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Voyager Mission Operations Status Reports, Where'd they go?
stevesliva
post Aug 28 2017, 05:58 PM
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As of now, the 40th year since launch, the Voyager mission webpage is a fairly nice dynamic page with distance from earth/sun, mission elapsed time, and cosmic ray data:
https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status/

A few years ago, there were weekly "Voyager Mission Operations Status Reports" which included propellant consumed and remaining, and RTG Watts (Output) and the operating Margin.

They appeared to trail off around January 16th, 2015, but the Wayback Machine has them:
https://web.archive.org/web/20150427094931/...weekly-reports/

There is also a @NSFVoyager2 Twitter account that is still putting out engineering information:
https://twitter.com/nsfvoyager2?lang=en
(Such as: CCS: END BASELINE SEQUENCE B176: BEGIN BASELINE SEQUENCE B177: LOCK STAR (2017:234:012611:2T))

All of that said, does anyone know where the nitty-gritty engineering information is being published these years? And I don't care if it's weekly-- that was perhaps too high fidelity. But I'd be curious to see annual or monthly reports.
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MichaelDoyle
post Dec 4 2017, 01:18 PM
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Removed.
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Liss
post Jan 6 2020, 07:50 PM
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QUOTE (stevesliva @ Aug 28 2017, 08:58 PM) *
A few years ago, there were weekly "Voyager Mission Operations Status Reports" which included propellant consumed and remaining, and RTG Watts (Output) and the operating Margin.

They appeared to trail off around January 16th, 2015, but the Wayback Machine has them:
https://web.archive.org/web/20150427094931/...weekly-reports/


It occured to me that the archive.org set of Weekly Reports is not complete. Only years 1995 through 2010 and 2012 have (almost) full sets; only 19 statuses has been saved for 2011, 6 for 2013 and 38 of 52 for 2014.
I wonder if anybody has copies of the lost Weekly Status Reports.

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climber
post Mar 5 2020, 09:53 AM
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I wasn’t able to find the DSN topic if any. So I posted this message here. Please feel free to move it.
Time for an upgrade to the biggest Deep Space Network dish at @CanberraDSN 📡

While no new commands will be sent to @NASAVoyager 2 until ~January 2021, the team can still receive science data from the craft as it explores interstellar space.

http://go.nasa.gov/2VNhAvx


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PDP8E
post May 10 2021, 09:42 PM
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Persistent plasma waves in interstellar space detected by Voyager 1

Abstract

In 2012, Voyager 1 became the first in situ probe of the very local interstellar medium1. The Voyager 1 Plasma Wave System has given point estimates of the plasma density spanning about 30 au of interstellar space, revealing a large-scale density gradient2,3 and turbulence4 outside of the heliopause. Previous studies of the plasma density relied on the detection of discrete plasma oscillation events triggered ahead of shocks propagating outwards from the Sun, which were used to infer the plasma frequency and, hence, density5,6. We present the detection of a class of very weak, narrowband plasma wave emission in the Voyager 1 data that persists from 2017 onwards and enables a steadily sampled measurement of the interstellar plasma density over about 10 au with an average sampling distance of 0.03 au. We find au-scale density fluctuations that trace interstellar turbulence between episodes of previously detected plasma oscillations. Possible mechanisms for the narrowband emission include thermally excited plasma oscillations and quasi-thermal noise, and they could be clarified by new findings from Voyager or a future interstellar mission. The emission’s persistence suggests that Voyager 1 may be able to continue tracking the interstellar plasma density in the absence of shock-generated plasma oscillation events.

The paper is in Nature Astronomy (paywall) but the 'gist' is all over on the web in news pieces (VOYAGER HEARS A HUM...)

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41550-021-01363-7


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Paolo
post May 11 2021, 06:52 AM
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It's on arxiv https://arxiv.org/abs/2105.04000

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