IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

57 Pages V  « < 55 56 57  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Mission: Hayabusa 2
Paolo
post Jul 28 2020, 09:44 AM
Post #841


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1700
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43° 35' 53" N 1° 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



more information on the extended mission is available in the latest English press release
http://www.hayabusa2.jaxa.jp/enjoy/materia...2_ver14_en2.pdf
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
stevesliva
post Jul 28 2020, 04:41 PM
Post #842


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1446
Joined: 14-October 05
From: Vermont
Member No.: 530



QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Jul 22 2020, 11:43 AM) *
Looks like an interesting decision to make: a trajectory with a longer travel time to the rendezvous but another asteroid flyby in the meantime, or a shorter flight time but including a Venus flyby.
Either way, these rocks are absolutely tiny (Half the size of the ISS), definitely the smallest objects ever visited by a spacecraft (including the Didymos moon). Exciting!


Sample return same for either -- Dec 2020. The options are EVEEA: Venus (2024) Asteroid (2029) --or-- EAEEA: Asteroid (2026) Earth (2028) Asteroid (2031)

So not all the earth swingbys are mentioned in either proposal.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Marcin600
post Aug 18 2020, 10:52 PM
Post #843


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 164
Joined: 14-December 15
Member No.: 7860



During July 25 talk event “From the scene of Hayabusa 2" (Hamagin Space Science Center) Mr. Takahisa Saeki, project engineer of Hayabusa 2, was talking about collision device (SCI) and artificial crater.

The event is recordet on YouTube (in Japanese) - here

Cool video from SCI ground tests (fragment of the presentation: 30:49-31:07):
© JAXA

Attached File(s)
Attached File  SCI_impact_test.mp4 ( 2.48MB ) Number of downloads: 221
 
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Hungry4info
post Aug 19 2020, 02:52 AM
Post #844


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1199
Joined: 26-July 08
Member No.: 4270



I don't mean to be that guy but... are you sure this is a real video?


--------------------
-- Hungry4info (Sirius_Alpha)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Marcin600
post Aug 19 2020, 01:22 PM
Post #845


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 164
Joined: 14-December 15
Member No.: 7860



QUOTE (Hungry4info @ Aug 19 2020, 04:52 AM) *
I don't mean to be that guy but... are you sure this is a real video?

This is fragment of the official JAXA's presentation (see link above)... It's in slow motion and it's very cool, but so far I didn't suspect that there might be something wrong with it. And now I have some doubts. (but I'm not a video specialist)
Why do you think it's not real? Do you think it can be some kind of computer animation or modification?

PS. To me, it looks like it was shot with a camera placed at ground level, behind the glass. The whole thing is magnified, so the soil fragments look much larger (and heavier) than they really are...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Xerxes
post Aug 19 2020, 05:13 PM
Post #846


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 16
Joined: 17-April 08
From: Okemos, MI, USA
Member No.: 4097



I don't see anything in this video that would raise any kind of doubts. They show the entire setup of the experiment, and it looks just like other high-velocity impact experiments I've seen. The Planetary Society covered the test here: Planetary Society on SCI and another angle on the experiment is here: SCI impact test
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Marcin600
post Aug 19 2020, 06:30 PM
Post #847


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 164
Joined: 14-December 15
Member No.: 7860



I think this video is cool not because it's spectacular, but because it corresponds quite well to the actual SCI impact on Ryugu (I mean the development of the debris curtain).
Of course, apart from the dust floating in the air, and the surrounding landscape...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post Sep 2 2020, 01:53 PM
Post #848


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1745
Joined: 13-February 10
From: Ontario
Member No.: 5221



According to this recently released CGI animation of the sample return ( http://www.hayabusa2.jaxa.jp/galleries/oth...Mission_en.html ), the spacecraft will take photo of the re-entry of its capsule!
Are there any scientific benefits to attempting to snap the capsule in flight, apart from practicing spacecraft attitude/camera settings?

Obviously Hayabusa 1 was unable to do the same; so unless anyone knows better, I think this would be a first in (robotic) space history (excluding the various ISS-taken photos of returning vehicles re-entering after a stay at the station)? If nothing else, I really need to update my avatar....
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paolo
post Sep 2 2020, 03:45 PM
Post #849


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1700
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43° 35' 53" N 1° 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



the only similar experiment I that can think of is Pioneer Venus Orbiter trying to image Magellan firing its retrorocket to enter orbit in August 1990. The plume was too faint to be detected.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
JRehling
post Sep 2 2020, 08:06 PM
Post #850


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2279
Joined: 20-April 05
Member No.: 321



The ascent of Apollo 17 from the Moon's surface was captured on color TV; I'm not sure if that counts as similar.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Sep 2 2020, 11:08 PM
Post #851


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 14220
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Sep 2 2020, 06:53 AM) *
Are there any scientific benefits to attempting to snap the capsule in flight, apart from practicing spacecraft attitude/camera settings?


It's analogous to the HiRISE imaging of Phoenix and MSL ( and unfortunately missed imaging of InSIGHT ) during EDL.


It's just damn cool.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
rlorenz
post Sep 4 2020, 03:46 AM
Post #852


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 503
Joined: 23-February 07
From: Occasionally in Columbia, MD
Member No.: 1764



QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Sep 2 2020, 09:53 AM) *
Are there any scientific benefits to attempting to snap the capsule in flight, apart from practicing spacecraft attitude/camera settings?


Yes, in the sense of 'rocket science'. It won't tell us anything about Earth or the planets, but emission during entry is of interest for understanding the aerothermodynamics of atmosphere/heat shield response to hypersonic entry. There have been several campaigns of (mostly ground-based, but some airborne) observations of re-entries - Hayabusa 1 (much more spectacular than 2 will be, since the 'mother ship' entered as well), I think Stardust, and some of the ESA Ariane Transfer Vehicles returning from ISS.

I was awarded time on HST to try to look for the Huygens entry on Titan (this would have been a spacecraft observation of an entry!), but the STIS instrument failed a few months before the observation was to be executed, so it didnt happen. Frank Crary IIRC got time on HST to observe Cassini EOM, but the timing didnt work out (HST on the wrong side of the Earth)

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post Sep 18 2020, 08:20 PM
Post #853


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1745
Joined: 13-February 10
From: Ontario
Member No.: 5221



It appears that 1998 KY26 is the final target.
The illustration comparing it with Hayabusa 2 in this release really gives a sense of scale
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

57 Pages V  « < 55 56 57
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 22nd September 2020 - 02:35 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.