IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

14 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 5 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Winter campaign at Cook Haven, Sol 3512 - 3599 (December 13, 2013 - March 10, 2014)
SFJCody
post Jan 11 2014, 08:50 AM
Post #31


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 810
Joined: 8-February 04
From: Arabia Terra
Member No.: 12



QUOTE (walfy @ Jan 11 2014, 07:41 PM) *
This rock must have popped out pretty far from under the rover's weight. A new record!


Either that or it just fell out of the sky! biggrin.gif tongue.gif

Then again, it does have kind of an iron-y, nickel-y look to it... tongue.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
climber
post Jan 11 2014, 12:36 PM
Post #32


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2778
Joined: 14-February 06
From: Very close to the Pyrénées Mountains (France)
Member No.: 682



QUOTE (mhoward @ Jan 11 2014, 03:11 AM) *
So in other words, it probably appeared during the turn on Sol 3540. Neat, huh?

Any chance it was trapped in the weel and released during the turn?Doesn't tell more about the rock but just wondering about this possibility.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mhoward
post Jan 11 2014, 01:33 PM
Post #33


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 3428
Joined: 11-August 04
From: USA
Member No.: 98



I am guessing - just guessing - that our little friend might have come from here. (She drove over that spot on sol 3512.)

Color version:
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
 
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jvandriel
post Jan 11 2014, 04:19 PM
Post #34


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1848
Joined: 22-April 05
From: Ridderkerk, Netherlands
Member No.: 353



Here is the Mi cam panorama of that piece of rock from Sol 3541.

Jan van Driel

Attached Image
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Jan 11 2014, 05:53 PM
Post #35


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 7948
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



That's almost more confusing. An encrustation of gypsum, perhaps?


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
serpens
post Jan 12 2014, 03:09 AM
Post #36


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 642
Joined: 17-February 09
Member No.: 4605



It really is a tiny piece and freshly separated (dust free). When Opportunity next moves it will be interesting to see the area obscured by the left front wheel where I would suspect it originated. A clast separated from the matrix rather than a fractured rock?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dvandorn
post Jan 12 2014, 05:11 AM
Post #37


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3408
Joined: 9-February 04
From: Minneapolis, MN, USA
Member No.: 15



The pattern of the light-toned mineralization looks like it followed a set of cracks in the rock. Suggests aqueous intrusion to me.

What also catches my eye in this picture are the extremely fine lineations on some of the darker rounded rubble at the bottom of the image. Many of the tiny pebbles have very fine-grained scallops along the edges, others have hair-like, perfectly parallel grooves, some display aligned pits along their rounded surfaces. I'm guessing these are the remains of extremely thin strata, I guess I would find it harder to believe they're carved by eon-long persistent sand particle saltation.

-the other Doug


--------------------
“The trouble ain't that there is too many fools, but that the lightning ain't distributed right.” -Mark Twain
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
TheAnt
post Jan 13 2014, 02:16 PM
Post #38


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 474
Joined: 12-February 12
Member No.: 6336



My immediate thought were that it might be a small piece of 'fool's gold' (FeS2 compound) but now nprev said gypsum I had a second look and indeed there's a small piece below that might have fallen off and it do look white.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Zelenyikot
post Jan 14 2014, 08:46 PM
Post #39


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 208
Joined: 23-October 12
From: Russia
Member No.: 6725



I'm not sure, but it seems like a coal blink.gif
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
 


--------------------
My blog on Patreon
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
serpens
post Jan 14 2014, 09:53 PM
Post #40


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 642
Joined: 17-February 09
Member No.: 4605



Probably gypsum although there are other possibilities. An APXS will narrow the field and we will no doubt get the good word in due course. Regardless the deposition implies a fracture which would explain this bit apparently breaking off so easily. There are a couple of displaced fragments of rock evident in mhowards image at post #318, located at the edge of the rock around 205 degrees from Pinnacle Island (taking the top of the image as north) which would seem to define the trajectory.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
RoverDriver
post Jan 14 2014, 10:14 PM
Post #41


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 871
Joined: 29-September 06
From: Pasadena, CA - USA
Member No.: 1200



I'm not a geologist, but is it possible that could it be that it is this and Oppy dropped it?

Paolo


--------------------
Disclaimer: all opinions, ideas and information included here are my own,and should not be intended to represent opinion or policy of my employer.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Jan 14 2014, 10:37 PM
Post #42


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 7948
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



Good one, Paolo!!! laugh.gif (Long time no see, welcome back!)


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
marsophile
post Jan 16 2014, 08:49 PM
Post #43


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 355
Joined: 10-September 08
Member No.: 4338



Since there is no apparent trail leading to its current position, the rock must have flown through the air a fair distance. It seems difficult to explain how this could be triggered by the rover movement. Have we seen this kind of rover-induced rock mobility before?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Jan 16 2014, 09:01 PM
Post #44


Martian Cartographer
****

Group: Members
Posts: 7174
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



It's on rock. It wouldn't leave a trail.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
serpens
post Jan 16 2014, 09:35 PM
Post #45


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 642
Joined: 17-February 09
Member No.: 4605



Ref my post #333, there are a few displaced 'pebbles' that, on rock, would seem to represent a trail.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

14 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 5 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 28th June 2017 - 07:23 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.