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Parker Solar Probe, Take the Solar Plunge
stevesliva
post Sep 20 2010, 05:52 AM
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QUOTE (scalbers @ Sep 19 2010, 04:57 PM) *
What is being used on the shield in the solar probe design?

I was determined to find the answer to this seemingly simple question.

Judging from the document, they're hedging their bets for prototype build and testing, but it will likely be 15cm of carbon-carbon with a coating of aluminum oxide or pyrolytic boron nitride.

Page 58/146 marked as 3-42 of this:
http://solarprobe.gsfc.nasa.gov/SolarProbe+ME.pdf
QUOTE
As part of the TPS Risk Mitigation effort, two potential ceramic coatings were found that met the requirements of the Solar Probe+ mission. Ceramic materials that are visibly white generally provide the optical characteristics compatible with the proposed shield passive thermal management strategy. These characteristics are low solar absorptivity and high IR emissivity. Thermodynamic stability and chemical compatibility with C-C are additional differentiators that further narrow the list of candidate ceramics. At the end of the study, both aluminum oxide (Al2O3), commonly called alumina, and pyrolytic boron nitride (PBN) were found to notionally satisfy these basic characteristics.

Plenty more in there.
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stevesliva
post Sep 20 2010, 06:05 AM
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QUOTE (tedstryk @ Jul 19 2007, 01:41 PM) *
If it actually gets funded, it should also give us a nice Jupiter bonus.

In reading about the thermal shield, I've just noticed the new mission has a perihelion that is farther than the original plan, and incidentally an aphelion at 1 AU. So no Jupiter flyby. They dumped the RTGs that would've provided power out there as well.

A good point mentioned in the report is that by lowering the perihelion gradually with aphelion TCMs, they have time to learn to manage the spacecraft before getting closer. Jupiter would no doubt have sent it right in.
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illexsquid
post Sep 21 2010, 07:22 AM
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QUOTE (stevesliva @ Sep 2 2010, 08:45 PM) *
Actually only four instruments mentioned, but radio science isn't mentioned, so that might as well be a 5th.

The linked article mentions five instruments; the ISIS investigation uses two instruments, EPI-hi and EPI-lo, presumably to measure particles at different energies. It also discusses five investigations that have been funded, the fifth one being a project scientist that won't fly with the spacecraft. Obviously.
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Guest_Sunspot_*
post Sep 30 2010, 10:55 PM
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Guests






More on one of the instruments

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?p...rce=twitter.com

Wide-field Imager Selected for Solar Probe Plus Mission
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mps
post Oct 5 2011, 05:51 PM
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Solar Orbiter is selected as ESA's first M-class mission:
Europe to lead daring Sun mission
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Paolo
post Oct 5 2011, 05:55 PM
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selected again, you mean. I don't want to get into politics, but Solar Orbiter has been on and off several times at ESA and was first selected as a medium mission in the early 2000s...
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stevesliva
post Mar 8 2013, 09:56 PM
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Solar Probe Plus mentioned in this interesting solar wind article:
http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/scien...8mar_solarwind/

Also mentioned is WIND, still trucking after almost 19 years...
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Paolo
post Dec 3 2013, 06:33 PM
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ESA's Solar Orbiter has recently been delayed from January to July 2017. On the other hand, I have not been able to find the sequence of flybys for the July 2017 launch. Ideas anyone?
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Jaro_in_Montreal
post Dec 7 2013, 06:19 PM
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Whatever happened to this sun-grazing spacecraft concept ? ....anybody here know ?

Attached Image
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Paolo
post Dec 7 2013, 06:38 PM
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it's now known as the Solar Probe Plus, an approved (and funded!) NASA-APL mission for launch in 2018.
http://solarprobe.jhuapl.edu/
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centsworth_II
post Feb 12 2014, 06:36 PM
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Holy 2001-Space-Odyssey-caveman-thrown-bone-turning-into-spacecraft moment!

"A pigment once daubed on cave walls by prehistoric Man will help shield [ESA Solar Orbiter] an unmanned probe that will fly close to the Sun..."
http://phys.org/news/2014-02-stone-age-spa...igment.html#jCp
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gndonald
post Mar 1 2014, 12:09 PM
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There is a user of the Orbiter Spaceflight simulator currenly working on simulating both the Solar Probe (+) and the 2005 version, the preliminary models are depicted flying by Venus:




and Jupiter:


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pitcapuozzo
post Apr 26 2015, 12:04 PM
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QUOTE (Paolo @ Dec 3 2013, 08:33 PM) *
ESA's Solar Orbiter has recently been delayed from January to July 2017. On the other hand, I have not been able to find the sequence of flybys for the July 2017 launch. Ideas anyone?


It has just been delayed from Jul 2017 to Oct 2018. The decision to postpone the launch was taken in order to ensure that all of the spacecraft’s scientific goals will be achieved, with all the system’s components adequately tested prior to sending the spacecraft to the launch site.

According to this paper (it refers to a Sep 2018 launch window, however I think it will be the same for Oct 2018):

The transfer phase for this mission profile begins with a launch in September 2018, with an escape velocity from the Earth of 3.66 km/s and declination of the escape velocity of –41.5°. About 5 months after launch, a Venus GAM with a pericentre height of more than 11000 km places the spacecraft in a trajectory towards the Earth. An Earth GAM 10 months later puts the spacecraft into an orbit such that another Earth GAM occurs 22 months later. 2 months after the last Earth swing-by the spacecraft arrives at Venus with a hyperbolic velocity of 19.3 km/s. A sequence of resonances 1:1-1:1-4:3-3:2-3:2 is then performed at Venus during the science phase such that the solar inclination is gradually raised up to the final maximum value of 34°. The design of this sequence of resonances has been driven by the minimization of the maximum length of communications interruption due to safe mode during solar conjunctions. A first 4:3 resonance like in the January 2017 mission profile, while more attractive in terms of science, would exceed the limit of the current spacecraft design. The perihelion distance therefore rises slightly during the two 1:1 resonant orbits and drops below 0.3 AU for the 4:3 and the first 3:2 resonant orbits. The first perihelion within this distance occurs 4.6 years after launch. The maximum solar latitude is reached 7.6 years after launch. The characteristics of the September 2018 mission profile are summarized in Table 4.
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Explorer1
post May 30 2017, 08:53 PM
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New announcement tomorrow on Solar Probe Plus:

http://www.space.com/37023-solar-probe-plu...nt-webcast.html
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algorimancer
post Jun 1 2017, 09:15 PM
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Looking over the details of this mission, and contemplating the current mission finale for Cassini, I'm left wondering about the mission finale for the Parker Solar Probe. Perhaps a final orbit aimed at skimming the solar surface, and transmitting data until the vehicle dies? In the interim, perhaps crank-up the inclination during mission extension so that we get some polar views of the sun like we're getting from Jupiter by the Juno probe?

Yes, I know, it is still way to early to worry about this sort of thing smile.gif

Oh, and why no ion propulsion? I would have thought this would be the ideal mission for that, in terms of solar power. But it seems to do okay with Venus slingshots.
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