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Chang'e 3 second lunar day of operations
Paolo
post Jan 11 2014, 01:39 PM
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Yutu alive and well!
http://china.cnr.cn/NewsFeeds/201401/t2014...514628680.shtml
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Explorer1
post Jan 11 2014, 07:42 PM
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Great news! Those 'peaks of eternal light' at the poles are looking more and more enticing as future landing spots; no tense regular waits...
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nprev
post Jan 11 2014, 09:36 PM
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Is there an English option on that site, Paolo? If so, I can't find it.


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kenny
post Jan 11 2014, 09:55 PM
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This is a secondary news source but has been reliable in the past...

Chang's 3 update - January 11

On Saturday, the sun climbed high enough as seen from Yutu to illuminate the vehicle's solar arrays and trigger the automatic wake-up of the rover. Yutu woke up from lunar night sleep mode
and established communications with ground stations on Earth allowing teams to confirm that the 120-Kilogram rover was alive and in good condition. Yutu raised its mast as part of the automatic
wake up sequence and teams began an inspection of the rover and its surroundings before resuming surface operations. Driving was expected to resume later on Saturday.

The Chang'e 3 lander is planned to wake up from its two-week sleep on Sunday in order to resume final payload commissioning and science operations.








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Paolo
post Jan 12 2014, 08:35 AM
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QUOTE (nprev @ Jan 11 2014, 10:36 PM) *
Is there an English option on that site, Paolo?


I don't know. I google translated it
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kenny
post Jan 12 2014, 09:38 AM
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Xinhua news agency says the rover Yutu has started moving again. The lander was wakened up 27 hours after the rover.

Xinhua - rover wakes up
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Phil Stooke
post Jan 13 2014, 01:01 AM
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Looking around at our surroundings a bit as we look forward to the second lunar day... here is a comparison of a descent image and the reprojected circular panorama:

Attached Image


The main craters are probably visible on the horizon.

There have been statements about driving 7 to 10 m at a time, imaging the surroundings and choosing the next drive segment.
This is intermediate between the joystick-style direct driving of the Lunokhods with live (if intermittent) TV images, and the Mars experience of planning a drive of 100 m or so, imaging, and sending data down for the planners to work on the next sol.
Presumably the ground team in China could do several of those short drive segments in an Earth working day, but I'm not sure they could ever get up to distances of 1000 m/day like that (the Lunokhod record was 3000 m in one Earth day).
The stated goal of driving as much as 10 km would require a long extended mission, it seems to me.

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Phil Stooke
post Jan 14 2014, 03:25 PM
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I spoke to soon about driving. I have now found that the speed will be about 200 meters per hour, and each "step" of about 7 meters will be based on images... yes, but clearly the hazard avoidance and route planning is done rapidly on board and not back on Earth between each imaging session. I should have seen that, but it's difficult working through these machine translations.

Phil





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Explorer1
post Jan 14 2014, 03:52 PM
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So that's just over two days to drive 10 kilometers then (assuming no science stops and taking night shifts on Earth!). In two weeks Yutu could easily break Lunakhod's record....
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elakdawalla
post Jan 14 2014, 05:46 PM
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What's your source on that, Phil?


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Phil Stooke
post Jan 14 2014, 05:59 PM
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Glurk! My original comments came from Spaceflight101, but I have lost my reference to the second source - I'm trying to get back to it but it's very difficult to do that for translated pages. I will post it if I find it.

Phil



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Hungry4info
post Jan 14 2014, 07:49 PM
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QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Jan 14 2014, 09:52 AM) *
So that's just over two days to drive 10 kilometers then (assuming no science stops and taking night shifts on Earth!). In two weeks Yutu could easily break Lunakhod's record....


I wonder how much the energy budget limits how far it can drive in a day.


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djellison
post Jan 14 2014, 08:26 PM
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Those two small arrays, but at Earth distance, rather than Mars distance, are probably putting out several hundred watts - enough to run a vehicle of MER class constantly.
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Phil Stooke
post Jan 14 2014, 11:55 PM
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Here:

http://english.cntv.cn/program/newsupdate/...15/100791.shtml

is a report on the robot arm and APXS operations earlier today. A screen in the operations room shows a perspective view of the landing site.

Here it is deperspectivised (that is a word, right?) to approximate a map view, presumably of the location of the test. I will update the map shortly.

Attached Image



Phil


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Phil Stooke
post Jan 15 2014, 01:50 AM
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Oops, here's another one from:

http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/102774/8513020.html

(4th page of that story) - a bit closer to the big rock.

Attached Image


Phil





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