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Rosetta - Post Separation Ops at Comet 67P C-G, November 14, 2014 -
chuck0
post Oct 1 2016, 10:29 AM
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(edit)
moved the post into correct thread.
(edit)

Anyways, this was really an exciting mission to watch since it was so dynamic!
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ollopa
post Oct 1 2016, 10:59 PM
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QUOTE (Tom Tamlyn @ Sep 30 2016, 10:48 PM) *
The OSIRIS reference paper, posted here, says this about the wide angle camera:

On <ahem> April 1 of this year, the OSIRIS team posted an image of the principal investigator taken by the wide angle camera’s ground reference unit at a distance of 15 meters: https://planetgate.mps.mpg.de/Image_of_the_...016-04-01a.html

To my eye the test image looks less fuzzy than the actual final image, but the test image might not have been compressed, and of course the conditions and subject matter were different.

Congratulations and thanks to the team, and to the people who wrote about the mission for us.



I think you may be making an interesting point (prepare for lay-person reporting). I know nothing about imaging, but Holger did say yesterday that he was surprised that the last image was somewhat more in focus than the immediate predecessors. He seemed to say that they did not really know the effect of removing the filters and would need to look at this to understand the last few frames.
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mcaplinger
post Oct 1 2016, 11:34 PM
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QUOTE (Tom Tamlyn @ Sep 30 2016, 02:48 PM) *
To my eye the test image looks less fuzzy than the actual final image...

There's no reason to think that their ground unit is focused identically to the flight unit, especially for distances well inside the requirements.


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Disclaimer: This post is based on public information only. Any opinions are my own.
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wildespace
post Oct 2 2016, 10:46 AM
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Sleep well, Rosetta, we will miss you. smile.gif

Attached Image


I particularly love this descent image Rosetta took (enhanced by Ted Stryk)

Attached Image


Could somebody please "drop" an astronaut into this image, for scale reference, just like it was done with MSL pictures.


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Paolo
post Oct 2 2016, 12:00 PM
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QUOTE (wildespace @ Oct 2 2016, 12:46 PM) *
Could somebody please "drop" an astronaut into this image, for scale reference, just like it was done with MSL pictures.


the pixel scale, according to ESA, is about 30 cm/pixel, so the astronaut would be about 6 pixels tall
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Phil Stooke
post Oct 2 2016, 04:02 PM
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https://www.reddit.com/r/space/comments/55a...nts_a_human_to/


Someone already did this (the tiny red line is on top of the cliff).

Somewhere there's a picture of this with the ISS to scale, but I can't find it right now.

Phil


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alex_k
post Oct 4 2016, 01:52 PM
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An attempt to process the last Rosetta's image

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Spock1108
post Oct 4 2016, 06:32 PM
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Inspired by the work of Roman Tkachenko I made this photo where I compare the size and details of the various photos in high resolution taken during the Rosetta-Philae mission. As we can see the latest pictures of Rosetta it is much closer to those taken by philae landed it during the descent ....

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chuck0
post Oct 4 2016, 07:47 PM
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These sharpened images (as well as Philaes descent sequence) show pretty nicely how the stuff which looks like sand from far away is more like rubble close up.
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Roman Tkachenko
post Oct 7 2016, 09:45 AM
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QUOTE (Spock1108 @ Oct 4 2016, 10:32 PM) *
Inspired by the work of Roman Tkachenko I made this photo where I compare the size and details of the various photos in high resolution taken during the Rosetta-Philae mission.


Great job!


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