for images and discussion of same received after 1 Aug 2015.


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Gennady Ionov
post Aug 2 2015, 07:49 AM
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QUOTE (fredk @ Aug 2 2015, 07:50 PM) *
What makes you say that?

Yes, frame was taken 2015-07-16 03:44:20 UTC, more than a day after encounter.
Post deleted. Sorry for my mistake.
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fredk
post Aug 2 2015, 02:50 PM
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QUOTE (Gennady Ionov @ Aug 2 2015, 08:49 AM) *
the Sun is behind the Charon's disc

What makes you say that? The size of Charon in that post-encounter frame is roughly similar to its size in this frame:
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/soc/Pluto-Encounte...0x632_sci_1.jpg
That pre-encounter frame was taken more than a day before closest approach, so the post-encounter frame had to be taken roughly a day after closest approach. But the Charon-sun occultation occured only 2h 15m after closest approach. So the sun must be outside the frame on that Charon crescent image.
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Herobrine
post Aug 2 2015, 03:56 PM
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The picture fredk linked was taken from a range of 1,462,006 km, according to the metadata file.
The crescent image was taken from a range of 1,986,740 km, according to the metadata file, and since apparent diameter has a simple, inverse relationship with distance, Charon should be about 73.6% the size it was in the image fredk linked.

Not that that adds anything to the conversation
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Gennady Ionov
post Aug 4 2015, 06:21 PM
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QUOTE (JRehling @ Aug 4 2015, 11:04 PM) *
Checking the orbital positions, there were Charonshine opportunities for imaging Pluto on July 14, July 20, etc. and Plutoshine opportunities for imaging Charon on July 17, July 23, etc.

If we get some regional albedo information for the mid-southern latitudes, that would be great. A bonus would be if we get some details and/or could see if Charon has a dark region at the other pole, too. I'd love to see something like the Saturnshine images of Iapetus, but I'm not getting my hopes up.

Yes! I hope that Charon has a dark region at the southern pole, because I believe that Mordor Regio resulted from leakage of ice from the equator in the relaxation process of Charon nonsphericity during deceleration of rotation.
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alan
post Aug 6 2015, 08:53 PM
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Global Map of Pluto's Moon Charon
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Bill Harris
post Aug 7 2015, 12:41 AM
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This appears to be a ~ half-size (5000px wide vs 9520px wide) of the previously-released PIA19866 with no new data added, for those who have the earlier map.

http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19866

--Bill


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Bjorn Jonsson
post Aug 10 2015, 04:25 PM
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Here is an updated version of my map of Charon. The main changes are the addition of color (areas where no color was available are colorized) and the addition of a single 400 m/pixel image. Compared to the official map, there are some positional errors (typically ~10 pixels; more near the pole) but they do not affect the overall appearance of the map. Longitude 0 is at the left edge of the map.

Attached Image


I'll probably redo the map completely at higher resolution later this year.


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scalbers
post Aug 10 2015, 04:54 PM
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Nice map. I appreciate in particular the images are blended more smoothly at the boundaries than we often see in the official versions.


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Bill Harris
post Aug 18 2015, 05:21 PM
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Charon is turning out to be a delightfully complex and fascinating world. It has a polar crater-caldera, a system of lineations with a complex equatorial fracture system, a cratering history and a north-south dichotomy as well as seasonal frosts. Much more than the little Pluto tag-along we were thinking it was.

I am doing a presentation on the Geomorphology of Charon. As always, it is a work-in-progress, so check back:

LORRI-MVIC combined imagery
https://univ.smugmug.com/New-Horizons-Missi...2B%20MVIC-L.png

Preliminary Geomorph of Charon
https://univ.smugmug.com/New-Horizons-Missi...orph-v1.0-L.png


--Bill


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alan
post Sep 10 2015, 06:41 PM
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Upgraded image released

QUOTE
This image of Pluto's largest moon Charon, taken by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft 10 hours before its closest approach to Pluto on July 14, 2015 from a distance of 290,000 miles (470,000 kilometers), is a recently downlinked, much higher quality version of a Charon image released on July 15.


I wonder if this means other LORRI images currently posted will be replaced by less compressed versions tomorrow.
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Habukaz
post Sep 10 2015, 07:03 PM
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Charon's north pole looks to me like it could have a relatively young surface - or just having craters as dark as their surroundings?

Attached Image


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stevesliva
post Sep 10 2015, 07:19 PM
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NH Blog post today about how the red pole may be tholins left behind after some of Pluto's atmosphere freezes onto Charon's dark pole, only to sublimate away leaving behind trace tholins:
https://blogs.nasa.gov/pluto/2015/09/09/new...arons-red-pole/
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machi
post Sep 11 2015, 07:34 PM
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Colorized image of Charon from the newly published images.
2 stacked images colorized using MVIC data.
Resolution 2.3 km/pix.



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ngunn
post Sep 11 2015, 09:29 PM
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QUOTE (stevesliva @ Sep 10 2015, 08:19 PM) *
NH Blog post today about how the red pole may be tholins left behind after some of Pluto's atmosphere freezes onto Charon's dark pole, only to sublimate away leaving behind trace tholins:


Nice theory. If correct this must be a very slow or no longer active process as we see a few bright impact craters punched into it.
Wonderful image NH/machi. smile.gif
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