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Nasa announces new rover mission to Mars in 2020
Adam Hurcewicz
post Nov 9 2018, 07:50 PM
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In Jezero crater landing elipse to NASA Mars Rover 2020 (color version)
I use MRO-HiRISE DTM and ortho images from
https://www.uahirise.org/dtm/dtm.php?ID=ESP_045994_1985


Flight cover about 60% of landing elipse (center elipse is almost in the center image)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eK9edFndNr8
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Two DTM's - I use this from the right DTEEC_045994_1985_046060_1985
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Adam Hurcewicz from Poland
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Explorer1
post Nov 19 2018, 07:19 PM
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Looks like Jezero has been chosen at the final site. Appropriate given that it means 'lake' in my native language!
Pronunciation tips: Ye-Ze-Roh. Ye as in 'Yep'. Ze as in Zeppelin, and Roh as in Robot!
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Sean
post Nov 19 2018, 08:30 PM
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Here is some Jezero work I made a while back...

200 megapixel portrait


Flyby animation

4k version on Youtube


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Guest_mcmcmc_*
post Nov 20 2018, 01:30 PM
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QUOTE (nprev @ Jun 22 2018, 06:31 AM) *
Helicopter test in simulated Mars surface atmosphere at JPL.

That's very impressive, esp. considering that they can't simulate 0.38g. smile.gif

It looks like a good design for totally flat terrains. I see no propellers protection against contact with rocks, and no ways to recover from a tilt due to landing with a leg on a rock. In a word, it does not look very robust to Murphy's law. blink.gif

But I am curious to see the unfolding and deployment procedure.
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Phil Stooke
post Nov 21 2018, 01:57 AM
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I don't know about this, but I might expect a bit of hazard avoidance built in to protect against those problems.

Phil


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jccwrt
post Nov 26 2018, 02:54 AM
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I put together a CTX mosaic of Jezero and colorized it using data from Mars Express HRSC. The resolution mismatch leads to a lot of color artifacts near sharp boundaries, but it at least gives you a rough idea of the natural color variation within the scene. The full-resolution image is available at Flickr, and preserves the original ~6 m/px resolution of the CTX mosaic.


Jezero Crater
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Adam Hurcewicz
post Nov 26 2018, 08:19 AM
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QUOTE (jccwrt @ Nov 26 2018, 03:54 AM) *
I put together a CTX mosaic of Jezero and colorized it using data from Mars Express HRSC. The resolution mismatch leads to a lot of color artifacts near sharp boundaries, but it at least gives you a rough idea of the natural color variation within the scene. The full-resolution image is available at Flickr, and preserves the original ~6 m/px resolution of the CTX mosaic.


Jezero Crater



Thank very much! It's great.


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v7x
post Dec 21 2018, 04:05 AM
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Just curious, is Mars 2020 likely to be given another name in the future such as a name like Curiosity, Spirit, Opportunity etc, or is Mars 2020 its final given name? I thought it seemed odd since it will be landing and doing its operations in 2021 and beyond.
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PaulH51
post Dec 21 2018, 04:45 AM
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QUOTE (v7x @ Dec 21 2018, 12:05 PM) *
Just curious, is Mars 2020 likely to be given another name in the future such as a name like Curiosity, Spirit, Opportunity etc, or is Mars 2020 its final given name? I thought it seemed odd since it will be landing and doing its operations in 2021 and beyond.

NASA published a request for a partner to run a competition to name the 2020 rover... Here is a link to the press release. I may have missed it, but I've not seen the partner named yet. https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/nasa-seeki...next-mars-rover
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nprev
post Dec 21 2018, 06:15 AM
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NASA planetary missions are often initially referred to by their target world and the year of projected launch.


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A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
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Explorer1
post Mar 28 2019, 09:01 PM
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The flight model helicopter has flown in the simulation chamber! https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2019-052

No more test flights until Mars, it looks like....
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SpaceListener
post Mar 30 2019, 09:13 PM
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QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Mar 28 2019, 03:01 PM) *
The flight model helicopter has flown in the simulation chamber! https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2019-052

No more test flights until Mars, it looks like....


I thought that a drone is better than an helicopter due to its greater stability and maneuverability flight. Hope that the flight model also includes the flight control to Martian sand storms and air swirls.

About the navigation control, what instrument is using in order to avoid any geology obstacle.

Finally, it's is important that the helicopter has own recover method after a soft landing accident. Nobody will help it to put on the line but the Rover's arm must be capable to arrange it .
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mcaplinger
post Mar 31 2019, 12:57 AM
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QUOTE (SpaceListener @ Mar 30 2019, 01:13 PM) *
I thought that a drone is better than an helicopter due to its greater stability and maneuverability flight...
About the navigation control, what instrument is using in order to avoid any geology obstacle... Nobody will help it to put on the line but the Rover's arm must be capable to arrange it .

If by "drone" you mean a multirotor of some kind, these are not as stable if a motor fails than the two-rotor coaxial configuration of this vehicle, nor as power-efficient.

I presume there's a camera for whatever hazard avoidance and autonomy the helicopter has.

Finally, there are no plans to do anything with the arm. If the helicopter lands badly, that's the end of its mission. It does have fairly wide-stance, high-clearance landing gear to protect against tipovers and bad landings.


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Disclaimer: This post is based on public information only. Any opinions are my own.
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SpaceListener
post Mar 31 2019, 04:33 PM
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Thanks, Mcaplinger!

Anyway, it is a very challenging engineering project! It is pioneering technology, and after a successful mission, it will form the foundation for more capable helicopters for more ambitious future purposes such as to carry small sample caches back to a Mars ascent vehicle for the return to Earth.

The MHS must overcome many obstacles to meet the Martian weather (cold and vast temperature variation, high radiations, winds) and carrying many technologies, using a cellular microprocessor -Snapdragon- for photography, navigation orientation (no magnetic but depends to Sun tracker a camera coupled with to the JPL's visual inertial navigation system along with some additional inputs that might include gyros, visual odometry, tilt sensors, altimeter, and hazard detectors. The solar panels, I suspect, will be on the top of a helix and will carry Sony Li-ion batteries which will provide up to 220 W of energy.

Hope for a success laboratory! The helicopter can fly in Titan, Venus (I don't think it is feasible for such high temperature), and what else planet or moon the MHS can fly?
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