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Juno perijove 4, February 2, 2017
Roman Tkachenko
post Feb 6 2017, 08:56 AM
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Jupiter's South Pole (PJ-4)


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PaulH51
post Feb 6 2017, 09:12 AM
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QUOTE (Roman Tkachenko @ Feb 6 2017, 04:56 PM) *
Jupiter's South Pole

Nice smile.gif


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mcaplinger
post Feb 8 2017, 07:45 PM
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QUOTE (Roman Tkachenko @ Feb 4 2017, 10:07 AM) *
The Pearl of Jupiter

Thanks, Roman. It's images like this one that keep me going in the face of all the negative clueless remarks on reddit about the supposed "mediocrity" of Junocam.


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Gerald
post Feb 9 2017, 12:14 AM
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This is a 5-fold reduced full version of the PJ04 "Radiation Trend Monitoring" image:
Attached Image

This is an enhanced crop of the same image:
Attached Image

Mediocre? I wonder, which other camera in a high-radiation environment on a spinning spacecraft would be able to produce images of a similar quality.
Those remarks can only be based on temporary lack of knowledge. I'm sure, by now, they are happy to be proven wrong.
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nprev
post Feb 9 2017, 01:58 AM
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Mike, your 'mediocre' camera is beyond the wildest dreams of achievement of any random hundred thousand anonymous nay-sayers combined, plus their mommies.

We UMSFers value your work tremendously. smile.gif


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Gerald
post Feb 9 2017, 09:03 PM
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Selected PJ04 Approach Movie RGB images.
Enhanced crop of #73, north up:
Attached Image
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Gerald
post Feb 13 2017, 09:18 PM
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The first 20 PJ-04 Departure Movie images.
These drafts are without considering spacecraft motion or Jupiter shape model.
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PhilipTerryGraha...
post Feb 14 2017, 03:26 PM
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QUOTE (nprev @ Feb 9 2017, 12:58 PM) *
Mike, your 'mediocre' camera is beyond the wildest dreams of achievement of any random hundred thousand anonymous nay-sayers combined, plus their mommies.

We UMSFers value your work tremendously. smile.gif


Ditto. Despite the people complaining over at the subreddit, I'm sure they're a vocal minority and the rest of us are also appreciative of the work you guys do. smile.gif


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mcaplinger
post Feb 14 2017, 05:41 PM
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QUOTE (PhilipTerryGraham @ Feb 14 2017, 07:26 AM) *
Despite the people complaining over at the subreddit, I'm sure they're a vocal minority...

My suspicion is that people just look at the basically-raw images on missionjuno and compare them to the best, most heavily-processed press releases from Voyager or Galileo. And they also likely can't tell what the scale of any particular image is -- all Junocam images are limb-to-limb, even the highest-resolution ones, and the maximum resolution is only achieved at the center of the image. If I had the time I would process some high-res Voyager images and compare them to the Junocam images -- in most places Jupiter is pretty bland at the km scale.


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PhilipTerryGraha...
post Feb 14 2017, 07:13 PM
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QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Feb 15 2017, 04:41 AM) *
My suspicion is that people just look at the basically-raw images on missionjuno and compare them to the best, most heavily-processed press releases from Voyager or Galileo.


It's actually they've been mostly comparing JunoCam to Cassini's ISS and New Horizons' LORRI in particular. The people plaguing the comments often complain that JunoCam's pics aren't as "impressive" or "stunning" as images from Cassini or New Horizons. The best I could do was simply say that each camera was built to serve different purposes; I'm not one to start arguments on reddit, especially when I'm supposed to be a neutral moderator. unsure.gif


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Explorer1
post Feb 14 2017, 08:58 PM
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Say they are lucky to get any images at all, and that a camera was almost not even included! Otherwise Juno would be about as well known to the public as Ulysses was.
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mcaplinger
post Feb 14 2017, 09:53 PM
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QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Feb 14 2017, 12:58 PM) *
Say they are lucky to get any images at all, and that a camera was almost not even included!

That sort of argument just feeds into the notion that Junocam is somehow inferior. It's not inferior, it's just different. The driving requirement was to be able to image the full disc of Jupiter from above the pole, which led to a very wide field of view, utterly unlike the instruments that it's being compared to.


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PhilipTerryGraha...
post Feb 19 2017, 07:07 AM
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An interesting question was brought up by my friend from ANU when he saw the images of Ganymede's shadow - will there ever be a time in the mission where JunoCam will be able to observe a transit shadow up close or, better yet, fly into the shadow of a transit during a perijove? ohmy.gif


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jccwrt
post Feb 19 2017, 07:21 PM
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I took a look a while back, but that was still when the mission was planning to run 14-day orbits.

Since the moons' orbital planes are inclined to the ecliptic and Jupiter's equatorial plane, Callisto's shadow doesn't currently fall on the planet and won't do so again until sometime around 2020. The track of Ganymede's shadow is also edging north and will continue producing shorter eclipses until about the middle of next year when the eclipse tracks start drifting south again. There should be a series of Ganymede eclipses occurring near the north pole around then.

Europa's eclipse track is currently located along the North Temperate Belt, while Io's is located along the northern edge of the North Equatorial Belt. Like Ganymede's eclipse track, they're also drifting north at the moment, but being closer to the planet, the track positions won't change as substantially.

Right now I'd say Ganymede and Europa have the best chance for close eclipse photos, given the smaller field of view at lower latitudes and the lower likelihood of Io's shadow catching JunoCam's eye during a perijove pass. There's a very tiny chance that the shadows of Amalthea would be visible during a JunoCam pass. I'd need an updated list of perijove encounter times, but it should be trivial to determine if Juno could see eclipses up close.
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Gerald
post Feb 19 2017, 10:05 PM
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PJ05 is 2017 MAR 27 08:52:14 (according to SPICE spk file juno_pred_orbit.orb). The later perijoves haven't yet been determined, when I checked for it about two weeks ago.
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