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MASCOT landing on Ryugu, 3 October 2018
Hungry4info
post Aug 25 2019, 03:28 AM
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There are some images from MASCOT at the following website, showing the area that we have seen before, but at four different times of day.
https://mascot.cnes.fr/fr/les-premieres-pho...yugu-par-mascot

At first I was having a hard time connecting surface features but then I realised that MASCOT moved a bit between the late morning and noon images. This is confirmed in the Science paper posted yesterday (23 August 2019).
QUOTE
On the morning of the third day, the lander slipped ~5 cm sideways by executing a mini-move to enable stereo imaging for photogrammetric analysis, reaching a third location (MP3)


I've constructed a 3D anaglyph and a black-and-forth .gif that shows the move, and the 3D perspective of the surface. The 3D image is kinda crude, admittedly.
(Edit: Added a cropped .gif that shows less, of course, but should help look less like a light-switch as that seems to mess with one's mind after a bit)
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Hungry4info
post Aug 25 2019, 04:10 AM
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Similar in theme to my last post. This animation blinks between the Noon image and the Late Afternoon image, showing differences in illumination angle. It looks like the lander has slid a bit between these two images as well, and I'm pretty confident it is not an artifact of the changes in lighting angle.
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Marcin600
post Aug 26 2019, 11:24 PM
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Beautiful photos!
This article is also interesting (22 August 2019) with a handful of photos from MASCOT, including this famous picture, which we all waited for. I took out a few of them (Credit: MASCOT / DLR / JAXA).

PS. In the article, informative descriptions are visible under the photos in the Fullscreen option
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Marcin600
post Aug 26 2019, 11:30 PM
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QUOTE (Hungry4info @ Aug 25 2019, 06:10 AM) *
Similar in theme to my last post. This animation blinks between the Noon image and the Late Afternoon image, showing differences in illumination angle. It looks like the lander has slid a bit between these two images as well, and I'm pretty confident it is not an artifact of the changes in lighting angle.


I think that in microgravity on Ryugu, every smallest movement of scientific instruments inside the lander generates small corps shifts


(„... at 10 kilograms, MASCOT experienced a gravitational force of 0.17 grams on Ryugu...”)
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Marcin600
post Aug 26 2019, 11:54 PM
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In the cited article there is also an interesting reference to the discussion about dust (or rather its lack) on the surface of Ryugu, which I initiated on this forum a few months ago:

"...Ralf Jaumann and his team were particularly surprised by the lack of dust: "Ryugu's entire surface is littered with boulders, but we have not discovered dust anywhere. It should be present, due to the bombardment of the asteroid by micrometeorites over billions of years, and their weathering effect. However, as the asteroid has very low gravity – only one-sixtieth of that experienced on Earth’s surface – the dust has either disappeared into cavities on the asteroid or has escaped into space. This gives an indication of the complex geophysical processes occurring on the surface of this small asteroid...”
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Marcin600
post Aug 27 2019, 12:08 AM
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And another quote from the same article is particularly interesting for metorite collectors:

"...Until now, the MASCOT scientists believed that Ryugu was similar to two meteorites that fell to Earth in 1969 in Allende, Mexico, and Murchison, Australia. However, those meteorites barely contain bright particles, probably due to the weathering effect of water in the crystal grid of these minerals. The bright inclusions that have now been observed have led the scientists to conclude that Ryugu's cauliflower-like rocks bear greater similarities to meteorites from Tagish Lake. On 18 January 2000, hundreds of small meteorites rained down on Earth following the explosion of a large fireball over Canada, and numerous fragments were found on the ice of the frozen lake.

These are very rare stony meteorites from what is referred to as the CI chondrite class. The C stands for the chemical element carbon, and the I for the similarity with the Ivuna meteorite found in Tanzania. They are among the oldest and most primitive components of the Solar System, remnants of the first solid bodies to be formed in the primordial solar nebula..."
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Marcin600
post Aug 27 2019, 12:46 AM
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I added the scale bar according to the original description under the color picture
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Marcin600
post Aug 27 2019, 01:05 AM
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A little play with a changing perspective in this crazy but beautiful world
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Marcin600
post Aug 27 2019, 01:23 AM
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QUOTE (Marcin600 @ Aug 27 2019, 02:46 AM) *
I added the scale bar according to the original description under the color picture




I'm afraid, however, that my scale bar is incorrect!!!

Does anyone know how to calculate it correctly?
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Marcin600
post Aug 27 2019, 01:33 AM
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I just found the right reference

Now the scale is OK rolleyes.gif

Sorry about that!
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Marcin600
post Aug 27 2019, 01:53 AM
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And yet only a larger version (b/w) of the night picture of the surface of Ryugu (from here )
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