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The North American Solar Eclipse, Aug. 21, 2017
The Singing Badg...
post Mar 28 2017, 04:03 AM
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Flying out to Nashville! Probably a lousy choice weather-wise, but at least there should be a fun atmosphere in Music City.
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algorimancer
post Mar 28 2017, 05:40 PM
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My wife & I are flying to Kansas City the night before, plan to stay in a hotel about 15 minutes south of the line of totality, then drive to the line for the show. Aiming for a really small town to avoid the crowds.
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Explorer1
post Mar 28 2017, 06:18 PM
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Regulus, Jupiter, and all the (other) inner planets will be quite visible: http://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentials/a...ts-bright-stars

For my part, I have a possible conflict, and if worst comes to worst I'll miss the best of it up here in Canada. Perhaps the 2024 one is another opportunity...
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stevesliva
post Yesterday, 01:34 PM
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Everyone make out well?

Totality goes over my house in 2024.... wink.gif

Which is to say, I moved out of the PNW too soon, but let's hope for high pressure in April 2024.
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Explorer1
post Yesterday, 02:12 PM
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It was still a pretty impressive partial from Niagara Falls, and of course there will be a ringside seat in 2024 for me too.
Meanwhile, EPIC got some great views too: https://epic.gsfc.nasa.gov/
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tasp
post Yesterday, 04:09 PM
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Viewed eclipse from ~20 miles SE of Broken Bow NE. 5 hour drive to get there was somewhat grueling.
I had planned route to get there to take predominately E-W roads instead of N-S thinking less traffic.

LOL, Nebraska is a big state, takes quite a bit of traffic to fill up their roads.

Left early, saw lightning behind and in front of me for first hour. As day passed and I traveled west, sky conditions steadily improved.

Arrived on site ~ 2 hours before first contact, which was a relief, although route I took to get there was deliberately
set so last 2 hours of trip was in totality area, JIC. Benefit of site was I had actual permission of landowner to be there.
Did not see too many eclipse chasers till I stopped in Loup City for leg stretch and to purchase a few items I forgot to bring
(mayo!). Pumps weren't too busy so fueled vehicle too. By mileage readout on vehicle, at that point had enough fuel to reach site and
get back home without having to stop again, JIC.

Site was an actual farm, dogs and chickens and sheep and cattle and quite a bit more. Fun, interesting place to stop.
Nice picnic table and shade tree to park under, and plenty of open yard to watch from. Also was informed by the farmer with
all the ducks and chickens and the rest of the fowl, very few bugs, and he was right.

Despite the lengthy wait for first contact, was glad to have allowed so much padding on schedule, JIC.

At first contact, we broke for lunch. My prior eclipse (2/26/1979) taught me first 2/3 of obscuration was like watching paint dry
(no offense, eclipse Gods) and I did check every 5 minutes. Lunch was nice out doors, farm cats were not too insistent about
getting a treat, and the other critters 'at liberty' (guineas, peahens, ducks, dogs, and some kind of decorative goat creature) left us alone.

The 'civilians' on the site marveled at the view through the eclipse goggles (I brought several extra pairs) as the moon covered a
substantial fraction of the sun and yet looking around the farm would not have tipped you off that anything unusual was going on.

I estimate around 80% coverage the contrast of our shadows on the ground started to pale away, and the farm wife noted the colors
'were off' on her flowers and buildings and car.

From 80% onward we all watched continuously and intently, the view of the sun becoming more and more compelling.

It was amazing though, even with the sun down to just the barest crescent, the sky was still blue and it was hardly darker to the west than it
was to the east.

Despite watching intently, I hardly noticed Bailey's Beads at all, the view seeming to go from the barest sliver of a crescent to Diamond Ring almost instantly.

And then it was TOTAL !!

Glasses came off and the grownups were quiet (one kid chattered annoyingly and off topic during the ENTIRE eclipse) and they marveled at the
surreal and alien appearance of their familiar sun.

The 'pointy' nature of the outermost corona elicited comments such as 'what's that', what is causing that' etc, and then we saw a few stars and planets
and that brought out a few comments too.

In the early stage of totality, I was looking for red/orange prominences but didn't see anything worth pointing out till the last 1/3 and then the trailing
edge steadily developed the color over a wider arc and everyone noticed it.

And then ZAP, Diamond Ring and I hollered "GLASSES!" and the main event was over.

Many comments about how from the latter stages of the obscuration how the heat had gone out of the sunlight despite it still looking bright
outside. Well, our eyes compensate for variable illumination, but the feel of warmth on your face from being full on to the sun is not compensated
for by our skin.

Right after the end of totality we noted the goats in the pen were all laying down, and the farm cats were all curled up on the driveway too. Didn't
notice much change from the fowl noises, there being squawks and calls during the entire event regardless. Maybe too many different kinds of
birds on site?

The yard light came on, and also a set of Christmas lights on a gazeebo structure they had.

Didn't watch too much of the latter part of the eclipse. We picked up all our stuff and headed home, taking care to execute a reciprocal course,
being amazed at the lack of traffic we encountered on the way there, and hoping for the same on the way back.

There was more traffic on the way back, but nothing enough to be an issue except at one rural intersection where left turns onto a busy
road were backing up traffic maybe 30-40 vehicles. We were thru in 5 minutes, and that was the only traffic issue all day.

Stopped for ice cream, toilet and clot walk in Columbus NE and then pressed for home, getting back well before dark.

Furthest license plate we noted was only Wisconsin, and not sure what to make of nearly all the others being Nebraska with a few South Dakotas mixed in.

Also, I have maligned Nebraska in the past for one of the dullest car rides I have suffered on Interstate 80 there. Fortunately yesterday we traversed far more
interesting terrain; hills, cows, trees, creeks and irrigators. Also, irrigation canals, had no idea such works existed in such quantity.

Had a great time, excellent experience, and still despite all the fun, glad to be home after a successful trip.
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JohnVV
post Yesterday, 11:15 PM
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here in the Metro Detroit Area it was partly rain cloudy , no rain
cnn and my sim were as good

a short youtube vid

https://youtu.be/yjxgMycfKnU

a few screenshots

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Tom Dahl
post Today, 02:30 AM
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My wife and I live in Massachusetts, and had been planning an Eclipse vacation to the western US for many months (should I say Moons). We settled on central Oregon, near the tiny town of Ashwood. We were on the site of a ranch and agate mining claim, happily paying the owners for the privilege of being completely safe and comfy on their property. We had been staying in Gresham OR (which is a few miles east of Portland) 152 miles away from that site, which was the closest reasonable lodging I could find 8 months ago. We left Gresham at 4:30 AM and reached the site a little before 7:00AM (totality was to occur at about 10:22 AM local time). During the drive we watched Venus and the constellation of Orion climb into the sky before sunrise. We passed many little pull-outs and larger parking lots along the road overflowing with cars and eclipse watchers, and a large rest area that was full of cars; a few US Army or National Guard troops were standing around the by-then blocked-off entrance along with Highway department staff.

While waiting at our site for first contact we explored the area and the small mining claim. There were a couple of dozen other cars scattered over a few acres of the property. Then we settled down to watch the sky show. The forecast was for clear sky, though thin high clouds crept overhead; thankfully these did not turn out to be any problem. It gradually grew cooler and cooler, despite the expected daily high of 90F. It also grew dimmer and dimmer very gradually. By the time totality neared, only a couple of minutes away, the air was very cool and I felt quite chilly in short pants and a short-sleeve shirt. During the final minute or so before totality the ground and surrounding countryside was visibly getting dimmer. Freaky feeling! About 30 seconds before the start of totality I could see Venus high overhead.

Then - totality. This was the first viewing of such a spectacle for me. Amazing, incredible, stunning! I've been interested in Astronomy since I was an adolescent 45 years ago, and have seen scads of photos of the fully-eclipsed Sun. But there it was! Photographs do not do it justice. We were seeing it live, up in the sky in front of us all. It was bigger that I was somehow expecting it to look with the naked eye, and the corona was definitely brighter that I expected. Just beautiful, a ring of wispy white plasma surrounding a black perfect circle. I took a few hand-held photos, having decided months ago not to fuss very much over photography (even though I'm also a keen amateur photographer). To my eye the corona looked close to the third of my photos, the one with the longest exposure. Venus was brilliant overhead. I did not think to look for Orion, though the thin cloud might have obscured it in any case. The upper edge of the Sun had bits of red - a few prominences - visible with the naked eye.

The approximately two minutes of totality went by very fast, and then the brilliant sparkle of the third-contact diamond ring flashed out, with the remaining corona still visible. A second or two later the tiny sliver of the crescent Sun was once again blinding. Here are three cropped photographs taken with a 200mm telephoto lens (on a Nikon D300 APC-format digital camera), along with a wide-angle shot that gives a good impression of what it looked like in person.
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