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Uranus and/or Neptune Exploration
Jackbauer
post Jun 13 2017, 07:41 PM
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ICE GIANTS PRE-DECADAL STUDY FINAL REPORT
(NASA)

https://twitter.com/jjfplanet/status/874366189622796288
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antipode
post Jun 13 2017, 10:43 PM
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Golly, now lets see what comes of it.
I'll be in my rocking chair if and when these things deliver but my god they are needed.

P
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stevesliva
post Jun 16 2017, 08:53 PM
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To ensure that the most productive mission is flown, we recommend the following:
An orbiter with probe be flown to one of the ice giants
The orbiter carry a payload between 90 and 150 kg
The probe carry at minimum a mass spectrometer and atmospheric pressure, temperature,
and density sensors
The development of eMMRTGs and HEEET be completed as planned
Two-planet, two-spacecraft mission options be explored further

Launch would be 2030, arrival 2043 for Neptune
Launch would be 2031, arrival 2043 for Uranus

All of the above: Orbiter and Probe for both projected to cost $3.671B ... $125M per year for the next 30 years.
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Decepticon
post Jun 16 2017, 09:37 PM
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I get sad seeing those dates. I don't know if I'll be on earth anymore to observe those missions.

Uranus moons have so much to show us still.
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Explorer1
post Jun 16 2017, 11:59 PM
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A launch on the SLS to avoid a bunch of inner solar system gravity assists would speed the trip up.
Trouble is, getting to the ice giants faster means using more delta-v to slow down, as the paper notes. There must be some good balance of the two pressures. We can always hope for a propulsion breakthrough...
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craigmcg
post Jun 17 2017, 12:43 PM
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This week's Planetary Radio also mentioned briefly that there was an option to fly Cassini to Uranus, although she characterized it as a "1%" option.

http://www.planetary.org/multimedia/planet...er-cassini.html
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Explorer1
post Jun 17 2017, 02:29 PM
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There were a number of such concepts for Cassini EOM. More details here (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/opag/march_08_meeting/presentations/spilker.pdf)
20 (!) years to get to Uranus after Saturn escape! Easier to just go from Earth with a whole new mission.
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tedstryk
post Jun 21 2017, 09:41 PM
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QUOTE (stevesliva @ Jun 16 2017, 08:53 PM) *
Launch would be 2030, arrival 2043 for Neptune
Launch would be 2031, arrival 2043 for Uranus


Brings new meaning to, "When I'm 64" (or 63 if it's early in the year).


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Explorer1
post Jun 22 2017, 10:02 PM
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On the bright side, if a orbiter is at Neptune in April 2046 with a good imager, it will have quite the show: http://xplanet.sourceforge.net/Gallery/20460429_jupiter/
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James S.
post Jun 22 2017, 10:15 PM
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QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Jun 22 2017, 05:02 PM) *
On the bright side, if a orbiter is at Neptune in April 2046 with a good imager, it will have quite the show: http://xplanet.sourceforge.net/Gallery/20460429_jupiter/

That would be awesome. I'll be 79 if I'm still alive.


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Axes Grind and Maces Clash!
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