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Nasa announces new rover mission to Mars in 2020
Explorer1
post Feb 14 2017, 08:54 PM
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2018 is the Insight launch; this rover is locked in for 2020. The only other mission on schedule for next year is Red Dragon (I'm assuming there have been no delays).
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Phil Stooke
post Feb 14 2017, 10:28 PM
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My understanding - second hand, I don't have a direct line to SpaceX - is that 2018 is "off the table" now for Red Dragon. Too much other stuff going on. That gives them more time to get some instruments or experiments added to it.



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PhilipTerryGraha...
post Feb 15 2017, 06:31 AM
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QUOTE (Julius @ Feb 13 2017, 07:12 PM) *
My main concern is the numerous sand dunes which could render the movement of the rover across the crater floor somewhat difficult up to the the delta river deposit.


Hrmmm... how would one compare the dunes near the delta to the ones traversed by Curiosity in Gale crater?


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vjkane
post Feb 16 2017, 08:55 PM
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Jezero Crater and NE Syrtis are only about 50 km apart. Does anyone know if there's been an analysis of whether in an a long extended mission, the rover could go from one to another?


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Explorer1
post Feb 16 2017, 10:01 PM
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Oppy got to 44 kilometres two weeks ago, so not impossible. RTGs would start to decay after a while though limiting power in a few solar panels are immune to...

Another issue is this is a sample return mission, and if caches are scattered all over, future missions would have to replicate the traverse. Or else using up all the tubes at one location, and just using the onboard remote sensing instruments at the other. Not exactly optimal!
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vjkane
post Feb 17 2017, 07:02 AM
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QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Feb 16 2017, 02:01 PM) *
Oppy got to 44 kilometres two weeks ago, so not impossible. RTGs would start to decay after a while though limiting power in a few solar panels are immune to...

Another issue is this is a sample return mission, and if caches are scattered all over, future missions would have to replicate the traverse. Or else using up all the tubes at one location, and just using the onboard remote sensing instruments at the other. Not exactly optimal!

I presume that if something like this happened, the prime mission including sample caching would be completed in the primary site before heading for any secondary sites.

There may also be many interesting sites between the two primary sites. I expect that neither of the teams proposing either of these sites will talk about extended missions, but will instead focus on the advantage of their preferred site. That said, the team proposing the Columbia Hills site is discussing extended mission possibilities. I believe that this may be because the diversity of science in the Columbia Hills is less than at the other sites.


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Roby72
post Mar 16 2017, 11:53 PM
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Mars 2020 rover still under strong support:

https://spaceflightnow.com/2017/03/16/trump...l-partnerships/

Robert
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