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New Horizons In The Asteroid Belt, Summer - Autumn 2006
SFJCody
post Feb 6 2006, 04:50 PM
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Will there be any serendipitous asteroid passes?
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ugordan
post Feb 6 2006, 05:07 PM
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QUOTE (SFJCody @ Feb 6 2006, 05:50 PM)
Will there be any serendipitous asteroid passes?
*

More importantly, will there be any such passes *after* the optical instruments are commissioned, several months after launch?


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john_s
post Feb 6 2006, 05:11 PM
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QUOTE (SFJCody @ Feb 6 2006, 04:50 PM)
Will there be any serendipitous asteroid passes?
*


According to the latest tabulation, the closest approach to a known asteroid will be to the 2 km object 1999 JV26, which we pass on April 19th at a range of 1.3 million km. No asteroids will get bigger than 1.2 LORRI pixels.
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SFJCody
post Feb 6 2006, 05:56 PM
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QUOTE (john_s @ Feb 6 2006, 05:11 PM)
According to the latest tabulation, the closest approach to a known asteroid will be to the 2 km object 1999 JV26, which we pass on April 19th at a range of 1.3 million km.  No asteroids will get bigger than 1.2 LORRI pixels.
*



Hmm... right on the inner edge of the belt.
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stevesliva
post Feb 17 2006, 03:26 AM
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I don't suppose NH will pass close enough to the the Lagrange point of Neptune to find any new Trojans?
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JRehling
post Feb 17 2006, 06:48 AM
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QUOTE (stevesliva @ Feb 16 2006, 07:26 PM) *
I don't suppose NH will pass close enough to the the Lagrange point of Neptune to find any new Trojans?


NH will certainly be well off the orbital plane by the time it has covered so much of the leg between Jupiter and Pluto. Even if the trajectory were perfect in two dimensions, it'll be off in that one.
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YesRushGen
post Feb 17 2006, 07:45 PM
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QUOTE (john_s @ Feb 6 2006, 12:11 PM) *
According to the latest tabulation, the closest approach to a known asteroid will be to the 2 km object 1999 JV26, which we pass on April 19th at a range of 1.3 million km. No asteroids will get bigger than 1.2 LORRI pixels.


Just as an excercise, I wonder what magnitude of deltaVs would be required to (a) place NH on a course for a close flyby of JV26 and (b) restore the Jovian aimpoint after the flyby.

best,

Kelly
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stevesliva
post Feb 17 2006, 09:10 PM
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As for being above the plane, yes, but my mind was basically wandering along the lines of:

If there is a sphere around NH in the outer solar system in which Lorri would substantially exceed the resolution of ground-based telescopes, does this sphere ever include interesting regions of space such as the langrange points of any gas giant...

But no doubt the field of view isn't large enough to really work well in surveying large regions of emptiness.
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punkboi
post Feb 21 2006, 02:26 AM
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According to Alan Stern in an interview on Planetary Radio, New Horizons will have a distant encounter with a Centaur in 2010.


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Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post Feb 23 2006, 05:52 PM
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QUOTE (punkboi @ Feb 21 2006, 02:26 AM) *
According to Alan Stern in an interview on Planetary Radio, New Horizons will have a distant encounter with a Centaur in 2010.

Yes, I have to say that that was a good interview with Alan.
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lyford
post Feb 24 2006, 12:07 AM
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If I heard right, that "encounter" will be at a distance of 2.5 to 2.8 AU... but what's a couple hundred million miles between friends? Still that's a lot closer than we are right now.... biggrin.gif


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"Zis is not nuts, zis is super-nuts!" Mathematician Richard Courant on viewing an Orion test
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stevesliva
post May 5 2006, 05:23 AM
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QUOTE (stevesliva @ Feb 16 2006, 10:26 PM) *
I don't suppose NH will pass close enough to the the Lagrange point of Neptune to find any new Trojans?

Apparently they *are* hoping for some Neptunian trojans to pop into view in 2014!
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/overview/piPerspec..._5_1_2006_2.php
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post May 5 2006, 04:45 PM
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Asteroid belt passage ... anyway no problem in the Kirkwood gaps biggrin.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif
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Guido
post May 26 2006, 12:45 PM
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The Asteroid belt falls roughly between 2.06 and 3.27 AU (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asteroid_belt )
As for today New Horizons is 2.24 AU from the sun, so already entered the Asteroid belt some time ago.
Still 1.03 AU to go. Assuming the flight path makes an angle of 45 with the orbits (from New Horizons Current Position http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/mission/whereis_nh.php ) means New Horzions has to travel another 1.46 AU before it leaves the Asteroid belt.
This means, at an average speed of 28.64 km/sec, another 88 days inside the belt. Till august 22nd.
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Guido
post Aug 21 2006, 07:41 PM
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See http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/news_center/news/081706.html
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