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Jupiter Approach, Until JOI
mcaplinger
post Jan 7 2016, 12:19 AM
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Today is Jupiter Orbit Insertion (JOI) minus 180 days. 53.5 days after JOI, Juno will make its next close pass to Jupiter, and that's when we expect to get the first good images from Junocam, although there may be some imaging during approach and earlier on the first orbit.


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Gerald
post Jan 7 2016, 02:06 PM
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QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Jan 7 2016, 01:19 AM) *
Today is Jupiter Orbit Insertion (JOI) minus 180 days...

An excerpt of this paper with the adjusted perijove times:
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propguy
post Jan 12 2016, 11:44 PM
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Coincidentally I took the attached photo at work the same day this topic was created. JOI used to seem so far off, but now it is just around the corner. Lots of test runs to review plus lots of planning work to go. July 4th will be a very long but fun night!

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Explorer1
post Jan 13 2016, 02:22 AM
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Even if Juno doesn't take many images during approach, the other instruments will be active to detect entry into the magnetosphere, correct? Any idea when that would happened (I know the magnetic field is gigantic, but not sure exactly how large).
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ZLD
post Jan 13 2016, 03:58 AM
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Using some rough math, I would say late March on into April there should be some detection of the magnetosphere.


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elakdawalla
post Jan 13 2016, 03:58 AM
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Juno does plan to take some images during approach. They have to turn off all the science instruments 5 days before JOI.


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mcaplinger
post Jan 13 2016, 02:55 PM
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QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Jan 12 2016, 07:58 PM) *
Juno does plan to take some images during approach.

Certainly, but at a range of 5.2e6 km on JOI-5d, Jupiter is about 40 pixels across, so they won't be great images. [Junocam, maybe JIRAM does better.]

Handy formula: Junocam Jupiter size in pixels ~ 210/d, d in millions of km

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Explorer1
post Jan 14 2016, 05:13 AM
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Juno just set a new record for solar power distance, beating out Rosetta's hibernation phase. Very impressive!
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4818
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propguy
post Feb 4 2016, 04:15 PM
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Juno performed TCM11 yesterday. All went as planned. Juno is now aimed at the Jupiter insertion point!

NASA's Juno Spacecraft Burns for Jupiter
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mcaplinger
post Feb 4 2016, 07:12 PM
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BTW, I ran across this technical description of JIRAM -- http://www.ifsi-roma.inaf.it/jiram/downloa...Tech%20note.pdf -- that has some detail about how the instrument works. Its IFOV is about 2.8 times finer than Junocam's, so at JOI-5d Jupiter should be about 112 pixels across.

I haven't seen any inflight imaging from JIRAM yet. According to http://www.lpi.usra.edu/opag/jul2013/prese...o_efb_plans.pdf images were supposed to be taken of the Moon during EFB.


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Glenn Orton
post Feb 18 2016, 10:34 PM
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A Google tabular site has been created that displays observations planned by the Juno investigations, together with Earth-based supporting observations: https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/planned-observations.

This will be regularly updated by the Juno science team and by the supporting observers.
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JohnVV
post Feb 22 2016, 01:03 AM
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a few renders from the July 4 close approach



a very EARLY spice orbit add on and not yet using the spacecraft SPICE rotation yet

Celestia ,then will come the Cosmographia SPICE build add on
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Gerald
post May 23 2016, 11:53 AM
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Back from the Côte d'Azur in France, I see that the PDF versions of most of the talks of the Europlanet workshop: "Juno Ground-Based Support from Amateurs: Science and Public Impact", are already online.

Most of the sessions have been recorded by video. Providing the recordings online is pending.

(As a personal note: This has been a rare opportunity to find out that people you otherwise know only virtually via web are actually real! It seems, most of the participants shared this experience. Thanks to the orga-nice-rs, who made it possible! smile.gif )
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algorithm
post May 23 2016, 07:33 PM
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Nice pics, Looks like you had a great time with like minded people.

You are right, it's always nice to match a face with an online 'personality' smile.gif
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Explorer1
post May 30 2016, 08:21 PM
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Entering 'Jupiter space' (by the standard of gravitational influence) https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/news.
Crossing the magnetosphere should be soon as well, I'm assuming? If the instruments are on they should detect the transition.
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