IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

28 Pages V  « < 15 16 17 18 19 > »   
Closed TopicStart new topic
Sol 90+, Extended mission
HughFromAlice
post Sep 23 2008, 09:39 AM
Post #241


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 237
Joined: 22-December 07
From: Alice Springs, N.T. Australia
Member No.: 3989



Stu - I've gotta say it - Your 3D work is spectacular. I could have almost reached through my screen into that trench and picked up that rock!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Stu
post Sep 23 2008, 03:59 PM
Post #242


The Poet Dude
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 5551
Joined: 15-March 04
From: Kendal, Cumbria, UK
Member No.: 60



Thanks Hugh, appreciate that. Here's a colourised version...

Attached Image


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Sep 23 2008, 04:37 PM
Post #243


Solar System Cartographer
****

Group: Members
Posts: 7814
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Check this out:
http://mepag.jpl.nasa.gov/meeting/sep-08/index.html

Especially this presentation:

http://mepag.jpl.nasa.gov/meeting/sep-08/P...nix_results.ppt

Which is a nice summary of Phoenix including a very nice graph of power levels over the course of the mission so far. There's a nice topographic map of the site too.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
SolarSystemRubbl...
post Sep 23 2008, 05:02 PM
Post #244


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 30
Joined: 5-September 07
From: High Bridge, New Jersey, USA
Member No.: 3669



NASA will hold a televised media briefing on Monday, Sept. 29, at 2 p.m. EDT (11 a.m. PDT). Briefing participants will provide an update of the Phoenix Mars Mission.

The briefing will be carried live by NASA TV and on the Internet at: NASA TV
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
bgarlick
post Sep 23 2008, 08:16 PM
Post #245


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 53
Joined: 5-October 06
Member No.: 1227



QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Sep 23 2008, 08:37 AM) *


Notice on the available power profile slide there is a mention of a "Lazarus Mode" which seems to imply they are going to put Phoenix into some sort
of state that 'might' allow them to 'resurrect' Phoenix in the martian spring.... The existence of such a mode implies they are not 100% convinced the
mission will end with the onset of winter.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Sep 23 2008, 08:18 PM
Post #246


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 14153
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



The Lazarus mode has been discussed for a long time. I don't think anyone is expecting it to realistically come into play, but it's just common sense to put the code in there to give the vehicle a chance were that situation to arise.

Doug
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
SolarSystemRubbl...
post Sep 23 2008, 08:36 PM
Post #247


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 30
Joined: 5-September 07
From: High Bridge, New Jersey, USA
Member No.: 3669



QUOTE (bgarlick @ Sep 23 2008, 03:16 PM) *
Notice on the available power profile slide there is a mention of a "Lazarus Mode" which seems to imply they are going to put Phoenix into some sort
of state that 'might' allow them to 'resurrect' Phoenix in the martian spring.... The existence of such a mode implies they are not 100% convinced the
mission will end with the onset of winter.


I would say "they" are 99.999999% sure it will not survive winter. It never hurts to plan for the best possible outcome...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
helvick
post Sep 23 2008, 09:38 PM
Post #248


Dublin Correspondent
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 1799
Joined: 28-March 05
From: Celbridge, Ireland
Member No.: 220



I'm pretty sure that the CO2 ice build up (which will kick in in earnest at around Sol 210 IIRC) will eventually lead to Phoenix being encased in many tens if not hundreds of kg of solid CO2. I may have been mistaken in the data I extracted from the Mars Climate Database in this post from earlier in the year but I think it is certain that the ice build up will break off the solar panels even if it is not sufficient to literally crush Phoenix. I certainly don't expect Phoenix to wake up but I'll happily eat my words if she does. smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ElkGroveDan
post Sep 23 2008, 10:54 PM
Post #249


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4750
Joined: 15-March 05
From: Sloughhouse, CA
Member No.: 197



The one thing that I wonder about, and we may never know, is the way they talk about the panels breaking off from the build up of CO2. My gut feeling is that the CO2 is going to accumulate from the ground up. Indeed the shadowed regions under the lander will likely see the first significant growth of solid CO2 and that area will likely always have more of it until the whole region is buried. That would mean that while the panels may wind up embedded in the ice, they probably won't ever be holding up a heavy load. My guess would be that any CO2 deposition on the panels will probably occur when the ground is already waist deep in the stuff.


--------------------
If Occam had heard my theory, things would be very different now.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
bgarlick
post Sep 23 2008, 11:18 PM
Post #250


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 53
Joined: 5-October 06
Member No.: 1227



Does anyone know if Phoenix has been imaged by an orbiter while its Lidar was turned on?
If the orbiter was directly overhead when the lidar was on, could the orbiter see the lidar beam or light from it?
I could imagine so since a laser being pointed straight into the camera sensor should be detectable!
If so, I wonder if toward the end of the mission when Phoenix does not have enough power to run its radio transmitters, could it
send a "I am still alive" signal to the orbiters by blinking its Lidar at them when they are scheduled to be overhead. (I presume operating
the laser takes a lot less energy than operating the UHV/VHF radios...)
Also, in general, I wonder if any atmospheric science could be done by imaging the lidar beam from orbit.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
stevesliva
post Sep 23 2008, 11:27 PM
Post #251


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1380
Joined: 14-October 05
From: Vermont
Member No.: 530



QUOTE (ElkGroveDan @ Sep 23 2008, 06:54 PM) *
The one thing that I wonder about, and we may never know, is the way they talk about the panels breaking off from the build up of CO2. My gut feeling is that the CO2 is going to accumulate from the ground up.


I wondered the same thing, and have assumed that they expect CO2 frost to form on the panels because they'll be solid surfaces below the dewpoint, or whatever the CO2 equivalent is. I do wonder, though, why it would be assumed that one they're covered in a thin opaque layer of frost, that the deposition would still weigh them down enough before the surface frost rises up...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Deimos
post Sep 23 2008, 11:49 PM
Post #252


Martian Photographer
***

Group: Members
Posts: 327
Joined: 3-March 05
Member No.: 183



QUOTE (bgarlick @ Sep 23 2008, 11:18 PM) *
If the orbiter was directly overhead when the lidar was on, could the orbiter see the lidar beam or light from it?
I could imagine so since a laser being pointed straight into the camera sensor should be detectable!

Good thought, but it doesn't work out. The orbiter must have a camera sensitive to 532 nm, which isn't too common And the beam has to not get swamped by the sensor being very broad band or the resolution being low. Good news is the Hirise blue-green channel sort of qualifies (its broad band). The possibility of detection, though, relies on the beam not spreading much. Assuming arbitrarily that the beam width is 1 m at orbital altitudes, the orbiter camera has to pass through that 1 m. There are 8000 km available to pass through in the Phoenix altitude circle. Unless I messed up my math, an orbiter would have one look directly into the laser beam every 900 years, give or take.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
James Sorenson
post Sep 24 2008, 12:05 AM
Post #253


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 647
Joined: 21-December 07
From: Clatskanie, Oregon
Member No.: 3988



How about HiRISE imaging the lidar beam at angle, and not directly over the beam?.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ElkGroveDan
post Sep 24 2008, 12:24 AM
Post #254


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 4750
Joined: 15-March 05
From: Sloughhouse, CA
Member No.: 197



QUOTE (Deimos @ Sep 23 2008, 04:49 PM) *
There are 8000 km available to pass through in the Phoenix altitude circle. Unless I messed up my math, an orbiter would have one look directly into the laser beam every 900 years, give or take.


Sounds like a pretty tough request. Almost like asking them to image a craft during EDL. rolleyes.gif


--------------------
If Occam had heard my theory, things would be very different now.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
MahFL
post Sep 24 2008, 01:22 PM
Post #255


Forum Contributor
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1221
Joined: 8-February 04
From: North East Florida, USA.
Member No.: 11



Can I just get confirmation from someone that the white stuff in this picture is CO2 frost ?
Thank you.

Frost ?

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

28 Pages V  « < 15 16 17 18 19 > » 
Closed TopicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 21st March 2019 - 04:42 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.