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MSL Video
Tesheiner
post Jun 7 2006, 04:12 PM
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No trick (follow the link clicking on the image); remember that a polished metal plate acts as a mirror. smile.gif
But don't ask me which IDD instrument is that black box (Mossbauer maybe?)
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jamescanvin
post Jun 8 2006, 12:43 AM
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I think it's the electorincs box for the micro imager. There are similar shiny boxes next to all the cameras.


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Guest_BruceMoomaw_*
post Jun 8 2006, 01:37 AM
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Guests






There's no Mossbauer this time. Indeed, one surprise in the MSL payload is the total absence of any devoted mineralogical instruments on MSL other than the X-ray diffractometer that requires the actual ingestion and grinding of samples -- no Mossbauer, no Raman, no near-IR or thermal-IR spectrometer (although the flash spectrometers for ChemCam can do some reflection-spectrum work as well). The only two instruments on the arm are the color microscopic camera and a near-duplicate of the APX element spectrometer from the MER rovers (which, I've been told, is there largely as a backup in case ChemCam doesn't work as well as predicted).
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hendric
post Jul 15 2006, 05:22 AM
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Still no EDL video?? I'd like to add it to my collection.


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gndonald
post Jul 17 2006, 03:58 PM
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QUOTE (Chmee @ Jun 7 2006, 04:21 AM) *
cool.gif--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Toma B @ Jun 6 2006, 01:55 PM) *</div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->
Looks to me like there is some work to be done on that rendering like adding RTG's...
It is strange that nearly every image of MSL has it without its RTG. Very strange, is it expected to be powered by dark energy? smile.gif

Probably they keep it out of the publicity images to keep a lower profile since there are some groups that adamantly oppose *anything* nuclear. Even peaceful scientific missions...

Also, the camera on the mast surprises me. Would they not have two camera's for binocular vision? How can they tell distances without it?


I could have sworn that there were some pictures that did show the probe with RTGs fitted, which made it look somewhat like a bombardeer beetle, but they seem to have disappeared from the net unless someone has copies.
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PhilHorzempa
post Aug 1 2006, 03:43 AM
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Any updates on the MSL entry and landing video?

Also, has anyone heard if JPL/NASA has chosen a snappy name,
for the MSL yet? Perhaps, something like Phoenix or Ares or
Lance Armstrong?


Another Phil
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Jim from NSF.com
post Aug 1 2006, 11:45 AM
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QUOTE (PhilHorzempa @ Jul 31 2006, 11:43 PM) *


Any updates on the MSL entry and landing video?

Also, has anyone heard if JPL/NASA has chosen a snappy name,
for the MSL yet? Perhaps, something like Phoenix or Ares or
Lance Armstrong?
Another Phil


Will be getting another opportunity this week to see the video again. Will try to get it.

Phoenix was the name of the project from since its proposal. ARES is an acronym. It is too early for MSL
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PhilHorzempa
post Aug 2 2006, 04:59 AM
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For those interested in MSL's RTG system, here is the link
to a great paper summarizing the design. It looks like
they have it figured it out, at least in the engineering world.
Perhaps, it is the world of politics, or the availability
of Plutonium, or both, that is holding back
a definite decision.

http://marstech.jpl.nasa.gov/publications/...-2005-01-28.pdf



Another Phil
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angel1801
post Aug 2 2006, 09:47 AM
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Russia has said to the US that the US can buy Plutonium-238 for $2000 per gram from Russia if and only if it is NOT used for any military purpose. Russia has lots of Plutonium-238 to give the US!

The US has said it will resume domestic production of Plutonium-238 as soon as possible.

It is most likely that there is a lot of political sensitivity to anything nuclear. Just look at the fuss over the Galileo, Cassini and New Horizons missions!

If we told the people that RTG's were used in the Viking landers, then I'm sure most of the fuss will go away.

Protestors are strange people. No one protested against the launch of the Voyager 1 & 2 probes. Why? Voyager 2 was launched on August 20, 1977, just 4 days after Elvis Presley died! And Voyager 1 launch date (on September 5, 1977) was during the immense grieving over his death!


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ljk4-1
post Aug 2 2006, 02:21 PM
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QUOTE (angel1801 @ Aug 2 2006, 05:47 AM) *
Protestors are strange people. No one protested against the launch of the Voyager 1 & 2 probes. Why? Voyager 2 was launched on August 20, 1977, just 4 days after Elvis Presley died! And Voyager 1 launch date (on September 5, 1977) was during the immense grieving over his death!


I recall one quite vocal anti-nuke protestor who was not only deeply
concerned that Cassini would somehow fly back to Earth and crash
on it after exploring Saturn but that during the probe's 1999 flyby of
Venus that NASA should have let the craft smash into the second
world from Sol because the planet had no atmosphere!

I was also told by a friend who attended an anti-Cassini (read anti-nuke)
group meeting in Cambridge, MA in 1997 (home to Harvard) that when
he tried to explain how safe Cassini's RTGs were even from an explosion
of the rocket, he was told they didn't want the facts because they had
already made up their minds that Cassini was dangerous and had to
be stopped.

After all that, any amount of sympathy I had with the anti-nuke groups
went right out the window.

BTW, Groucho Marx died around the same time as the Voyagers left
Earth and Elvis went into hiding, but sadly people didn't seem as upset
about his passing.


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and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
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no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

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Chmee
post Aug 2 2006, 05:24 PM
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QUOTE (PhilHorzempa @ Aug 2 2006, 12:59 AM) *
For those interested in MSL's RTG system, here is the link
to a great paper summarizing the design.
http://marstech.jpl.nasa.gov/publications/...-2005-01-28.pdf
Another Phil



The very interesting thing in this paper is that they state that thermal control will be maintained by pumping fluid heated from the RTG throughout the MSL.

Basically, MSL will be like a large car radiator! smile.gif This has to be a much simpler design than electrical heaters, but I worry about leaks that could happen (like my car's radiator ).
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climber
post Aug 2 2006, 07:54 PM
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QUOTE (Chmee @ Aug 2 2006, 07:24 PM) *
The very interesting thing in this paper is that they state that thermal control will be maintained by pumping fluid ....throughout the MSL.


OK, in this case we can name MSL : Lance Armstrong** tongue.gif


** see post #21


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dilo
post Aug 2 2006, 08:32 PM
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hmm.. "The working fluid is CFC-11".
I guess we do not have an ozone depletion issue on Mars (...probably we need a little more atmospheric oxygen rolleyes.gif )


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hendric
post Aug 2 2006, 09:41 PM
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QUOTE (Chmee @ Aug 2 2006, 12:24 PM) *
Basically, MSL will be like a large car radiator! smile.gif This has to be a much simpler design than electrical heaters, but I worry about leaks that could happen (like my car's radiator ).


Oddly enough, I would imagine it to be much more reliable than a car radiator:
  1. Smaller temperature change - The internal electronics are in a box, so I would expect the temperature change from day/night to be small compared to a car radiator's on/of.
  2. No jarring impact - Well, other than launch and landing, and falling off the odd rock. wink.gif But no speedbumps, hitting road debris at 70mph, etc.
  3. No bugs/rocks whacking into the radiator fins - smile.gif


--------------------
Space Enthusiast Richard Hendricks
--
"The engineers, as usual, made a tremendous fuss. Again as usual, they did the job in half the time they had dismissed as being absolutely impossible." --Rescue Party, Arthur C Clarke
Mother Nature is the final inspector of all quality.
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Jim from NSF.com
post Aug 3 2006, 04:20 AM
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QUOTE (PhilHorzempa @ Jul 31 2006, 11:43 PM) *


Any updates on the MSL entry and landing video?


Can't get it. It was on a DVD and not a .MOV file
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