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InSight Surface Operations, 26 Nov 2018-
PaulH51
post Aug 9 2021, 11:02 PM
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Looks like InSight's cameras may have witnessed a dust lifting event between Sols 943 & 946
Here's an ICC GIF using ICC frames from those 2 sols.
Look beyond the WTS for a bright streak across the ground, it's a little difficult to see in these unprocessed images, but I'm sure the image wizards here can increase the difference etc.
Fingers crossed that a gust of wind removed some of the dust on the lander's solar arrays smile.gif
Attached Image

A processed GIF was posted on Twitter link in also contains links to the raw frames. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/J.Roger.
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Explorer1
post Aug 10 2021, 02:35 AM
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An image of the solar arrays would settle the matter (but need power to move the arm, of course).
Almost 1 month after aphelion...fingers crossed that the worst is over.....
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Phil Stooke
post Aug 10 2021, 07:45 AM
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In this image I merged 946 with a negative of 943, cranked up the contrast and merged the result with the original 943 to how where things are. The affected surface darkens as bright dust is stripped away. There have been other such events, including one streak in almost exactly the same place between sols 253 and 261 (Figure 10 in this paper:

Charalambous, C., McClean, J., Baker, M., Pike, T., Golombek, M., Lemmon, M.T., Ansan, V., Perrin, C., Spiga, A., Lorenz, R.D. and Banks, M., 2021. Vortex-dominated aeolian activity at InSight's landing site, Part 1: Multi-instrument observations, analysis, and implications. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-PLANETS, 126(6), p.e2020JE006757.)


BUT - this streak is much easier to see in the difference images.

Phil


Attached Image



--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
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PDP8E
post Aug 11 2021, 03:14 AM
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Hey Paul, Phil,
a quickie try to get that streak more visible
spots of dust on the lens are coming off too...
GIF -- two frames
Attached Image



--------------------
CLA CLL
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PaulH51
post Aug 11 2021, 04:02 AM
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QUOTE (PDP8E @ Aug 11 2021, 11:14 AM) *
Hey Paul, Phil,
a quickie try to get that streak more visible
spots of dust on the lens are coming off too...

That's great news, the lens on the ICC camera is a lot closer to the solar arrays compared to the other side of the WTS smile.gif
Fingers and toes crossed for a few more watt/hours from a small cleaning event smile.gif

Thankyou... dd.gif dd.gif
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stevesliva
post Aug 11 2021, 03:02 PM
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Would be capriciously fitting if the weather station wasn't recording, but hopefully the watthours tell the tale.
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rlorenz
post Sep 10 2021, 11:16 PM
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It doesnt cover the recent sand-sprinkling cleaning efforts on InSight, but I have a paper just out (open access) that reviews the dust accumulation and removal on solar arrays on Mars landers/rovers (and Curiosity's UV sensors)

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pss.2021.105337
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Brian Swift
post Sep 11 2021, 02:38 AM
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QUOTE (rlorenz @ Sep 10 2021, 03:16 PM) *
It doesnt cover the recent sand-sprinkling cleaning efforts on InSight, but I have a paper just out (open access) that reviews the dust accumulation and removal on solar arrays on Mars landers/rovers (and Curiosity's UV sensors)

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pss.2021.105337

Thanks for sharing. Have studies been done of the feasibility of including a scale on a lander to weigh dust accumulation?

Unrelated to dust accumulation, do you have any good references for estimates of Mars' daylight spectral power distribution?

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rlorenz
post Sep 11 2021, 11:27 PM
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QUOTE (Brian Swift @ Sep 10 2021, 09:38 PM) *
Unrelated to dust accumulation, do you have any good references for estimates of Mars' daylight spectral power distribution?


The Crisp paper cited in my article is one.
you could also look at https://trs.jpl.nasa.gov/bitstream/handle/2....pdf?sequence=1
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Phil Stooke
post Sep 12 2021, 12:23 AM
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As for a scale on the lander to weigh dust accumulation... it would be like the time I took my car to the recycling place to drop off some styrofoam packaging. They weighed the car, I dropped off a few chunks of styrofoam and they weighed the car again. Not a lot of difference!

Phil


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Brian Swift
post Sep 12 2021, 04:22 AM
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QUOTE (rlorenz @ Sep 11 2021, 03:27 PM) *
The Crisp paper cited in my article is one.
you could also look at https://trs.jpl.nasa.gov/bitstream/handle/2....pdf?sequence=1

Thanks for the response. I'll see if I can find a non-paywalled version of the Crisp paper.
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Fox
post Sep 18 2021, 06:35 PM
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1000 sols!
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Tom Tamlyn
post Sep 22 2021, 05:31 PM
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QUOTE
NASA’s InSight Finds Three Big Marsquakes, Thanks to Solar-Panel Dusting
The lander cleared enough dust from one solar panel to keep its seismometer on through the summer, allowing scientists to study the three biggest quakes they’ve seen on Mars.
On Sept. 18, NASA’s InSight lander celebrated its 1,000th Martian day, or sol, by measuring one of the biggest, longest-lasting marsquakes the mission has ever detected. The temblor is estimated to be about a magnitude 4.2 and shook for nearly an hour-and-a-half.

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/nasas-insight...r-panel-dusting
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