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Irregular Mare Patches on the Moon
John Moore
post May 13 2019, 01:24 PM
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Considered to be volcanic in nature, IMPs Irregular Mare Patches are surely the most odd-looking, geological features found on the lunar surface today.

Generally located near the basaltic plains (the Maria) on the nearside moon, and ranging in diameters from ~ 800 metres downwards (with only a few reaching kilometres in scale), their hummocky and sometimes 'mound-like' floors not only pose questions about how exactly they formed, but more importantly of all, is the issue surrounding their actual age.

This latter point, in fact, has proved controverscial: splitting the community in half; some workers proposing that they are billions of years old, others saying that they formed within the last 100 million years or so.

Volcanism on the Moon is believed to have ended some ~ 3.6 billions years ago, so the division in opinions to their actual age has serious ramifications not only for them being as, potentially young, or old, individual features, but as an historical record, time-reference to when the Moon actually formed.

Presented through use of up to 300 LROC and NAC images under differently-lighted views, as well as additional information (lat/long coordinates, location-marked views, over 100 additional images etc.,) about each, this book should serve as a useful resource and reference to the extraordinary features that are IMPs (two samples below).

Previous works: Craters of the Near Side Moon, Features of the Near Side Moon (Second Edition) and Craters of the Far Side Moon.

John Moore
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John Moore
post May 27 2019, 10:07 AM
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Thanks, nprev…I suspect these small features will return big answers about volcanism on the Moon.

John
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