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Voyager 2 imaging of Triton
Doug M.
post Feb 3 2014, 10:31 AM
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We're not seeing any better images of Triton for at least 20 years, right? No currently planned missions to Neptune by anyone, and (if my BOTE calculation is correct) even the Watt won't be able to approach Voyager's levels of resolution.

Truly, this outer planets work is a game for the patient.


Doug M.
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tedstryk
post Feb 3 2014, 10:38 AM
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What is the WATT?


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centsworth_II
post Feb 3 2014, 01:41 PM
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QUOTE (tedstryk @ Feb 3 2014, 05:38 AM) *
What is the WATT?

James Watt space telescope?
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MarcF
post Feb 3 2014, 01:45 PM
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Do you mean James Webb space telescope ?
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centsworth_II
post Feb 3 2014, 02:09 PM
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Woops! Don't worry mister Watt, some day they'll name something after you. laugh.gif
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tedstryk
post Feb 3 2014, 04:24 PM
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The JWST is an infrared telescope. It won't have the spatial resolution to even match Hubble.


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JohnVV
post Feb 3 2014, 07:05 PM
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so basically
it is reprocessing the old data with NEW software on new machines that have more than a 8086 and 32 meg ram
voy2isis, voycal, isis2raw( 32bit raw), adjust min/max and gama ( 0.6) , inpaint missing data ( "resynthesizer" )

gmic pde ( wavelet ) to smooth the noise

the straight imq to png , then the orig AFTER adjust min/max and gama
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dtolman
post Feb 4 2014, 01:40 AM
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Hmmm... in the post Hubble era, will any scope be able to do high resolution observation of outer solar system objects with comparable or better resolution? Perhaps the Thity Meter Telescope or one of the other monsters being built on the ground? Or one of the donated NRO scopes?
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djellison
post Feb 4 2014, 01:44 AM
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Pre or post Hubble....physics is physics.....the laws of optics still apply. The short answer is no. The long answer is in the physics described here : http://www.telescope-optics.net/telescope_resolution.htm
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dtolman
post Feb 4 2014, 01:48 AM
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Sorry - wasn't clear. I wasn't asking if we could get Voyager level resolution, I already understood that was impossible - I was wondering what telescopes now or in planning for the next 10 years had _Hubble_ comparable resolution for outer-system objects.
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JohnVV
post Feb 4 2014, 02:42 AM
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a BUNCH of new spacecraft will need to be sent out to the outer solar system
one for each planet and some for just the major moons

[ADMIN EDIT]
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Phil Stooke
post Feb 4 2014, 04:26 AM
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Telescopes on the ground as good as Hubble - you bet. The advantage of Hubble being above the atmosphere has to a great degree been overcome with larger optics and adaptive optics on the ground. Look in this thread:

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...mp;#entry193614

for examples of Uranus from Keck. Hubble can still compete in wavelengths that don't reach the ground.

Phil

(PS now I want to see Keck image Ceres!)


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Doug M.
post Feb 4 2014, 09:00 AM
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Daaah, the Webb not the Watt. Excuse me.

A new generation of ground-based Extremely Large Telescopes will come online in the next decade. Both the Thirty Meter Telescope (Hawaii) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (Chile) are currently scheduled for first light in 2022. That's almost certainly optimistic -- but Magellan (Chile) is currently on schedule for first light in 2020. Ten years from now we should have two and maybe three ready to go. And all three of these things have apertures measured in tens of meters and surfaces measured in hundreds of square meters. (And price tags measured in eight or nine figures.)

How well they'd image a moon of Neptune is beyond my limited physics, though. Anyone?



Doug M.
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Stefan
post Feb 4 2014, 09:04 AM
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QUOTE (john_s @ Feb 2 2014, 03:53 PM) *
Yes, it's a beauty! It's also rather poignant, because it's the last high-resolution, close-up, image taken in the entire Voyager mission. After that, all we had were ever-diminishing crescent views of Triton and Neptune.

Actually, there was one more! This one:

Attached Image


I used it as the "right eye" in my anaglyph. It is not as exciting as the other one, and also more blurry.
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tedstryk
post Feb 4 2014, 07:04 PM
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This shows how the images fit together.
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
 


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