IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

6 Pages V   1 2 3 > »   
Closed TopicStart new topic
Sol 150+, Time marches on...
Stu
post Oct 27 2008, 09:22 AM
Post #1


The Poet Dude
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 5551
Joined: 15-March 04
From: Kendal, Cumbria, UK
Member No.: 60



Sol 150 raws are up so this seems like a good time to start a new thread...

Hang on in there Phoenix...


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_Enceladus75_*
post Oct 27 2008, 11:21 AM
Post #2





Guests






Yes, it's heartening to see Phoenix last way past its original 90 day mission. I'd say Phoenix will make it to 180 sols - twice the length of the primary mission. I just hope that they switch the microphone on before the end. I can't wait to hear the sounds of Mars.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Oct 27 2008, 11:29 AM
Post #3


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 14153
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



Firstly - I'd urge caution on expecting any number of sols for survival. Another 30 sols is possible, but a long way from being certain.

Also - don't get too excited by the microphone. It may not work - and if it does - it will almost certainly be unspectacular. If you want to know what Mars sounds like - go and stand 100,000ft above the Sahara at 4 in the morning when there are no aircraft around.

Doug
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Stu
post Oct 27 2008, 12:05 PM
Post #4


The Poet Dude
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 5551
Joined: 15-March 04
From: Kendal, Cumbria, UK
Member No.: 60



I know there will probably be no real "background" sounds audible... no moaning martain wind, no rasp of dust grains trickling over the mic... but I'd settle for some clanks and clonks if they start banging those "Pots and pans" Peter Smith talked about... smile.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ant103
post Oct 27 2008, 05:27 PM
Post #5


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1504
Joined: 12-February 06
From: Bergerac - FR
Member No.: 678



Frost on this sol I think wink.gif



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Deimos
post Oct 27 2008, 09:43 PM
Post #6


Martian Photographer
***

Group: Members
Posts: 327
Joined: 3-March 05
Member No.: 183



I'll echo what Doug said. Every downlink is precious now. I'm not suggesting Phoenix cannot reach sol 180, but there will be many opportunities between now and then for the capricious weather to throw Phoenix into safe mode or worse. TEGA, RA, and RAC are now living on borrowed time, and we'll need to see a smooth transition to post-RA ops before we can contemplate sol 180. A solar-powered life above the Martian arctic circle is a hard life right about now.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
314karl
post Oct 27 2008, 10:07 PM
Post #7


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3
Joined: 21-September 07
Member No.: 3910



Full quote of previous post removed - Mod

Does anyone know of a website which shows the Earth date equivalent of the current Mars year? What is the Earth equivalent date and also sunrise-sunset times for the Phoenix landing site? Knowing this would make the changing season more easy to understand for us Earthlings.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
marsophile
post Oct 27 2008, 10:23 PM
Post #8


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 488
Joined: 10-September 08
Member No.: 4338



QUOTE (314karl @ Oct 27 2008, 02:07 PM) *
Does anyone know of a website which shows the Earth date equivalent of the current Mars year? What is the Earth equivalent date and also sunrise-sunset times for the Phoenix landing site? Knowing this would make the changing season more easy to understand for us Earthlings.


This year, by coincidence, the northern hemisphere summer solstice on both Earth and Mars differed by only a few days. The Martian year is close to two Earth Years. Therefore, the coming winter solstice on Earth will be close to the Mars fall equinox. So it is now late summer at the Phoenix site. But Mars weather probably doesn't have much of a lag following the seasons like Earth weather does. So even late summer is getting somewhat dicey.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elakdawalla
post Oct 27 2008, 11:45 PM
Post #9


Administrator
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 5151
Joined: 4-August 05
From: Pasadena, CA, USA, Earth
Member No.: 454



QUOTE (314karl @ Oct 27 2008, 02:07 PM) *
Does anyone know of a website which shows the Earth date equivalent of the current Mars year? What is the Earth equivalent date and also sunrise-sunset times for the Phoenix landing site? Knowing this would make the changing season more easy to understand for us Earthlings.

Download the Mars24 applet and you can find sunrise/set times and also the current solar longitude. Solar longitude counts up from 0 to 360, beginning from the northern vernal equinox at 0. Earth's northern vernal equinox is around March 20; every 30 degrees of Martian solar longitude is equal to about another "month." So here are (very rough) equivalent dates to Martian solar longitude (give or take several days because of Earth's varying month lengths and because Mars' orbit is pretty elliptical, so some of its "months" last MUCH longer than others, but this is a first approximation):
Ls 0 - March 20
Ls 10 - April 1
Ls 40 - May 1
Ls 70 - June 1
Ls 100 - July 1
Ls 130 - August 1
Ls 160 - September 1
Ls 190 - October 1
Ls 220 - November 1
Ls 250 - December 1
Ls 280 - January 1
Ls 310 - February 1
Ls 340 - March 1

Mars24 tells me it's currently Ls 148.5, so it's now equivalent to somewhere in the neighborhood of the third week of August. Back to school!

I've got a page on the Martian calendar here that tells you more about how the lengths of the seasons vary because of the elliptical orbit.

--Emily


--------------------
My blog - @elakdawalla on Twitter - Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Stu
post Oct 28 2008, 05:15 PM
Post #10


The Poet Dude
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 5551
Joined: 15-March 04
From: Kendal, Cumbria, UK
Member No.: 60



Couple of new colourisations at my online gallery, if anyone wants a look... As usual, not offered as scientififically accurate or useful, just sharing a couple of unashamedly pretty pictures. smile.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
01101001
post Oct 28 2008, 10:03 PM
Post #11


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 101
Joined: 29-January 06
Member No.: 667



The beginning of the end:

JPL Phoenix Mission News: NASA's Phoenix Mission Faces Survival Challenges

Goodbye, robotic arm! Thanks!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Oct 28 2008, 10:12 PM
Post #12


Solar System Cartographer
****

Group: Members
Posts: 7815
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Oh well - guess I was wrong in the other thread, it is the end for RA. I hope we get a pic of the arm's final location. Inquiring cartographers want to know!

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
TheChemist
post Oct 28 2008, 10:22 PM
Post #13


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 522
Joined: 24-November 04
From: Heraklion, GR.
Member No.: 112



Despite the repeated warnings, it still feels sad to see Phoenix fade away :-(
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mars loon
post Oct 28 2008, 11:59 PM
Post #14


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 548
Joined: 19-March 05
From: Princeton, NJ, USA
Member No.: 212



very sad to see fading away

like we are losing a close family member

lets enjoy our remaining time together and remember the great times we shared

ken
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
tedstryk
post Oct 29 2008, 01:33 AM
Post #15


Interplanetary Dumpster Diver
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 4392
Joined: 17-February 04
From: Powell, TN
Member No.: 33



Dang, I forgot about solar conjunction.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

6 Pages V   1 2 3 > » 
Closed TopicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 24th March 2019 - 03:21 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.