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kuiper belt map?, does it exist?
Guest_cassioli_*
post Dec 16 2009, 09:29 AM
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I just read about new WISE mission been launched to look for objects in KP and over there, and this question came to my mind: does it exist a map of kuiper belt objects? I have not so much clear how Pluto is located up there; I always imagined it just as a planet alone in its orbit, but , as far as I can understand now, there's actually something more similar to the asteroid belt among mars and jupiter; is this correct? Any picture of it?
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ngunn
post Dec 16 2009, 10:50 AM
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This is from the IAU Minor Planet Center:

http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/iau/plot/Outer.gif

EDIT And here's how to navigate to that, and much else besides:

Search: IAU Minor Planets Center
(scroll down to)
Lists and Plots
tabulations and plots
*Minor Planets
(scroll down again)
Plots of the Solar System
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ElkGroveDan
post Dec 16 2009, 03:11 PM
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That's the site I was going to send you to. There's a lot of good stuff there:
http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/iau/Animations/Animations.html

For the most part I'd call these more diagrams than maps. The job of actually mapping the Kuiper belt would be a bit like taking a census of the oceans' krill.


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kwp
post Dec 16 2009, 05:09 PM
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QUOTE (ElkGroveDan @ Dec 16 2009, 08:11 AM) *
That's the site I was going to send you to. There's a lot of good stuff there:
http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/iau/Animations/Animations.html


Some amazing examples of observer bias there. First, what a coincidence that the periapsis of all of the highly eccentric Kuiper belt objects happen to be around the last decade! Must have been some big party in the inner solar system about then. Second, what a sad coincidence that Pluto is moving into the one blank region of the Kuiper belt right about when New Horizons will be winging past.

-Kevin
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YesRushGen
post Dec 16 2009, 05:38 PM
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QUOTE (kwp @ Dec 16 2009, 12:09 PM) *
Some amazing examples of observer bias there. First, what a coincidence that the periapsis of all of the highly eccentric Kuiper belt objects happen to be around the last decade! Must have been some big party in the inner solar system about then.


Yep, a big party of new discoveries! laugh.gif

QUOTE
Second, what a sad coincidence that Pluto is moving into the one blank region of the Kuiper belt right about when New Horizons will be winging past.


I believe that region is in the direction of the galactic core, which is difficult to observe.
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maschnitz
post Dec 16 2009, 05:41 PM
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Also, I seem to remember our current knowledge of the Kuiper Belt is very Northern-Hemisphere- and ecliptic-biased, since that's where the surveys have concentrated so far.

A side view might look similarly odd.
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Guest_cassioli_*
post Dec 16 2009, 05:51 PM
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I found some incredible links:
http://www.johnstonsarchive.net/astro/tnoslist.html

Couldn't even image such plenty of objects!!!



I didn't even know that a dwarf planet BIGGER than Pluto was found FIVE years ago blink.gif , and that Pluto tself has THREE moons rather than 1!!
http://epsc.wustl.edu/classwork/classwork_...21-RingsIce.pdf

I was still stuck in the "8planets+asteroids belt" model ! unsure.gif
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ngunn
post Dec 16 2009, 06:46 PM
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QUOTE (cassioli @ Dec 16 2009, 05:51 PM) *
plenty of objects!!!


I'm just as excited as you are, cassioli, even after watching the discoveries unfold bit by bit. Once you've taken in the Kuiper belt don't forget to check out Sedna!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/90377_Sedna
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elakdawalla
post Dec 16 2009, 07:20 PM
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What planet have you been on, cassioli?? rolleyes.gif

This site is not a bad place to keep up with such discoveries; also check out Mike Brown's blog and twitter feed.
http://twitter.com/plutokiller
http://www.mikebrownsplanets.com/
Since Mike and his students are responsible for a great many of those discoveries.


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Floyd
post Dec 16 2009, 09:08 PM
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WISE should add hundreds of new objects. Doesn't matter if they are black and reflect almost no sunlight, they only have to be warm relative to solid hydrogen. smile.gif


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Guest_cassioli_*
post Dec 17 2009, 07:58 AM
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QUOTE (Floyd @ Dec 16 2009, 09:08 PM) *
WISE should add hundreds of new objects. Doesn't matter if they are black and reflect almost no sunlight, they only have to be warm relative to solid hydrogen. smile.gif

I thought that, too, but then I've been told it can only detect bodies with internal heat source, as it can't see "below" 70K. huh.gif Is that true? They also say that it couldn't even detect eatrh, which is 35 K (???)

Does it exist a solar system map like this one, but which also depicts oort, kuiper, scattered and so on?
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_QIN9Dot7WZg/SpHH...00/IMG_9436.JPG

Not in detail, of course, just to have an idea.
It would be cool if it was big enough to be printed as a poster...
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remcook
post Dec 17 2009, 08:28 AM
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I think the heat source refers to objects outside our solar system that are not reflecting starlight, like Brown Dwarfs. Surely we should see objects like Pluto, which doesn't have a heat source but can be seen from Earth with 'normal' telescopes. I'm looking forward to the WISE results smile.gif
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ngunn
post Dec 17 2009, 09:36 AM
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QUOTE (cassioli @ Dec 17 2009, 07:58 AM) *
eatrh, which is 35 K


Not sure about where you live, but it's a tad over 273 K in Wales this morning.
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Floyd
post Dec 17 2009, 11:13 AM
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Coldest night of the year in the Boston area, with the wind chill it feels like 35K. smile.gif


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Guest_cassioli_*
post Dec 17 2009, 12:04 PM
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QUOTE (ngunn @ Dec 17 2009, 09:36 AM) *
Not sure about where you live, but it's a tad over 273 K in Wales this morning.

that's what I think: how can Earth be 35K? Shouldn't it be 300K???

Maybe they refer to far objects the same size of the earth..
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