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Uranus System Imaging
Ian R
post Jun 6 2015, 03:09 AM
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Look at the equatorial band of scalloped clouds!



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antipode
post Dec 17 2015, 06:14 AM
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More astonishing AO imaging from Keck II and Gemini North. This blows my mind.





http://arxiv.org/pdf/1512.05009.pdf


Imagine what the ELT class scopes might offer!

Where's that Uranus orbiter! tongue.gif
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MarcF
post Jan 23 2016, 09:57 PM
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Voyager Mission Celebrates 30 Years Since Uranus:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4827

And nobody knows how long we still have to wait until next mission to this amazing world !

http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/jpeg/PIA01391.jpg
Reason for edit: Please don't embed huge inline images, embed and link from a thumbnail. Thanks. -mod
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Bjorn Jonsson
post Jan 24 2016, 03:10 PM
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Today is the Voyager 2 Uranus 30 year flyby anniversary. Below are my recently reprocessed versions of the highest resolution Voyager 2 images of Titania and Oberon. They are from an unfinished image processing project I'm working on (Miranda, Ariel and Umbriel are unfinished and I might add color versions of Titania and Oberon).

First is Titania. The upper image is rendered from a sharpened stack of three polar maps. One additional image is available but it is too blurred to be useful for stacking. The original images were obtained on January 24, 1986 around 09:11 at a range of ~500,000 km.

The second one is from a stack of two maps. The original images were obtained on January 24, 1986 around 14:17 at a range of ~370,000 km.

Attached Image


Attached Image


The upper image is probably the sharpest version I have seen of these images. The lower one is comparable to Ted's version - interestingly parts of my version look slightly sharper than Ted's image whereas other parts look slightly sharper in Ted's version. I made no attempt to show Uranusshine on the nightside; Ted has done this at least as well as I could do.

And here's Oberon. This is from a sharpened stack of two polar maps. I could have used two additional images but they are fuzzy and would probably have degraded the final result. The original images were obtained at a range of ~665,000 km on January 24, 1986 around 08:50.

Attached Image


All of these images are enlarged relative to the original images. North is to the right (and slightly down) in all of the images. These images are not exactly detailed and really show the need for a new visit to the Uranus system. In a sense these bodies represent a 'transition' from Saturn's icy satellites to bodies like Pluto and Charon, all of which after the successful New Horizons flyby are far better explored than Uranus' satellites.
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nprev
post Jan 24 2016, 03:51 PM
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..."not exactly detailed", but stunning nonetheless. smile.gif Beautiful work.



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JRehling
post Jan 25 2016, 07:26 PM
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A world that these images remind me of, visually, is Mercury. Obviously, the compositions are radically different, but they share a quality one doesn't see (often) in images of, say, the Moon, Callisto, or Rhea, which is that craters seem to excavate both dark and light material, depending in some way that may pertain to lateral variations in composition. And that indicates something rather interesting about primordial formation processes. So, it's interesting to see that on both Mercury, which is by far the solar system's most massive body without a multi-gigayear history of volatile and volcanic reworking of the surface, and these much smaller bodies with completely different composition.
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Bjorn Jonsson
post Jan 26 2016, 12:18 AM
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Interesting comparison to Mercury. The albedo variations of the surface material are interesting, especially on Oberon where both dark and light material seems to have been excavated in several craters. The resolution is frustratingly low though and makes it difficult to tell exactly what is happening (I wonder if the Voyager 2 imaging sequence would have been designed with image stacking/superresolution in mind had those image processing techniques been common back in 1986).

On Titania dark stuff in craters is far more rare than on Oberon. However, Titania's chasm reminds me of Ariel, Charon and Tethys. Of course detailed comparisons are diffcult since Charon and Tethys have been vastly better imaged than Titania. Ariel has also been compared to Charon but even though Ariel is considerably better imaged than Titania the imaging coverage there is far worse than at Charon. We really need to revisit Uranus!
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tedstryk
post Jan 26 2016, 02:23 PM
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Sorry, I'm just finding this now. Excellent work, Bjorn. I think part of the differences between these reflect the fact that I did a little more to suppress noise, although this possibly obliterated marginal detail (but I thought it looked better). Here are my versions of these images.

Attached Image

Attached Image

Attached Image


The Oberon image is a complete reworking from scratch. Unlike Bjorn, I used all four images (though desmearing was required), and the two lower quality images are weighted as only a combined 20% of the final product.


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Astroboy
post Jun 11 2016, 04:07 AM
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A gif of the 1/23/1986 Titania phase angle coverage using violet and green frames for my fellow UMSFites. The green channel is synthetic.



Non-rotated version:

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Astroboy
post Aug 28 2016, 07:51 PM
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Not as clean looking as the first image in this thread, but here's my own quick, dirty, kinda bad take on a color Uranus with one ring. The color is OGB and the ring was exposed by stacking the OGB frames along with most of the other images from the same filter/exposure cycle, none of which were exposed for rings/faint objects (besides the atmosphere of course, which was obviously very faint out there). Since these cycles repeated as part of a movie sequence, one could technically create color ringed Uranus movies using real, simultaneously taken data.



The ring can actually be faintly seen in some normally exposed, uncombined images.
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Brian Burns
post Aug 29 2016, 05:04 AM
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Lots of great stuff in this thread!

I didn't realize how stormy Uranus could be - it's too bad there wasn't more activity when Voyager was there, or that it wasn't sensitive to IR - it would have made for some striking images.

I also hope a Uranus orbiter will happen someday, but in the meantime the next-generation telescopes should be amazing - it's hard to believe this was taken from Earth!

Attached Image


Near-equatorial waves from 2012-2014, from the paper that antipode linked - http://arxiv.org/pdf/1512.05009.pdf

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