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Voyager Interstellar Record
mcaplinger
post Sep 18 2017, 01:47 AM
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QUOTE (AstroJustin @ Sep 17 2017, 03:21 PM) *
Did voyager bring a record player along with it?

Asked and answered: http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=8334


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hendric
post Nov 27 2017, 11:44 PM
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With the recent articles on the Voyager record, I took a look at the some of the pictures again and was struck by something odd.

Inner solar system picture

Outer solar system picture

On the 3rd line is the masses of the planets, relative to Earth. Everything looks fine, but when we get to Pluto it gets wonky. The mass of Pluto has changed over time, with it being 1/10 Me and changing to 1/100 Me right around the Voyager launch time, so either of those numbers should be there, but it looks like they used 9/10 Me?

The images match the JPL versions at Voyager - Images on the Golden Record


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fredk
post Nov 28 2017, 01:12 AM
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And Pluto's semimajor axis is out by a factor of ten. They were in a rush when they put this together.
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Phil Stooke
post Nov 28 2017, 07:19 AM
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" The mass of Pluto has changed over time, with it being 1/10 Me and changing to 1/100 Me right around the Voyager launch time"

Yes indeed. Pluto has been getting less massive ever since it was discovered, if not before. I dimly recall a great little article - I think it was in New Scientist decades ago, but could be wrong - that plotted the mass estimates against time and predicted that Pluto would disappear altogether fairly soon. Can anyone find that little gem?

Phil


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PaulH51
post Nov 28 2017, 11:08 AM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Nov 28 2017, 03:19 PM) *
Can anyone find that little gem?


Maybe they were referring to this paper? From the ridiculous to the sublime: The pending disappearance of Pluto (1980)


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Floyd
post Nov 28 2017, 12:56 PM
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Link broken


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fredk
post Nov 28 2017, 03:50 PM
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That is a classic. They fit mass estimates to a cosine function of time raised to the pi power and predict Pluto will vanish in 1984. They say this event will be welcomed by some - "we will no longer have to tolerate Pluto's eccentricities"! After 1984, the mass becomes complex, with negative real part ("this idea may seem repellant to some"). "Pluto will reappear as a real planet in 2256".

This is written very much in the style of April Fool's papers of recent years. Here's a good example in a similar vein: using historical estimates of the value of pi to shockingly conclude that its value is changing with time:

https://arxiv.org/abs/0903.5321
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djellison
post Nov 28 2017, 05:58 PM
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I can prove, with data, that by the mid 2030s - there will not be time for sporting events. Singing the national anthem is taking longer and longer...soon, it'll last hours and everyone will have to go home afterwards.

I call the step change in the 1980s the Whitney Houston Discontinuity.

Then again - the same math proved that ExoMars was accelerating into the future and therefore wouldn't fly before the heat death of the universe....so...you know..... wink.gif
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hendric
post Nov 28 2017, 08:45 PM
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Ah, OK, I was thinking if they were known mistakes they'd be listed on the Wiki page. I knew they were rushed, and it almost didn't make it because of the motto on the cover, but didn't realize they were *that* rushed.


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