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Phobos
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post Jul 29 2008, 04:37 AM
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QUOTE (Hungry4info @ Jul 28 2008, 09:35 PM) *
Oh yes, I'm certainly aware. ESA's public relations has always been a source of agitation for me.


You'll find lots of company here, then... rolleyes.gif


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A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
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Stu
post Jul 29 2008, 01:02 PM
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Just heard back from the ESA Media office...

"We are still waiting for the material, but expecting to receive the first images by the end of the day or tomorrow.

We will publish them on the web (link below) as soon as possible (tomorrow or Thursday the latest).

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/index.html"



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post Jul 29 2008, 07:55 PM
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unnecessary quoting removed

Thanks Stu,

I was beginning to wonder also. Does anyone know what the resolution of the images at closest approach will be, 1 metre per pixel, better, worse? Hopefully we'll get some more insight as to where Phobos camefrom.

Captured type D asteroid?

Formed around Mars?

Formed from impact ejecta from Mars?

My bet is still option 1, despite the difficulties with explaining orbital mechanics, but I still think, Phobos is as alien to Mars as the spacecraft we have sent.

It will be interesting to compare the new Phobos imagery with the NEAR / Shoemaker spacecraft imagery of similar resolution of asteroid 433 Eros.

Perhaps Mars Express could do similar with Deimos? Comparisons with the MARSIS & multispectral imagers / spectrometers of the two would be most fascinating.

Andrew Brown.


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"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before". Linda Morabito on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.
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CAP-Team
post Jul 29 2008, 09:53 PM
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Using spice kernels (for the spacecraft, Mars and Phobos) I tried to simulate the Mars Express Phobos flybies.
Underneath the images of how Phobos would approximately look like at closest approach.
The field of view in these images is 30 degrees (I don't know what field of view Mars Express has).

17 july 2008 (273 km)
Attached Image


23 july 2008 (97 km)
Attached Image


28 july 2008 (361)
Attached Image


I wonder how accurate Celestia will be wink.gif
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djellison
post Jul 29 2008, 11:49 PM
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width of the HRSC swath is about 12 degrees - covering 5000ish pixels.

Doug
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bear10829
post Jul 30 2008, 11:57 AM
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A photo of Phobos quoted to have been made during the 93 km flyby last week was published
in the Nature & Science section of todays Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, a major German newspaper.
G. Paul, who is frequently writing about space topics there, gave some general information about
the moon and a hint, that the photos cover the proposed Phobos-Grunt landing site.
This might be an indication that some release of data is near.

Best,
Oliver
Attached thumbnail(s)
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nprev
post Jul 30 2008, 12:06 PM
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If I read that correctly, the headline says "Over Mars: A Cosmic Potato Named Phobos"? Hilarious!!! laugh.gif


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Dominik
post Jul 30 2008, 12:41 PM
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Yes, the translation of the title is correct biggrin.gif.


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--- Under Construction ---
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lyford
post Jul 30 2008, 03:14 PM
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So can we nickname Phobos-Grunt "SPUDnik?" laugh.gif *ducks*


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Lyford Rome
"Zis is not nuts, zis is super-nuts!" Mathematician Richard Courant on viewing an Orion test
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post Jul 30 2008, 03:38 PM
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Link to DLR site of the Phobos Grunt landing site.

Images appearing now.

Andrew Brown.


--------------------
"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before". Linda Morabito on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.
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volcanopele
post Jul 30 2008, 04:00 PM
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Here is the link to the press release:

http://www.dlr.de/en/DesktopDefault.aspx/t.../86_read-13161/


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&@^^!% Jim! I'm a geologist, not a physicist!
The Gish Bar Times - A Blog all about Jupiter's Moon Io
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Hungry4info
post Jul 30 2008, 04:08 PM
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QUOTE (volcanopele @ Jul 30 2008, 11:00 AM) *



The image they provided there looks pretty distorted (The 3.74 Mb image). Do they intend to clean that up?


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elakdawalla
post Jul 30 2008, 04:45 PM
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I don't know about distortion -- Phobos looks pretty distorted in general; I can tell you from experience that it can be really hard to tell whether you have an oblique perspective or if an image has been unequally stretched. But I have a different question. There are two image releases that lack annotations. I thought that maybe they were the two views that had been combined to create the stereo image. But it appears that they are in fact the same image, stretched differently, and it seems that there was a gap in the image, some kind of data dropout, that was handled differently between the two images. In one the gap was closed, making an obvious seam; in the other, the gap was filled by duplicating pixels. I think that's what's going on anyway -- do others agree? The two pictures are
http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/marsex...os-Flyby_H1.jpg
and
http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/marsex...os-Flyby_H1.jpg
Odd.

--Emily


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elakdawalla
post Jul 30 2008, 04:53 PM
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The opposite of a usual activity: take apart an anaglyph to get its separate frames and voila, two more HRSC images of Phobos. Here's the red channel:
Attached Image

And the blue channel:
Attached Image

Enjoy! smile.gif

--Emily


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ilbasso
post Jul 30 2008, 05:08 PM
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Interesting, the relatively small number of the tiniest craters. The dust layer must be mighty thick.
Really cool anaglyph on the home page - it really leaps off the screen at you!


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Jonathan Ward
Manning the LCC at http://www.apollolaunchcontrol.com
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