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Juno perijove 7: GRS images, July 11, 2017
Sean
post Jul 14 2017, 02:11 PM
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Thanks. I have updated the post & hope this is closer to the reality for now... apologies for the error.



I will update again once the sums are done.


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GS_Brazil
post Jul 14 2017, 02:14 PM
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QUOTE (Sean @ Jul 13 2017, 11:42 PM) *
PJ07_62_detail


I'm under the impression that I've seen this brownish / reddish cigar storm feature before in PJ06.
Are you guys somehow tracking how certain features evolve over time?
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jccwrt
post Jul 14 2017, 02:34 PM
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This is a different example of a relatively common atmospheric feature called a "barge". The barge from PJ06 was located near the northern boundary of the South Temperate Belt, which is the light/dark boundary at the top of Sean's picture. This one is at the southern boundary of the South Temperate Belt.
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mcaplinger
post Jul 14 2017, 04:17 PM
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QUOTE (Sean @ Jul 14 2017, 06:11 AM) *
I will update again once the sums are done.

In PJ7-0060 the east-west limb-to-limb view centered on the GRS covers about 10 degrees of longitude and the north-south extent of the GRS is about 10 degrees of latitude. See attached grid image (I apologize for this ugly figure, I don't have any good tools to make publication-quality grids.)

The scale on Jupiter is pi*2*70000/360 = 1222 km/degree roughly (using 70000 for the radius and ignoring oblateness). Longitudes have to be multiplied by cos(lat) but that's not a big effect at the latitude of the GRS (cos(22) is 0.93).

So in this image, the GRS is about 12000 km in vertical extent. That's just about the diameter of the Earth, so your revised image looks about right.

Note that the GRS has been shrinking over time, so there are all kinds of estimates for how big it is on the Web, and I wouldn't trust most of them. See http://www.lpi.usra.edu/opag/july2014/pres...-Simon_OPAG.pdf but that's from 2014.

Attached Image


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Sean
post Jul 14 2017, 04:59 PM
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Awesome! Thanks for the reply.


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mcaplinger
post Jul 14 2017, 05:12 PM
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Maybe I'm having some web cache problem, but the image still looks wrong upstream in post #59 (for a while the link was dead, it's now come back with the original incorrect version.)


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Sean
post Jul 14 2017, 05:39 PM
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I wanted to preserve the error to keep discussion relevant. My update edit was worded poorly.

Here is GRS eating Earth...


Using correct scale & PJ07_062




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Gerald
post Jul 14 2017, 06:21 PM
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This one has the potential to go viral.
I thought, that the effect and ambiguity of perspective should be removed somehow. Even before I found time to suggest something like this, you found a super-intuitive solution!
I hope, there won't be too many people who will believe, that this scenario might be real.
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PFK
post Jul 14 2017, 06:44 PM
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Amazing stuff on here (as usual!). The contrast between the undulating reds of the spot and the blue and white flows below it....it's almost enough to make you scream wink.gif
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Sean
post Jul 14 2017, 07:17 PM
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That's why I used a tabloid style satirical headline. I hope it is understood as a fun infographic.


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jccwrt
post Jul 14 2017, 09:14 PM
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Image #56, taken near the southern edge of the North Equatorial Belt. There's a very clear cyclonic feature here, which appear to be closely associated with some ripples on its western side. I wonder if the ripples are due to a velocity change in the atmospheric flow as it passes around the cyclone.

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Ant103
post Jul 15 2017, 11:14 AM
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What I could do with your imagery Gerald smile.gif



But I particulary like what I've done with this one, taken during the closest point to Jupiter I think (#57 ?) :


(I did a blog article about it : http://www.db-prods.net/blog/2017/07/15/su...piter-par-juno/ )


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Sean
post Jul 15 2017, 02:33 PM
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The lens effect is a great idea Damia...so effective. It's is one of my favourites!

Here is another crack at Gerald's PJ07_053_v2...


Detail from v3




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Gerald
post Jul 15 2017, 07:37 PM
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Damia, your artistic skills are one order of magnitude beyond mine, at least! Really fascinating.
---
In the meanwhile, I've rendered a 43.2 seconds GRS fly-over animation. It is 25-fold time-lapsed, covering 18 real-time minutes with 25 fps, i.e. one still per second, format is 1920x1080, i.e. full HD. I guess, that I'll spend most of the week-end to get it online, somehow.
At some point tonight, I'll prepare a website with the zipped stills, which will be updated incrementally, as new portions will be uploaded. Still sequences will overlap in order to allow blending in a reasonably wide range of times.
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Sean
post Jul 15 2017, 08:03 PM
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That is great news Gerald...can't wait to get my mitts on it. Do you have a rough estimate when all frames will be uploaded?

In the meantime I had another go at PJ07_62_detail [upscaled]


There is so much going on in there...quite hypnotic.


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