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Unmanned Spaceflight.com _ Sun _ SDO

Posted by: PhilCo126 Feb 4 2010, 11:02 AM

So it's fingers crossed for the Solar Dynamics Observatory, destined to help the predictions of "space weather".
SDO promises to become an exciting mission as an orbiting solar observatory with multiple high-definition telescopes has never been attempted before… cool.gif

The prelaunch readiness press conference will be held at 1 p.m. EST, on Monday, 8th February 2010 from the Kennedy Space Center News Center. It will be immediately followed by the SDO science briefing, both briefings will be
broadcast live on NASA Television. Launch is set for 9th February 2010 (10:30 – 11:30 a.m. EST).

Posted by: Sunspot Feb 4 2010, 02:10 PM

Unfortunately we wont have realtime images like we have with SOHO

Posted by: djellison Feb 4 2010, 02:17 PM

At 130Mbps - we'd struggle to keep up, and to establish and maintain an internet server platform to host that content would be an epic, and expensive challenge.

Posted by: helvick Feb 4 2010, 04:41 PM

That's a couple of Petabyte's per annum once you factor in the need to keep the raw data and have the space for a couple of derived products for each image. Even if they decide to release jpg's in a manner similar to the MER releases we won't be having a Midnight Sol Browser downloading all of those to our PC's anytime soon. smile.gif

Posted by: Sunspot Feb 4 2010, 05:36 PM

One per hour would be ok

Posted by: Ron Hobbs Feb 10 2010, 01:02 AM

nprev,

I think you are going to love SDO as well. I watched the pre-launch science briefing this morning, and it is a damn powerful observatory. And of course we will still be getting data from STEREO.

I think we are going to learn a lot about our nearest star.

Ron

Posted by: Explorer1 Feb 15 2010, 01:22 AM

So when does the mission officially begin? They've launched successfully, and have to maneuver into a better orbit, but how long until the firehose opens up? I hope they follow the HiRise team's lead....

Posted by: Sunspot Feb 15 2010, 07:58 AM

April I think

Posted by: Ron Hobbs Feb 15 2010, 04:37 PM

Hmmm. The SDO Mission website is down. I hope that is not a bad sign. They will probably get it back online after the holiday here.

Pertinent to this thread, one of the people on the Scientific Briefing last week commented that they were hoping to get SDO in orbit at solar minimum so they could follow an entire solar cycle. They were quite delighted that the Sun had "cooperated" by delaying its exit from minimum.

BTW, the briefing materials are http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sdo/news/briefing-materials-20100209.html. There are some pretty cool graphics there.

Posted by: Sunspot Feb 15 2010, 08:16 PM

QUOTE (Ron Hobbs @ Feb 15 2010, 04:37 PM) *
Hmmm. The SDO Mission website is down. I hope that is not a bad sign.


It's been off for a few days now.

Posted by: Explorer1 Feb 16 2010, 03:52 AM

"It will take about 3 weeks to circularize SDO's orbit and another month to test the spacecraft and check out the science instruments. We will see first light in about 60 days"

From a new blog post on TPS. Doing well so far....

Posted by: Ron Hobbs Feb 16 2010, 05:19 PM

The http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002346/ blog was written by fellow Solar System Ambassador Ken Kremer and is certainly worth a read.

SDO is being described as "the crown jewel" of Solar observatory missions. As part of their outreach, National Air and Space Museum (and another museum whose name I don't remember) will have big flat screens showing the near real time images of the Sun. (1.5 terabytes/day will be coming down to the ground.)

You know, I think we are going to need an SDO thread.

Posted by: PhilCo126 Feb 20 2010, 11:08 AM

SDO website s back online with news that on February 17, 2010 the observatory completed the first of 9 main engine burns that will raise the spacecraft from 2500 Km into its final geosynchronous orbit at 36000 Km...

Posted by: Sunspot Mar 17 2010, 08:05 AM

SDO is on Station

Tue, 16 Mar

The third Trim Motor Firing (TMF #3) was successfully completed Tuesday evening. This apogee burn raised our perigee to geosynchronous with an orbital period of one day.

SDO is on station, next is to start up the instruments!

Posted by: kwan3217 Mar 17 2010, 09:46 PM

For part the way up, one channel of the EVE instrument was on. All the doors and filters were closed, though which means that its measurement was uncorrupted by light.

Every time the spacecraft went through perigee, the signal on that channel spiked by a factor of 10. The first perigee was less than 1 hour after we turned the EVE electronics on. It was kind of scary watching it the first time, wondering if it would ever turn around. We recognized almost immediately that we were seeing the protons of the inner Van Allen belt. Our instrument is relatively well shielded against the electrons of the outer belt, but we could (just barely) see that belt also.

Now EVE is an ultraviolet instrument, not a radiation instrument, and is not calibrated to do an actual radiation measurement. We can't say that a particular measurement represents so many particle hits per second, particle energy, particle type, or really anything other than we got higher counts here than there. But it does make an interesting map.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vA4Y4kSzGNE

Posted by: stevesliva Mar 17 2010, 09:58 PM

Neat! Someone help me on the music... something by Bizet?

Posted by: kwan3217 Mar 17 2010, 10:49 PM

Beethoven's Ninth, second movement (Molto Vivace)

Posted by: Byran Mar 21 2010, 10:28 AM

http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IAUS..264..434S

QUOTE
STRESS - STEREO TRansiting Exoplanet and Stellar Survey
The Heliospheric Imager (HI) instruments on board the two STEREO (Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory) spacecraft provides an excellent opportunity for space based stellar photometry. The HI instruments provide a wide area coverage (20° × 20° for the two HI-1 instruments and 70° × 70° for the two HI-2 instruments) and long continuous periods of observations (20 days and 70 days respectively). Using HI-1A which has a pass band of 6500Å to 7500Å and a cadence of 40 minutes, we have gathered photometric information for more than a million stars brighter than 12th magnitude for a period of two years. Here we present some early results from this study on a range of variable stars and the future prospects for the data.


Plan to use images of the solar observatory SDO (Solar Dynamics Observatory) too to search for transit exoplanets?

Posted by: djellison Mar 21 2010, 11:47 AM

SDO isn't taking the same sort of imagery as the instruments mentioned in that article.

Posted by: Explorer1 Mar 22 2010, 11:51 PM

http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/mission/project/leostatus.php

They've reached science orbit and are testing instruments now. Encouraging to see that they're posting on weekends...

Posted by: Sunspot Mar 23 2010, 02:13 PM

First light is expected very soon

Posted by: stevesliva Mar 24 2010, 05:33 PM

HMI door open. Sweet.

Posted by: kwan3217 Mar 26 2010, 10:26 PM

EVE instrument: All four doors open, all channels are functioning properly

Posted by: djellison Mar 27 2010, 02:50 PM

Heard at the UK Space Conference, a STEREO scientists wouldn't comment directly about SDO when asked if he had seen pictures yet - but he said "I'm smiling"



Posted by: Sunspot Mar 27 2010, 04:45 PM

I think they are opening the doors to the AIA instrument today.

Posted by: Sunspot Mar 27 2010, 06:52 PM

All 4 doors on the AIA instrument successfully opened a few hours ago.

Posted by: kwan3217 Apr 2 2010, 01:55 PM

First Light press conference tentatively scheduled for 21 April 2010

Posted by: Sunspot Apr 5 2010, 04:44 PM

QUOTE (kwan3217 @ Apr 2 2010, 02:55 PM) *
First Light press conference tentatively scheduled for 21 April 2010


Confirmed now.

Posted by: Stu Apr 5 2010, 05:08 PM

From SDO's Twitter updates:

"First Light press conference scheduled for April 21st! Calibration tests so far are amazing. Updates here: http://ow.ly/1uKgs "

Not building these images up at all, are they? laugh.gif

Posted by: Sunspot Apr 13 2010, 02:06 PM

Massive solar prominence

http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov//data/REPROCESSING/Completed/2010/eit304/20100413/20100413_0719_eit304_1024.jpg

PLEASE PLEASE let SDO have captured that !!!!!!!

LASCO C2

http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov//data/REPROCESSING/Completed/2010/c2/20100413/20100413_1331_c2_1024.jpg

Posted by: Sunspot Apr 13 2010, 04:15 PM

Visible in the C3 images now

http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov//data/REPROCESSING/Completed/2010/c3/20100413/20100413_1342_c3_1024.jpg

Unfortunatey, it looks like SOHO missed most of the event.

Posted by: elakdawalla Apr 13 2010, 04:30 PM

I wasn't sure what I was going to write about today; that'll do nicely! Thanks for keeping an eye on the Sun for the rest of us, Sunspot! I would love to see SDO images of this; I don't yet have a good sense for what SDO will be showing us.

Posted by: Sunspot Apr 13 2010, 04:59 PM

Im soooo hoping SDO caught this... can you imagine it not in a 1024x1024 pixel image like SOHO but one at 4096x4096 and images every 10 seconds

Made a animated GIF from the C2 images

 

Posted by: Sunspot Apr 13 2010, 05:43 PM

And from C3

 

Posted by: kwan3217 Apr 13 2010, 08:44 PM

SDO started a calibration maneuver at 8:00UTC during this event, in which it turned away from the Sun. During the maneuver it would have briefly glanced at the Sun again. This was after the EIT image mentioned above, but before the coronagraph images. I can't say anything about whether AIA was taking pictures before 8:00, just what the spacecraft as a whole was doing. If they were taking pictures before this maneuver or during the part where the spacecraft glanced back, they should have something (additional) awesome to show at the first light press conference.

Posted by: Sunspot Apr 13 2010, 10:03 PM

QUOTE (kwan3217 @ Apr 13 2010, 09:44 PM) *
SDO started a calibration maneuver at 8:00UTC during this event, in which it turned away from the Sun.


ohh never mind.

 

Posted by: djellison Apr 13 2010, 10:39 PM

It's not like this is the last flare expected to occur during SDO's lifetime. There will be dozens, hundreds, thousands over the next decade.

Posted by: NickF Apr 13 2010, 10:47 PM

Direct link for the LASCO C2 movie of the recent mass ejection

http://soho.esac.esa.int/data/LATEST/current_c2.mpg

(interesting to see something apparently flying splat into the Sun on 10 Apr - I assume this has been discussed elsewhere)

Posted by: stevesliva Apr 13 2010, 11:27 PM

QUOTE (NickF @ Apr 13 2010, 06:47 PM) *
http://soho.esac.esa.int/data/LATEST/current_c2.mpg


Word is the SDO press conference on the 21st will have video of at least one prominence, but it's not necessarily either seen here. As Doug said, there will be lots to see over the years.

Posted by: centsworth_II Apr 14 2010, 01:00 AM

QUOTE (NickF @ Apr 13 2010, 05:47 PM) *
(interesting to see something apparently flying splat into the Sun on 10 Apr - I assume this has been discussed elsewhere)

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/comet-eaten-by-the-sun-100411.html

Not so rare an event it seems. From 2006: http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/061106_comet_sun.html

Posted by: nprev Apr 14 2010, 01:12 AM

No, not at all. IIRC, SOHO's picked up more than 1700 Sun-grazing comets, many of which actually impacted the Sun.

Relatively bright ones like this are uncommon, though, and definitely very cool! smile.gif

Posted by: Stu Apr 14 2010, 05:25 AM

All this activity is really making me want to buy a solar telescope... Had a look through a few, and seeing prominences in an eyepiece is absolutely amazing. I think that once SDO starts releasing images, and video, of the Sun "in action" demand for solar telescopes is going to go through the roof...

I feel some overtime coming on...

Posted by: Sunspot Apr 14 2010, 06:51 AM

QUOTE (djellison @ Apr 13 2010, 11:39 PM) *
It's not like this is the last flare expected to occur during SDO's lifetime. There will be dozens, hundreds, thousands over the next decade.


Yes, but the Sun has been blank and lifeless for about 700 days over the last few years, this is like Christmas coming.

Posted by: Ant103 Apr 14 2010, 09:57 AM

Some pics taken by french amateur here smile.gif
http://www.astrosurf.com/ubb/Forum3/HTML/025003.html
http://www.astrosurf.com/ubb/Forum3/HTML/025001.html
http://www.astrosurf.com/ubb/Forum3/HTML/024994.html
http://www.astrosurf.com/ubb/Forum3/HTML/024998.html
http://www.astrosurf.com/ubb/Forum3/HTML/024995.html

Pretty amazing smile.gif

Posted by: ElkGroveDan Apr 14 2010, 03:59 PM

QUOTE (Ant103 @ Apr 14 2010, 01:57 AM) *
Some pics taken by french amateur here smile.gif


Vache sacrée!

Posted by: Sunspot Apr 14 2010, 08:46 PM

Here's the eruption taken from the full size 1024x1024 C2 images

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2249/4521736464_c6674900b2_o.gif

It covers the time frame 09.54 - 16.06 UT

Posted by: Sunspot Apr 16 2010, 08:02 AM

Great view from STEREO Ahead !!!!!!!

http://stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov/browse//2010/04/13/ahead/euvi/304/2048/20100413_093615_n4euA_304.jpg

Posted by: Sunspot Apr 16 2010, 08:33 AM

18 hours from STEREO AHEAD

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4011/4524856427_01d6ff507b_o.gif

Same from STEREO Behind

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4005/4524857095_496ae77aec_o.gif

Posted by: Sunspot Apr 16 2010, 09:06 AM

And a half size, full frame animation - 4.5MB

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4027/4525525206_c3ea71a6e3_o.gif

Posted by: pjam Apr 18 2010, 02:55 AM

Thanks for posting these views..! Looking forward to lots more from SDO!
Cheers,
-pjam

Posted by: Tman Apr 21 2010, 02:00 PM

Have you taken a seat already? http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/

Posted by: stevesliva Apr 21 2010, 04:35 PM

An extra link from a friend:

http://aia.lmsal.com/public/firstlight.html
http://aia.lmsal.com/public/firstlight/

I have reason to believe there will be some incredible videos posted there.

Posted by: Stu Apr 21 2010, 05:50 PM

The SDO Outreach team really seem to have a handle on it, don't they? I think this will be a brilliant and very rewarding mission to follow - and that sales of solar viewing telescopes will rocket after tonight.

Posted by: djellison Apr 21 2010, 05:52 PM

Or people might go ( like I did a while ago ) "Meh - not much point looking through a telescope with pics like this available" biggrin.gif

Posted by: Stu Apr 21 2010, 05:57 PM

Yeah, but then they actually *look* through a telescope, and see the prominences leaping off the Sun with their own eyes, and the Sun becomes... alive... I'm hoping to get a solar telescope set up at our solar system scale model in August - and planning on some big summer overtime to afford to buy a Coronado for myself, too :-)

Posted by: Ron Hobbs Apr 21 2010, 06:14 PM

QUOTE (Tman @ Apr 21 2010, 07:00 AM) *
Have you taken a seat already?


I am in the front row.

Posted by: ugordan Apr 21 2010, 06:18 PM

Presser now starting on NASA TV.

Posted by: tedstryk Apr 21 2010, 06:37 PM

QUOTE (djellison @ Apr 21 2010, 05:52 PM) *
Or people might go ( like I did a while ago ) "Meh - not much point looking through a telescope with pics like this available" biggrin.gif


Either way, it should definitely help the hard drive industry.

Posted by: djellison Apr 21 2010, 06:45 PM

Umm.

WOW

smile.gif

Posted by: Ron Hobbs Apr 21 2010, 06:49 PM

As "Lika" said, "... struck with awe."

Posted by: stevesliva Apr 21 2010, 07:43 PM

QUOTE (stevesliva @ Apr 21 2010, 12:35 PM) *
An extra link from a friend:
http://aia.lmsal.com/public/firstlight.html

I haven't gotten the movs to download, but the stills are nice. Like this one:
http://aia.lmsal.com/public/firstlight/20100408_044515/f0171.gif

Posted by: Hungry4info Apr 21 2010, 08:55 PM

I only attempted to download one, but didn't have a problem.

If it weren't 40 Mb I would e-mail it to you.

Posted by: Ron Hobbs Apr 21 2010, 09:18 PM

I was poking around the SDO First Light web page and I found this site. Has the movies in numerous formats and sizes.

http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/Gallery/SDOFirstLight.html#DirectLinkstoAIAHigh-DefinitionMovies

I think I will spending some time there.

Posted by: stevesliva Apr 21 2010, 10:12 PM

Edited my previous links to the actual HTML page rather than a directory listing:
http://aia.lmsal.com/public/firstlight.html

Posted by: deglr6328 Apr 21 2010, 10:30 PM

OHH EM EFF GEE......

*dies*

ohmy.gif ohmy.gif ohmy.gif ohmy.gif

......no words.

Mindblowing.

Posted by: nprev Apr 21 2010, 10:52 PM

SDO might just be the mission that finally converts Mrs. nprev into an UMSF fan...just caught her independently surfing to this site on her MacBook! laugh.gif

Just stunning.

Posted by: Explorer1 Apr 21 2010, 11:34 PM

Like MRO/LRO all over again!

Quite a trio we've got going on eh?

Posted by: Stu Apr 22 2010, 05:20 AM

QUOTE (nprev @ Apr 21 2010, 11:52 PM) *
SDO might just be the mission that finally converts Mrs. nprev into an UMSF fan...just caught her independently surfing to this site on her MacBook! laugh.gif


That's it, she's come over to the Dark Side now...

You'll have to behave now, Nick! laugh.gif

Posted by: nprev Apr 22 2010, 05:37 AM

No worries. She married a sleazy cigar-smoking robot, she knows the score. wink.gif tongue.gif

Posted by: Sunspot Apr 22 2010, 06:50 AM

I wonder why they didnt go with the same colour scheme for the 304 (orange) ,171 (Blue) and 193 (Green) lines like those from SOHO and STEREO.

Posted by: Sunspot Apr 22 2010, 07:11 AM

Here's the SOHO EIT 171 image taken at about the same time as the SDO 171 IMAGE, the difference is staggering.

http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov//data/REPROCESSING/Completed/2010/eit171/20100408/20100408_0700_eit171_1024.jpg

http://aia.lmsal.com/public/firstlight/20100408_013015/f0171.gif

The SDO image is a 10MB GIF, couldn't find it in JPG format.



And again with the EIT 304 image

http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov//data/REPROCESSING/Completed/2010/eit304/20100408/20100408_0719_eit304_1024.jpg

http://aia.lmsal.com/public/firstlight/20100408_013015/f0304.gif

Again the SDO image is a 10MB GIF

Posted by: kwan3217 Apr 22 2010, 04:07 PM

On the press conference and EVE instrument:

The solar image on the EVE spectrum image is not a mistake. We designed the instrument almost from the beginning to use an otherwise unused portion of one of the spectrometer CCDs as a pinhole camera - we call it SAM, the Solar Aspect Monitor. SAM has its own hardware including a precision 26 micron pinhole, filter wheel, and its own optical path with a door (one of four on the instrument) that we had to open to get first light.

The unexpected thing about it is that we are able to see the sun as well as we do. The SAM image was apparent in the very first CCD image we got down. We weren't expecting to be able to see the limb or active regions this well until years from now, well up into solar max.

-- A concerned EVE data processing engineer

Posted by: Stu Apr 22 2010, 05:36 PM

V cool...

"SDO shows Earth eclipsing Sun":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TjlFL-3rLLE

Posted by: Explorer1 Apr 23 2010, 02:12 AM

Those comparison images really drive home the difference in resolving power.
The comparison between MRO taking on MGS's role is more and more apt!

Posted by: elakdawalla Apr 23 2010, 04:17 AM

QUOTE (kwan3217 @ Apr 22 2010, 08:07 AM) *
The solar image on the EVE spectrum image is not a mistake.

What exactly was said about that? It surprised me when I heard it but I was busy writing down other things so I didn't get what the P.I. said. It seemed weird to me that an image of the Sun showing up so beautifully on a detector would be a "mistake."

Posted by: Stu Apr 23 2010, 05:45 AM

Come on, you knew it was coming... smile.gif

http://astropoetry.wordpress.com/2010/04/23/sdo-opens-its-eyes

Posted by: kwan3217 Apr 23 2010, 09:38 PM

QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Apr 22 2010, 10:17 PM) *
What exactly was said about that? It surprised me when I heard it but I was busy writing down other things so I didn't get what the P.I. said. It seemed weird to me that an image of the Sun showing up so beautifully on a detector would be a "mistake."


From the report on Spaceflightnow.com: http://spaceflightnow.com/news/n1004/21sdoimages/
QUOTE
"Our first image from EVE doesn't look anything like it should," Pesnell said.


I may have misinterpreted this, but I remember thinking at the time that it sounded like he said this was a mistake.

Posted by: Hungry4info Apr 23 2010, 10:09 PM

Yeah, the way it was worded made me think it was a problem too.

Posted by: stevesliva Apr 24 2010, 12:00 AM

QUOTE (kwan3217 @ Apr 23 2010, 05:38 PM) *
I may have misinterpreted this, but I remember thinking at the time that it sounded like he said this was a mistake.


But, is it? Is there worry that at solar max the pinhole image will obscure the spectrum? (Or some such thing?)

It's "unexpected," but is it okay?

Posted by: kwan3217 Apr 24 2010, 04:09 AM

QUOTE (stevesliva @ Apr 23 2010, 06:00 PM) *
But, is it? Is there worry that at solar max the pinhole image will obscure the spectrum? (Or some such thing?)

It's "unexpected," but is it okay?


We don't expect the SAM image to cause a problem, even at solar max. There is plenty of space on the CCD between the solar image and the spectrum. If it does somehow cause a problem, we can turn the SAM filter wheel to 'dark' and effectively turn SAM off. SAM is a lower priority measurement -- EVE is primarily a spectrometer, and there are five other cameras on SDO, all higher-resolution than SAM.

SAM isn't even really an imager - we plan on using it to get a spectrum as well. The main EVE measurement is a spectrum from about 7nm, right on the edge between ultraviolet and x-rays, out to about 120nm, at the Lyman Alpha line. We use SAM to fill in the spectrum from 7nm down to almost zero, in the soft x-ray band.

It's really hard to build a diffraction grating that works for x-rays. The smaller the wavelength is, the smaller the lines on the grating have to be. It's hard enough to get a grating that works well in extreme ultraviolet. Also, x-rays being x-rays, they have a tendency to pass through the grating rather than be diffracted by it.

So, SAM doesn't use a grating at all. We collect the image of the sun, and then analyze that image pixel-by-pixel. SAM is designed with a small-enough pinhole and short-enough exposure that we expect only one x-ray photon to hit any one pixel. When a pixel does get hit, its brightness is directly proportional to the energy of the photon that hit it. Then we can use Planck's constant to get the wavelength of each photon, then count and bin the photons to get a spectrum.

It's a really neat concept, and one that hasn't to my knowledge been tried in space. The theory is good, but in theory, theory and practice are identical, while in practice, they are not. We are treating it as an engineering experiment. We have a long way to go before we see this work, but initial signs are good.

Posted by: dilo Apr 25 2010, 06:55 AM

Perhaps I missed the information within thread... do we have any indication of public, regular, real-time images release in the next future???

Posted by: Sunspot Apr 27 2010, 08:48 PM

SDO Day 76: Getting Ready for Science Data

Mon, 26 Apr

SDO is moving toward becoming an operational science mission. The data will be available from several sites in a variety of formats. SDO scientists and engineers are working to set up those access points, but we won't be ready for regular data releases until mid-May.

Next step is the EVE calibration rocket, scheduled to fly on May 3, 2010 from the White Sands Missile Range.

Posted by: stevesliva Apr 27 2010, 11:25 PM

More prominence vids:
http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/27apr10_plasmarain/

Posted by: jrdahlman Apr 28 2010, 03:21 AM

Now that we have "real-time" images of the sun, I've been wondering about the issue of light-time delay:

In these images, do the scientists need to take into account the light-time travel distance between different parts of the sun?

For most planets, even Jupiter, it doesn't make much of a difference. But the sun is several light-seconds wide. (Ah, "about 4.643" in diameter from a quick Wikipedia lookup.) The sun is a globe, so if dead center of the image is "now", the edge of the images would presumably show events that happened a few seconds "before" the center's events--in other words, no picture of the sun shows it all "at the same time"!

Would this effect distort the shape of prominences? (I mean really big ones.) Should we "correct" images for it? (Leave the center alone, but shove the part at the edge back closer to the sun so "the is the shape it really was at that moment"?)

Maybe we should mentally overlay an archers-target of concentric rings over sun images: label bulls-eye as "now", the next ring as "x sec. ago", etc.

Can we fix this? Merge pictures taken a few seconds apart: keep the center and merge the outer part from a few seconds before it... Oh darn. It only takes pictures every 10 seconds. Missed the window! But you know what I'm going for.

What is the way solar scientists handle this issue?




Posted by: Hungry4info Apr 28 2010, 03:40 AM

I would imagine that since not a lot of things occur in a 4-second duration on the sun, compared to what all is being observed, it's forgivable.

But I'm not a solar physicist so that's just my uneducated guess.

Posted by: nprev Apr 28 2010, 03:55 AM

The scale of observations should be considered. Phenomena of interest such as prominences, etc. are fairly localized, so the speed of light isn't really much of a factor. In any case, events that might effect the entire Sun (i.e., long-period 'seismic' oscillations) obviously propagate at far less than the speed of light, so again SOL lag isn't really a consideration for observation or interpretation.

Posted by: Sunspot Apr 28 2010, 06:47 AM

There are smaller version available on youtube if you don't fancy the 25MB version http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3C9L90uAOXs

Posted by: Oersted Apr 28 2010, 09:49 AM

ouch, a hair on the lens?!

Spectacular images! - I really look forward to a hi-def 1080p hour-long movie for my flat-screen tv!

Posted by: S_Walker Apr 29 2010, 06:58 PM

QUOTE (Oersted @ Apr 28 2010, 04:49 AM) *
ouch, a hair on the lens?


Looks like it's directly on the detector, or it was a CR hit on the flat field calibration frame.

Posted by: Adam Hurcewicz May 10 2010, 06:14 PM

Take a look to most recent images from:
http://sdowww.lmsal.com/suntoday


http://sdowww.lmsal.com/sdomedia/SunInTime/mostrecent/l0131.jpg
http://sdowww.lmsal.com/sdomedia/SunInTime/mostrecent/l0171.jpg
http://sdowww.lmsal.com/sdomedia/SunInTime/mostrecent/l0193.jpg
http://sdowww.lmsal.com/sdomedia/SunInTime/mostrecent/l0211.jpg
http://sdowww.lmsal.com/sdomedia/SunInTime/mostrecent/l0094.jpg
http://sdowww.lmsal.com/sdomedia/SunInTime/mostrecent/l0335.jpg
http://sdowww.lmsal.com/sdomedia/SunInTime/mostrecent/l1600.jpg
http://sdowww.lmsal.com/sdomedia/SunInTime/mostrecent/l1700.jpg
http://sdowww.lmsal.com/sdomedia/SunInTime/mostrecent/l4500.jpg
http://sdowww.lmsal.com/sdomedia/SunInTime/mostrecent/l0304.jpg

http://sdowww.lmsal.com/sdomedia/SunInTime/mostrecent/l_304_211_171.jpg
http://sdowww.lmsal.com/sdomedia/SunInTime/mostrecent/l_094_335_193.jpg
http://sdowww.lmsal.com/sdomedia/SunInTime/mostrecent/l_211_193_171.jpg

Change letter "l" to "f" or "t" is:
l - 1024x1024 px
f - 4096x4096 px
t - 512x512 px

More info:
http://sdowww.lmsal.com/js/whats_this.html

Posted by: Sunspot May 10 2010, 06:40 PM

blink.gif ohmy.gif

cool

Posted by: Stu May 10 2010, 08:49 PM

Oh man, like my hard drive wasn't groaning already... laugh.gif

Posted by: Stu May 11 2010, 07:08 PM

smile.gif smile.gif smile.gif

VERY chuffed - and honoured - to have my "First Light" poem featured on the SDO Website...

http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/mission/project/leostatus.php

smile.gif

Posted by: Tesheiner May 11 2010, 08:23 PM

Well done, Stu! smile.gif

Posted by: Sunspot May 22 2010, 07:42 PM

http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/

The SDO site now has access to images, although its listed as "the sun now" they are about 36 hours old.

Posted by: Sunspot May 24 2010, 04:06 PM

Some fantastic magnetic loops visible in the "193" images today

Posted by: Sunspot Jun 1 2010, 07:23 AM

The SDO images have been looking a little odd lately, not sure if its a processing issue before they go onto the web or what. Looking badly overexposed.

Posted by: Juramike Jun 1 2010, 01:34 PM

Maybe the sun is too bright? smile.gif
<ducks>

Posted by: Sunspot Jun 10 2010, 07:24 AM

Stunning prominence visible to SDO right now




 

Posted by: Stu Jun 10 2010, 02:50 PM

Gorgeous pic, thanks!

I was really tthinking about buying a solar telescope, but can't help wondering "What's the point, when I can enjoy the view via SDO?" But I'm one of those people who actually finds more enjoyment and satisfaction in seeing Jupiter's belts and moons for real, through my own 4.5" reflector, than I do from looking at a Hubble portrait, so I'll probably still get one... some day...

Posted by: S_Walker Jun 11 2010, 12:30 PM

I agree- there's nothing like the experience of seeing/imaging the Sun, Moon, or planets yourself compared to images produced by spacecraft. SDO is great, but the beauty of owning your own solar scope is you can watch changes occur on the Sun in real time. A good, small solar hydrogen-alpha scope is very affordable nowadays.
I use an old Coronado PST and a webcam to record prominences, filaments, and active regions on the Sun every day it's clear (and something interesting is visible). Here's a mosaic I took last week using this combination. BTW, the scope, camera, and tracking mount I use cost a total of just under $1000 US.


Posted by: Sunspot Jun 12 2010, 12:07 AM

Prominence from STEREO B

http://stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov/browse//2010/06/07/behind/euvi/304/2048/20100607_181615_n4euB_304.jpg

Posted by: jgoldader Jun 13 2010, 11:56 AM

QUOTE (S_Walker @ Jun 11 2010, 07:30 AM) *
I agree- there's nothing like the experience of seeing/imaging the Sun, Moon, or planets yourself compared to images produced by spacecraft. SDO is great, but the beauty of owning your own solar scope is you can watch changes occur on the Sun in real time. A good, small solar hydrogen-alpha scope is very affordable nowadays.
I use an old Coronado PST and a webcam to record prominences, filaments, and active regions on the Sun every day it's clear (and something interesting is visible). Here's a mosaic I took last week using this combination. BTW, the scope, camera, and tracking mount I use cost a total of just under $1000 US.



Could you share more on how you made this mosaic? Other than an adapter for the webcam, did you need anything very special? What software did you use, and were there any non-transparent steps (e.g., removal of aberrations due to vignetting, etc.)?

We have a PST, and I would love to be able to use it for this kind of thing.

Many thanks!
Jeff

Posted by: S_Walker Jun 14 2010, 03:50 PM

Sure Jeff-

first, I used a very short 2x barlow to increase the image scale. Had to be very short because the PST doesn't have much back focus.
I shot 9 short videos with the DMK; each were about 600 frames long. These had generous overlap between each because the PST has very uneven illumination across the field; it's not vignetting, the problem is the narrowest region of bandpass is pretty small on the PST, so I tune the "sweet spot" to be at about the middle of the image, and simply use large overlap and crop out the areas that I don't use. Also, choose an exposure that doesn't overexpose bright regions on the solar sisk and use the same setting for all your videos; this avoids problems with overlap between frames.

After taking the videos, I bring them into the freeware RegiStax and stack the best 150-200 frames per video, and sharpen them gently using wavelets.
Next, I bring the stacked images into Photoshop (or Gimp, if you prefer) and align each frame, then cut off the areas of each I don't want to keep.

Finally, because I use a monochrome camera, I colorize the sun for aesthetics. I like a yellow sun with orange/red prominences and filaments. This last step is completely arbitrary; remember the PST looks at a narrow slice of the red spectrum (656.4 nm, less than 1 angstrom). Visually, the sun appears dark red, but the eye doesn't see contrasts well in red, so thus I colorize the image to improve visual contrast.


Posted by: Sunspot Jul 13 2010, 03:56 PM

Sunspot region 1087 looks stunning in the latest SDO images

 

Posted by: deglr6328 Jul 13 2010, 06:36 PM

I really hope NASA starts porting their iphone apps to the Android platform! I would love to have something like 3D Sun on my Samsung showing SDO data!

Posted by: stevesliva Jul 19 2010, 09:02 PM

This is neat:
http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/gallery/hotshots.php?v=item&id=2

Prominence overlaid on magnetic polarity.

Posted by: Sunspot Aug 1 2010, 02:54 PM

Incredible magnetic structures in sunspot 1092 from SDO



 

Posted by: eoincampbell Aug 2 2010, 12:50 AM

A veritable Sunday treat...! Imagery is surreal

Posted by: PDP8E Aug 3 2010, 04:47 PM

Aurora Tonight (Aug 3/4) ... well maybe!
The CMEs of August 1st are heading for the Earth

See:
http://spaceweather.com/

Posted by: stevesliva Aug 3 2010, 06:51 PM

This appears to be rather more cool than some of the lower-resolution videos out there:
http://www.lmsal.com/~schryver/Public/AIA/AIA-211-193-171_20100801T000029_305s.mov

Posted by: Sunspot Aug 3 2010, 07:12 PM

Stunning prominence visible to SDO right now !!!!!! 18.30UT/19.30BST

 

Posted by: Sunspot Aug 3 2010, 07:25 PM

Liftoff

18.58UT


 

Posted by: Sunspot Aug 13 2010, 01:49 AM

I see the SDO sight have been tinkering with the AIA304 images, much better now, showing all the fine limb detail that was completely invisible in the previous version of these images. Hopefully its permanent and not some technical blip

Posted by: PDP8E Aug 13 2010, 02:51 AM

Does this mean the Aurora Lights may be on the way on the 15th
...or do only CME's do the trick?



...from spaceweather.com

Posted by: Sunspot Aug 14 2010, 07:51 AM

QUOTE (Sunspot @ Aug 13 2010, 02:49 AM) *
Hopefully its permanent and not some technical blip


Oh well, it was just a technical blip after all.

Posted by: Stu Aug 14 2010, 08:54 AM

Drop them a line, ask them what's going on. They're good people, VERY into Twitter for keeping Sun-watchers updated, so they'll be happy to answer your question I'm sure.

Posted by: Sunspot Aug 14 2010, 10:38 AM

Another very nice prominence visible right now.



 

Posted by: Sunspot Aug 14 2010, 02:27 PM

A coronal mass ejection is visible in the LASCO images.

Posted by: Sunspot Aug 14 2010, 04:43 PM

Another prominence about to erupt.



 

Posted by: Stu Aug 18 2010, 12:33 PM

Wow... talk about a "Tunnel of Terror"!

http://twitpic.com/2fvduu

Posted by: nprev Aug 18 2010, 01:43 PM

Huh. Looks more like the "Sydney Opera House of Pain" to me... tongue.gif


Posted by: Sunspot Sep 15 2010, 12:09 PM

Another major prominence eruption in progress.

 

Posted by: Sunspot Sep 15 2010, 12:20 PM

Moving VERY fast blink.gif huh.gif






 

Posted by: Sunspot Sep 15 2010, 12:51 PM

A full disk IMage at 1.30 with some contrast adjustment



 

Posted by: Sunspot Sep 15 2010, 01:47 PM

Last view.... gone now.



 

Posted by: PDP8E Oct 7 2010, 03:22 AM

..and the last few weeks of CMEs and sunspots wind down again...
This solar minimum is continuing; We just had a day with no sunspots
This cycle is like one we have not seen before.
Here is a latest representative SDO image




Posted by: Sunspot Oct 7 2010, 02:57 PM

Looks like there is an active region about to come into view.

Posted by: Sunspot Oct 22 2010, 12:52 AM

A bit of drama at last



 

Posted by: Sunspot Nov 18 2010, 11:03 PM

Bright comet is just entering the LASCO C2 field of view now.

Posted by: Stu Dec 6 2010, 06:01 PM

Good GRIEF... look at THAT...!!


Posted by: Sunspot Dec 6 2010, 07:55 PM

Been watching it erupt, amazing sight.

keep an eye on the SOHO LASCO images now.

Posted by: machi Dec 6 2010, 08:18 PM

Wow, it's like chinese dragon over surface of Sun or fire whip from Lord of the Rings monster (in first movie).
What about STEREO images?

Posted by: nprev Dec 6 2010, 09:06 PM

Correct me if I'm wrong, but if this beast collapses & produces a major flare the Earth is not in the strike zone, right? Looks like it's already rotated too far around the limb for that.

Posted by: Hungry4info Dec 6 2010, 10:23 PM

Animation from Spaceweather.com http://www.spaceweather.com/images2010/06dec10/epicblast.gif.

Posted by: Stu Dec 7 2010, 12:11 AM

QUOTE (machi @ Dec 6 2010, 08:18 PM) *
Wow, it's like chinese dragon over surface of Sun or fire whip from Lord of the Rings monster (in first movie).


Great minds think alike... laugh.gif

http://twitpic.com/3d9lsh

Posted by: ElkGroveDan Dec 7 2010, 12:20 AM

... or http://images3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20060705184554/startrek/images/thumb/c/c8/Nexus.jpg/800px-Nexus.jpg.

Posted by: Stu Dec 7 2010, 12:25 AM

(nods approvingly) wink.gif

Posted by: PDP8E Dec 14 2010, 06:15 PM

The SDO site has a new report called Global Eruption Rocks Sun. It is about the 'Great Eruption of August 1, 2010'

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/13dec_globaleruption/

UMSF posts from that day start here

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?s=&showtopic=6471&view=findpost&p=162839

Posted by: Sunspot Jan 3 2011, 06:26 PM

SDO site is back up and running now

Posted by: stevesliva Jan 8 2011, 12:27 AM

7 months of the sun:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GMfylSkJX08

Posted by: Sunspot Feb 5 2011, 07:42 PM

This is very cool

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/pressreleases/new_images_show/

QUOTE
Physicists, led by a researcher at the University of Warwick, studying new images of clouds of material exploding from the Sun have spotted instabilities forming in that exploding cloud that are similar to those seen in clouds in Earth’s atmosphere.

Posted by: Sunspot Feb 11 2011, 10:38 PM

Sun is looking very active today with some interesting flaring.

http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/img/browse/2011/02/11/20110211_082057_512_0304.jpg

and one just a few mins ago:

http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/img/browse/2011/02/11/20110211_214521_512_0304.jpg

Keep on eye on the SOHO LASCO images for a CME.

Posted by: Sunspot Feb 11 2011, 11:43 PM

CME appearing




 

Posted by: Sunspot Feb 14 2011, 11:39 PM

Sun is looking stunning right now, especially in the 211/193/171 combination images.

Posted by: Stu Feb 17 2011, 03:52 PM

Look... at... that...



ohmy.gif ohmy.gif

Posted by: hendric Feb 17 2011, 10:36 PM

I see Hayabusa has visited the sun, eh? smile.gif

(Hayabusa meaning "Falcon")

Posted by: Sunspot Feb 17 2011, 10:45 PM

A brontosaurus now



 

Posted by: Sunspot Feb 24 2011, 12:19 PM

Another spectacular flare this morning

http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/img/browse/2011/02/24/20110224_074745_2048_0304.jpg

CME too, although SOHO seems to have missed it.

Posted by: Sunspot Mar 7 2011, 08:57 PM

Yikes..check out the latest SDO image now.

http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/img/browse/2011/03/07/20110307_195957_2048_0304.jpg

And LASCO http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov//data/REPROCESSING/Completed/2011/c2/20110307/20110307_2048_c2_512.jpg

Posted by: stevesliva Mar 7 2011, 09:32 PM

Wow!

Nice of the prominence to happen in the corner where there's some extra room in the FOV.

Posted by: Sunspot Jun 7 2011, 08:42 AM

Is this one of the biggest prominence eruptions ever? WOW

http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/img/browse/2011/06/07/20110607_072533_2048_0304.jpg

Posted by: Sunspot Jun 7 2011, 08:51 AM

small animated GIF



 

Posted by: Sunspot Jun 7 2011, 09:11 AM

And appearing in the LASCOC2 images

http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov//data/REPROCESSING/Completed/2011/c2/20110607/20110607_0818_c2_512.jpg

Posted by: Sunspot Jun 7 2011, 11:53 AM

And the view from LASCOC2

 

Posted by: Stu Jun 7 2011, 01:45 PM

ohmy.gif ohmy.gif ohmy.gif ohmy.gif ohmy.gif

Good catch! Thanks for the heads up on that, I was at work so would have missed it if you hadn't let us know.

Posted by: Explorer1 Jun 7 2011, 06:28 PM

Is there a proper name for the cool secondary explosions when plasma falls back on the photosphere?
As seen here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpkXhlPIINQ

Posted by: Sunspot Jun 7 2011, 06:31 PM

I dont know... I don't think i've ever seen anything like that before, maybe its just SDO is the first to be able to observe such explosions.

Posted by: monty python Jun 7 2011, 06:37 PM

I've never seen that splashing either. What a cool (HOT) video!!!

Posted by: ugordan Jun 7 2011, 08:26 PM

Those cold gas filaments falling back and flashing up as they "impact" have got to be one of the coolest things about the Sun I've ever seen. It's like throwing sticks of wood into a lava pool. The initial shockwave was also cool.

Posted by: Sunspot Jun 7 2011, 08:30 PM

The shockwave in the AIA 211 images is probably the most impressive it looks like an expanding bubble.

Posted by: Stu Jun 7 2011, 08:54 PM

Some good gif movies on the SOHO site...

http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/data/realtime/gif/


Posted by: Sunspot Jun 7 2011, 09:17 PM

I think the STEREO AHEAD probe will have had a great view of this prominence.

Posted by: machi Jun 8 2011, 12:46 AM

Very exciting images and either very provocative ph34r.gif

Posted by: nprev Jun 8 2011, 02:27 AM

Just beyond freaking amazing. ohmy.gif To witness such titanic phenomena is a stunning experience.

Posted by: Gsnorgathon Jun 8 2011, 03:40 AM

It can't possibly be safe to live in close proximity to such a monstrous thing. Somebody should do something!

Posted by: Explorer1 Jun 8 2011, 05:15 AM

Not to worry, give it a couple gigayears and the problem will solve itself. wink.gif

Posted by: tanjent Jun 8 2011, 11:45 AM

Compared to the Earth, how massive are those "sticks of wood" referred to by Ugordan in 160?
And, where were Mercury and Messenger when the big outburst took place?
Do events like this have the ability to damage the spacecraft?

Posted by: machi Jun 8 2011, 01:14 PM

Quick comparison between size of Earth and Sun (and the eruption).


 

Posted by: Sunspot Jun 9 2011, 07:44 PM

And here's an animation of the event from STEREO A



 

Posted by: Sunspot Nov 14 2011, 03:40 PM

Huge prominence is lifting off the sun right now http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/img/latest/latest_1024_0304.jpg

Posted by: Sunspot Nov 18 2011, 08:56 AM

Just noticed this morning - do these SDO images look blurry to you?

http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/img/latest/latest_4096_0304.jpg
http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/img/latest/latest_4096_0171.jpg

huh.gif

Posted by: ugordan Nov 18 2011, 09:31 AM

They look upsampled to me. Eyeballing it, I'd say the original frames were 4x4 binned.

Posted by: Sunspot Nov 18 2011, 09:41 AM

But this image, which is a composite, seems ok. weird

http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/img/latest/f_304_211_171.jpg

Posted by: ugordan Nov 18 2011, 09:44 AM

It doesn't look "ok" to me, I see huge data gaps in certain bands. Obviously some bandwidth/downlink issues.

Posted by: Sunspot Nov 18 2011, 05:46 PM

This one seems ok to me though http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/img/latest/f_211_193_171.jpg I don't see anything on the website to say they have changed the images.

Posted by: Adam Hurcewicz Nov 19 2011, 09:05 AM

QUOTE (Sunspot @ Nov 18 2011, 09:56 AM) *
Just noticed this morning - do these SDO images look blurry to you?

http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/img/latest/latest_4096_0304.jpg
http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/img/latest/latest_4096_0171.jpg

huh.gif


To me, yes. It's look blurry.

Posted by: Stu Feb 21 2012, 02:36 PM

SDO following a "lunar transit" right now... GORGEOUS views...

http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data


Posted by: Adam Hurcewicz Feb 29 2012, 12:40 PM

Hi, I combine colour image from today images. I use FITS 1024x1024px AIA 304 ( R ) AIA 171 ( G ) and AIA 211 ( B )


Posted by: Stu Apr 16 2012, 07:52 PM

Wow... major eruption earlier this evening...


Posted by: Pando Sep 5 2012, 02:04 AM

This has got to be the most amazing image of the Sun I have ever seen.

http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a010000/a011000/a011095/Crop_304.jpg

Link to story and video:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sunearth/news/News090412-filament.html
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/09/05/solar_filament_video/

"Last Friday the Sun put on a magnificent display, ejecting a massive solar filament that was captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in all its glory."

Posted by: Tom Dahl Sep 5 2012, 02:32 AM

Wow, that is an awesome image! Thank you very much for posing it. Now Hollywood special effects houses have something to aspire to. smile.gif

Posted by: Airbag Apr 17 2013, 03:17 PM

Today's http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/ show the solar disk http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/img/browse/2013/04/17/20130417_144528_1024_0131.jpg, and in different locations http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/assets/img/browse/2013/04/17/20130417_141428_1024_0131.jpg. I have never seen that before and I check almost every day. Perhaps some pointing issue?

Airbag

PS Some stunning flares/prominences, BTW!

Posted by: djellison Apr 17 2013, 05:56 PM

Looks like very ordinary, regular flat-field maneuvers. They've done them many many times in the past.

Confirmed...

QUOTE (@NASA_SDO)
We are doing calibrations so our data looks a little off center right now! http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data


https://twitter.com/NASA_SDO/status/324554290259709953

Posted by: Airbag Apr 17 2013, 06:32 PM

Ah thanks, good to know! I guess I just never happened to look at the web page when they were doing that before.

Airbag

Posted by: Ant103 May 23 2013, 09:01 PM

I managed to reprocess some frames grabbed from the 13th of May, in the morning (about 6:00 AM GMT), with 131 and 171 filters smile.gif.

http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2013/143/7/a/solar_beauty_by_skyrings-d66b4t0.jpg

Posted by: nprev May 23 2013, 09:57 PM

ohmy.gif ...stunning. Can you make a wallpaper version, Damia?

Posted by: Ant103 May 23 2013, 10:45 PM

Yep smile.gif

http://www.db-prods.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/20130513_061532_4096_0304_171_composite_.jpg

Posted by: Airbag Dec 21 2013, 02:37 PM

A really http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a010000/a011300/a011385/ was released a couple of days ago on the NASA Goddard website, showing the Sun in multiple SDO filters at the same time.

Airbag

Posted by: Adam Hurcewicz Jul 26 2017, 07:50 PM

Hi
I can't open FITS images from SDO. I try NASA view, Fitswork, Maxim DL and nothing sad.gif

Images are from http://sdowww.lmsal.com/suntoday_v2/
and http://jsoc.stanford.edu/ajax/lookdata.html

Posted by: Adam Hurcewicz Aug 25 2017, 04:28 PM

QUOTE (Adam Hurcewicz @ Jul 26 2017, 09:50 PM) *
Hi
I can't open FITS images from SDO. I try NASA view, Fitswork, Maxim DL and nothing sad.gif

Images are from http://sdowww.lmsal.com/suntoday_v2/
and http://jsoc.stanford.edu/ajax/lookdata.html



So guys, you can open this FITS ?

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