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Uranus System Imaging
machi
post Dec 14 2009, 10:18 AM
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I finished my first good image of Uranus.
Planet is colorized from three filtered images (orange, green, blue).
Slightly brownish color of rings is entirely artificial.
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Hungry4info
post Dec 14 2009, 01:44 PM
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That's pretty neat, ^.^, though the rings look a bit bright =o.


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machi
post Dec 15 2009, 05:08 PM
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Yes, rings look bright, because their brightness is enhanced.
Rings are in fact barely visible.
Original exposition times were 15.36 s for rings images (clear filter) and 0.72 (blue filter), 1.44 (green filter), 5.76 (orange filter) for Uranus images.
Despite of these exp. times, rings were still very dark (much darker than Uranus).


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machi
post Jan 7 2010, 06:14 PM
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Probably highest resolution image of Uranus with some details (~12 km/pix).
Color from green, violet and synthetised images.
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antipode
post Jan 8 2010, 09:53 AM
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Hey thats very nice! Has this dataset been ignored because it was assumed nothing much could be squeezed out of it?

P
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machi
post Jan 8 2010, 05:23 PM
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Possibly. But I think, that lots of information is still hidden in these images. And for long time, these are best images of Uranus. sad.gif


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tedstryk
post Jan 8 2010, 06:41 PM
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Great work! I have always focused on the moons, never the planet.


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antipode
post Jan 9 2010, 09:27 PM
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Ever since the original data was released, it always seemed to me that the response was 'big bland boring ball......oooh look at that pretty Miranda over there!' Now that the planet has gone through equinox and we have Hubble and Keck etc, we know better, but still the popular assumption is that the planet is just a big featureless fuzzy ball.

Given that you are right, and that we are likely to see Neptune close up (Argo?) before we see Uranus close up, I for one am very interested in what you find in this dataset. Maybe with a bit of suitable processing it will surprise us all!

P
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elakdawalla
post Jan 9 2010, 09:59 PM
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If you haven't seen it, you should check out Bjorn Jonsson's version of a Voyager Uranus image, posted with lots of his comments about processing. The key thing of interest in reply to antipode's post is that he found no features in the images that were significant enough to make it worthwhile to rotate the three frames in 3D space to align them before creating the color composite.

Also, regardless of whether Argo is selected, I think Neptune will be visited again before Uranus, because of Triton.


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Bjorn Jonsson
post Jan 9 2010, 10:28 PM
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QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Jan 9 2010, 09:59 PM) *
If you haven't seen it, you should check out Bjorn Jonsson's version of a Voyager Uranus image, posted with lots of his comments about processing. The key thing of interest in reply to antipode's post is that he found no features in the images that were significant enough to make it worthwhile to rotate the three frames in 3D space to align them before creating the color composite.

This is different from my Jupiter, Saturn and Neptune processing where I usually rotate the images in 3D space. For Uranus I didn't see the need for that as the features are very low contrast in OR, even more low contrast in GR and not visible at all in BL.

Uranus is no less interesting than Neptune in my opinion. Being visually bland doesn't make a planet uninteresting, it just makes it more difficult to explore. Comparing Uranus and the other the other big 3 there are interesting differences, for example Jupiter, Saturn and Neptune radiate significantly more energy into space than they receive from the sun while Uranus doesn't - it radiates hardly any excess heat. And with the exception of Triton, Uranus' satellite system is actually more interesting than Neptune's. Comparison with the Cassini results at Saturn would be interesting.

I have sometimes been a bit frustrated that Voyager 2 couldn't be launched a bit later (or technology developed faster) because then it could have carried a CCD camera sensitive to near-IR. The amount of visible details increases greatly with wavelength (comparing OR and BL there is a big difference) so I suspect Uranus would look highly interesting to a Cassini (or even Galileo) style imaging system in the near-IR.

QUOTE (machi @ Jan 7 2010, 06:14 PM) *
Probably highest resolution image of Uranus with some details (~12 km/pix).
Color from green, violet and synthetised images.

This is extremly interesting, possibly the most interesting Voyager 2 image I have ever seen of Uranus. Now I wonder if there are any images of comparable resolution extending further 'down' and thus showing the bright feature better...
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machi
post Jan 9 2010, 10:34 PM
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I have seen Bjorn Jonnsson's image of Uranus and in fact, I use this image as color ethalon smile.gif

Uranus or Neptune? Don't forget on Uranus Orbiter! Team from JPL (also APL?) has mission scenario within New Frontiers budget. They planning solar! powered orbiter.

QUOTE
Now I wonder if there are any images of comparable resolution extending further 'down' and thus showing the bright feature better...

Probably no one in PDS online archive.


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Bjorn Jonsson
post Jan 10 2010, 02:47 AM
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It's actually quite interesting to attempt to squeeze out some details from these images but having worked mainly on Cassini images recently the image quality really sucks. Here is a quick and dirty version of image C2682833.IMQ:

Attached Image


Some details are visible as well as various processing artifacts and noise. In particular, the concentric ellipses are processing artifacts. This is an orange filter image from directory URANUS\C2682XXX on Voyager volume 2 (the most interesting images are probably in this directory and the directories immediately preceding and following it). The orange filtered images seem to contain the greatest amount of details but some details are also visible in the green images.

Someone should probably be able to come up with an improved version of this one.
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Hungry4info
post Jan 10 2010, 03:14 AM
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QUOTE (machi @ Jan 9 2010, 04:34 PM) *
They planning solar! powered orbiter.

Lol...

How big of an array?


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stevesliva
post Jan 10 2010, 05:20 AM
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QUOTE (Bjorn Jonsson @ Jan 9 2010, 10:47 PM) *
In particular, the concentric ellipses are processing artifacts.


Pity. I was just convincing myself that the second ring was hexagonal.
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Stefan
post Jan 10 2010, 02:35 PM
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QUOTE (Bjorn Jonsson @ Jan 10 2010, 03:47 AM) *
Someone should probably be able to come up with an improved version of this one.

Here's my take on that image (WAC green filter image 26828.33):

Attached Image


I think the only real feature is that bunch of clouds at the bottom.
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