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Herschel: the first science highlights
Paolo
post Jul 16 2010, 06:34 PM
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The special issue of Astronomy & Astrophysics on the first results from Herschel is now available, with hundreds of papers freely accessible!
http://www.aanda.org/index.php?option=com_...s/contents.html


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dilo
post Jul 16 2010, 08:20 PM
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Grazie Paolo! smile.gif


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Paolo
post Aug 11 2011, 07:06 PM
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according to Herschel's twitter (ESAHerschel) they will observe comet Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova on Aug 15/16. This small, short period comet has always fascinated me since it was to be flown by "tail first" by Sakigake. Too bad contact with the probe was lost before sad.gif


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

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Paolo
post Aug 21 2011, 04:28 PM
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from Herschel's twitter:

QUOTE
Quick look analysis of the Comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova observations by Herschel is revealing some wonderful data.


can't wait for publication...


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Paolo
post Oct 5 2011, 06:54 PM
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just published in Nature: Ocean-like water in the Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2
and this is ESA's release http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMER89U7TG_index_0.html
this is one of the most amazing solar system discoveries of 2011!


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James Van Allen
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Paolo
post Sep 29 2012, 05:21 AM
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according to tweets by Daniel Fischer (@cosmos4u), Herschel should run out of coolant in March 2013 and ESA is considering end of mission scenarios. Warm observations are not possible, so one idea is to deorbit it from L2 and crash it on the Moon to perform scientific observations.


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Paolo
post Oct 27 2012, 07:29 AM
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the story has been picked up by Spaceflight Now
Scientists could aim derelict telescope for moon impact


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nprev
post Oct 27 2012, 08:21 AM
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Exciting idea; very innovative!


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Paolo
post Oct 27 2012, 11:28 AM
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funny enough: it was also one of the possible end of mission scenarios for Chang'e 2. flying it back from L2 to impact the Moon for science


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James Van Allen
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tanjent
post Oct 27 2012, 01:13 PM
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Is the hardware actually damaged by the lack of coolant? If Herschel were placed somewhere where it could conceivably be restocked with consumables at some future time, could it be returned to service? I guess the people who don't want to crash it probably envision some Hubble-inspired scenario like that. I recall though, that the last Hubble service call had to be performed before the gyros and other components ceased to function entirely. It wasn't something that could wait 100 years.
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Paolo
post Oct 27 2012, 01:57 PM
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I see at least three reasons why this is not doable:
1. unlike the HST, Herschel was not designed to be serviceable
2. you need to use fuel to keep it into the halo orbit or to redirect it somewhere else to wait for servicing. I understand that fuel remaining is not a issue now, but it will become at a certain moment
3. orbital refuelling has been carried out until now with storable, room temperature liquids (hydrazine and water mostly). transfer of cryogenic fuels has yet to be tested, not to speak of the transfer of super-cold (less than 5K IIRC) liquid helium


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James Van Allen
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Phil Stooke
post Oct 27 2012, 08:14 PM
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Paolo said "funny enough: it was also one of the possible end of mission scenarios for Chang'e 2. flying it back from L2 to impact the Moon for science"



Strictly speaking the Toutatis flyby is not an end of mission scenario. The question is, what is the post-Toutatis trajectory? I am assuming for lack of other information that the spacecraft will not get very far from Earth and its orbit will bring it back, rather than heading off into a more distant heliocentric orbit. Is there any description of its current orbit?

Phil



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Paolo
post Oct 29 2012, 02:57 PM
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some insight on the decision to crash Herschel and the possible alternatives on this blog
http://herschellife.blogspot.es/1342197754...-end-of-helium/
I would have loved the Herschel trailblazer concept: placing Herschel at the Earth-Moon L2 point to perform tests for future farside communication satellites before crashing it to the surface. unfortunately, the option was apparently deemed too expensive


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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Paolo
post Dec 10 2012, 05:58 PM
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Finally, no lunar impact http://herschel.esac.esa.int/latest_news.shtml


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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Phil Stooke
post Dec 10 2012, 07:55 PM
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Too bad. I'm hungry for another point on the lunar map. Oh well - GRAIL coming up soon, presumably.

Phil



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