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Trident, a NASA low cost mission to Triton
antipode
post Jun 20 2020, 03:01 AM
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Interesting, thanks Phil. Would be nice to have a dynamically 'hot' target, but beggars cant be choosers.

P
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Webscientist
post Dec 29 2020, 01:13 PM
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Here is a simulated view of Neptune from the surface of Triton. I produced it in 2020 for an article upon the Trident project in the journal of my astronomy club:

We will compare to reality in a few decades ! laugh.gif

(The apparent size of Neptune is well respected in the simulated view from my "smartphone": it would represent a disk whose apparent diameter is about 8 arc degrees or 15 times the apparent diameter of the Moon as seen from the Earth).

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JRehling
post Dec 30 2020, 05:13 PM
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That's a powerful image! Triton would be getting a lot of missions if it weren't for the travel time, and an image like that can do a lot to bring Triton forward in people's minds.

I'm not sure what color the skies are on Triton, but Neptune would contribute powerfully.
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Webscientist
post Dec 30 2020, 08:39 PM
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Thanks,
A way for me to explore in advance that mystical world that may turn out to be more exotic than expected in fact.
I often try to imagine the type of horizon we would get from the surface of Pluto or Triton since the atmosphere of Triton is so thin ( slightly denser than Pluto's atmosphere at "sea level").
I imagined a dull sky and a darker sky toward the zenith. Intuitive logic I would say!
For the appearance of the soil, it is quite speculative I would say because we only have one image of the surface of a planetary body of the outer solar system.

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titanicrivers
post Dec 31 2020, 06:44 PM
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Fascinating image Webscientist! The foreground is what I imagined the 'cantaloupe' Triton surface might appear close up. Agree with JRehling such images and others https://www.google.com/search?q=neptune+fro...50&biw=1536 would inspire more interest in outer solar system exploration.
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Webscientist
post Dec 31 2020, 09:37 PM
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QUOTE (titanicrivers @ Dec 31 2020, 07:44 PM) *
The foreground is what I imagined the 'cantaloupe' Triton surface might appear close up.


Thanks again,
For the cantaloupe, I used some "ingredients" not related to the cantaloupe terrain Voyager 2 had observed, without the purpose of producing those cantaloupe structures but the outcome reveals small scale-cantaloupes. Satisfied!
It also reminds me of the distorted surface the Phoenix lander had observed on Mars.
Let's hope we'll get higher resolution images of those cantaloupe terrains in the near future!
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