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Juno at Jupiter, mission events as they unfold
Mr Valiant
post Jul 13 2016, 10:53 AM
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Oh, the Great (but elusive) Red Spot. For us part time amateur astronomers (work, clouds, weather etc)
our friend is very shy. About 2 months ago, peering through a fellow Society members, nice 10" f5 Newtonian,
it was a case of bullseye.
There it was, just coming into view on the eastern limb. For me, being absent due to the above
factors, it was several years. For others, it was first time or more than 20 years. Has the spot livened up
or was the weather at our deep sky site ideal and the timing spot on. Also, initially I could see only 3 of the
Galilean moons. But one of our young members, accessing SkySafari, said there should be 4. Fair enough,
closer inspection saw Europa in conjunction with Io. Over a matter of half an hour, they slowly drew apart.
Maybe not Juno, but definitely Jupiter, King of the Planets.
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Marvin
post Jul 13 2016, 12:38 PM
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There is a higher resolution version here:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/images...20707_hires.jpg

I can't wait till late August to see closer images. I wonder if Jupiter has a polar hexagon like Saturn...
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Gerald
post Jul 13 2016, 03:06 PM
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This makes me feeling a mix of happy, curious, excited, and nervous:
Juno Sends First In-orbit View:
QUOTE
"... JunoCam ... survived its first pass through Jupiter's extreme radiation environment without any degradation ..."

The Juno team is currently working to place all images taken by JunoCam on the mission's website, where the public can access them.

Hope, the EDRs will be included, and I'll be able to process them appropriately. MSSS seems to be able to provide excellent results, so I'm a bit more relaxed, that not all the processing is going to depend on me.
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Glenn Orton
post Jul 14 2016, 09:57 PM
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I'm happy to report that, so far as I know, all instruments on the Juno spacecraft are reported to be healthy.

The mission folks will run a JOI-cleanup orbit-trim maneuver (OTM) on July 13. Its performance will determine if we need a subsequent OTM on July 27, 4 days before apojove. That maneuver is not necessarily required; it depends on how the cleanup OTM goes. If we did well enough with the July 13 cleanup OTM, then the July 27 OTM will be cancelled, and the mission will live with a little bit of discrepancy in the PJ1 longitude and timing (probably just a few seconds and less than a degree of longitude).
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nprev
post Jul 15 2016, 07:04 AM
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Good shooting, Glenn! smile.gif


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stevesliva
post Jul 15 2016, 04:53 PM
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QUOTE (Glenn Orton @ Jul 14 2016, 05:57 PM) *
... the mission will live with a little bit of discrepancy in the PJ1 longitude and timing (probably just a few seconds and less than a degree of longitude).


After I figured out what PJ meant, I had to think, "At what point does exclaiming 'By Jove I think we got it!' after an OTM become a tired joke?" Probably wore that one out during the 90s with Galileo.
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Phil Stooke
post Jul 15 2016, 09:47 PM
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Pioneer 10. Trust me!

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elakdawalla
post Jul 18 2016, 11:01 PM
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WOOOOO APPROACH MOVIE RAWS


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mcaplinger
post Jul 19 2016, 01:48 AM
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Be warned that these all-spin images are large (1648 wide by 128*3*82 high) and mostly black, though the PNG format compresses them reasonably well.

Here's a graphic that describes the processing flow at a very basic level. Note that for the movie we just aligned the images in the three colors, there was no additional geometric processing.

Enjoy!

Attached Image


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Gerald
post Jul 19 2016, 12:45 PM
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Those images are great! You can actually see features rotating with Jupiter, easiest the Great Red Spot, but more.
Here crops of processed versions of the lossless images 1586 and 1588:
Attached Image
Attached Image

and as 2-images animated gif:
Attached Image

The gif is rather lossy, so comparing the two above images is recommended.

Processing parameters:
Attached File  JNCE_2016181_00C1586_V01_sc1468.0_brown_3.839251e_8_2.6e_15_zRot_0.002_rot80.46_120px.BMP.LBL ( 1.22K ) Number of downloads: 74

Attached File  JNCE_2016181_00C1588_V01_sc1468.0_brown_3.839251e_8_2.6e_15_zRot_0.002_rot80.46_120px.BMP.LBL ( 1.22K ) Number of downloads: 69
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elakdawalla
post Jul 20 2016, 08:00 PM
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I'm trying to figure out how best to serve up these data to make them more accessible to people.

To begin with, here is an Excel spreadsheet containing all the information stripped from all the headers.
https://planetary.s3.amazonaws.com/data/jun...h_metadata.xlsx

I'd like to examine the images one by one to look for cool things like moon shadows on the planet, but it's a little tedious because of the images' great lengths. I thought that as I went through the photos I'd chop out the framelets of most interest, but I can't decide whether to leave the cropped images grayscale or to colorize them according to whether they're the red, green, or blue framelets. Would anyone here use either product if I went to the trouble of posting such crops? See attached for two examples. Each is the same crop from JNCE_2016181_00C1585_V01, containing 6 RGB triplets around the image of Jupiter and its moons. One has been colorized, one not.
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
Attached Image
 


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Gerald
post Jul 20 2016, 09:21 PM
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Currently, I'm working on overview products like this preliminary one, in this case consisting of 30 roughly processed images (1307 to 1336):

Attached Image

Tomorrow I'll try to adjust the positions, as needed for movies or for stacking.
To obtain the crops, I first create a processed full swath with 6 pixels per degree, then look for the position of Jupiter, in order to know which crop to define for hires images. This is almost fully automated; I'm extending this automation to further processing. Processing of the full dataset of 1200 images will take about one day per run (about one minute per image).
I'd think, that eventually different types of products will be required for different purposes. This includes the narrow crops with focus on Jupiter, map projections, wider views including the Galilean satellites, up to the whole swathes for counting radiation, or looking for other satellites.
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mcaplinger
post Jul 20 2016, 09:28 PM
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QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Jul 20 2016, 12:00 PM) *
I thought that as I went through the photos I'd chop out the framelets of most interest, but I can't decide whether to leave the cropped images grayscale or to colorize them according to whether they're the red, green, or blue framelets.

If you do the latter then it's a little more obvious which band is which, and people can get into Photoshop and hand-register the images, though I sure hope no one is obsessive enough to do all 1400 images by hand that way!

We considered putting out only the framelets containing the planet and a few surrounding ones, but raw is raw. My processing generates color-registered 800x400 images and throws all intermediate products away. We thought the 800x400s were too processed, though most people would probably be better served by something like that.

See http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive...r-space/491963/ for an interesting take on the raw data release.


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Gerald
post Jul 20 2016, 10:23 PM
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For those who can't wait, here preliminary renditions of images 1310 to 1449.
10x reduced:
Attached Image


...And I'm convinced, that it has been a good decision to publish the full EDRs. Otherwise you always get the discussion, that NASA would be hiding something. And you never know what's serendipitiously waiting to be discovered outside the primary objectives.
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elakdawalla
post Jul 20 2016, 11:04 PM
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QUOTE (Gerald @ Jul 20 2016, 01:21 PM) *
Currently, I'm working on overview products like this preliminary one, in this case consisting of 30 roughly processed images (1307 to 1336):

Attached Image

These are terrific. I'm in need of some kind of thumbnail product I can use as a visual index to the files, so whenever you produce something that covers the entire data set, please share it with me!

QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Jul 20 2016, 01:28 PM) *
We considered putting out only the framelets containing the planet and a few surrounding ones, but raw is raw. My processing generates color-registered 800x400 images and throws all intermediate products away. We thought the 800x400s were too processed, though most people would probably be better served by something like that.

I agree that if you're required to choose among options, the rawest option is the best option because it allows the greatest flexibility. But why limit it to just one option? I'd love to get my hands on your 800x400 versions as well!


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