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Mercury Flyby 1
Phil Stooke
post Dec 22 2007, 10:12 PM
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No, but any press release mosaics etc. could be reprojected fairly quickly.

APL does have a tiny history of daily release. Or did. Right back at the start of the NEAR approach to Eros, just before going into orbit, they said they would release all the images every day. And they actually did, while the asteroid was 10 pixels long or so. At that time I was downloading them and posting a few images on some usenet forum or some such place - whatever it was people did back then. I recall Calvin Hamilton asking me how I got the 16 bit images into Photoshop. Then he put out a few of his own. And then, just as Eros was getting big enough to be interesting, they chickened out and quit.

C'mon, APL, you can do it!

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JRehling
post Dec 22 2007, 10:44 PM
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elakdawalla
post Dec 22 2007, 10:57 PM
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In terms of when images get released, a lot depends upon the PI, and from what I understand, this PI is not likely to permit the images to get posted immediately -- though of course I would be delighted to be wrong.

Anyway, this video is the final version of the one Louise showed me in August...

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algorimancer
post Dec 22 2007, 11:55 PM
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QUOTE (ugordan @ Dec 22 2007, 09:35 AM) *
...MESSENGER doesn't feature raw image pages...

It seems to me that it is in Nasa's own interest to encourage this sort of virtually free publicity - I would hope that a plan for public data sharing would be a factor in approving funding for missions.
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djellison
post Dec 23 2007, 12:10 AM
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Outreach is certainly part of the mission selection process. However, the rapid release of raw imagery in the MER/Cassini style is certainly not 'virtually free'. Just ask their web teams how much bandwidth they get through.
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nprev
post Dec 23 2007, 02:18 AM
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Yeah...it's easy to forget that it takes a lot of labor & resources to post pics in real time. Not every mission has this.


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MarsIsImportant
post Dec 23 2007, 06:20 AM
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If we are not pushy and the Messenger team knows about this audience, then they might be willing to give us what they can. The recent animations and interviews clips on their site happened in a timely manner. It is most appreciated and helpful. It almost seemed that they are aware of us. Perhaps they are. Or perhaps it was mere coincidence because of the upcoming flyby.

We didn't expect the MRO team to be so gracious with some of the images; yet they seem to have been. I can only hope that the Messenger team will also follow the MER team example to some extent or another and make public whatever is practical to do so.
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tfisher
post Dec 23 2007, 01:38 PM
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QUOTE (djellison @ Dec 22 2007, 08:10 PM) *
Just ask their web teams how much bandwidth they get through.

If it was purely a matter of bandwidth, I would expect they could get google to host for free. (I say google in particular because they most clearly among the internet giants display the attitude of being happy to undertake even expensive projects just to advance their image of being the premier repository of human knowledge, and they show a particular interest in helping the scientific community.) Of course, there are expenses to have a web team at all.

Still I think this kind of decision doesn't really come down to money. The PI and core science team have a strong motivation to try to maximize the amount of scientific credit they personally get, and openness with data is viewed as decreasing their advantage over competing scientists. I think that is still the real story.
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Rob Pinnegar
post Dec 23 2007, 07:49 PM
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QUOTE (tfisher @ Dec 23 2007, 06:38 AM) *
The PI and core science team have a strong motivation to try to maximize the amount of scientific credit they personally get, and openness with data is viewed as decreasing their advantage over competing scientists. I think that is still the real story.

That's probably true, and a good way of addressing it would be to determine whether anyone on the Cassini team has lost credit for something because of the existence of the Raw Images page. If that hasn't happened, the Messenger team could rest a bit easier about it.

In addition, I don't recall having seen anything on UMSF that would indicate that our discussions here had taken anything away from the Cassini team. There have been a few occasions when things got posted and discussed here before they showed up on the Cassini web site, or in a conference abstract volume. These included the re-discovery of the ring spokes, and the changes in the D Ring. That didn't seem to have any really serious negative ramifications.

It's probably inevitable that, sooner or later, someone is going to try to jump the gun and take advantage of one of the Raw Images pages. But then they'd have to try to get it through peer review and that could pose problems for them. Anyone remember those guys who claimed to have found pools of water on Mars the other year?...
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mcaplinger
post Dec 23 2007, 10:56 PM
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QUOTE (algorimancer @ Dec 22 2007, 03:55 PM) *
I would hope that a plan for public data sharing would be a factor in approving funding for missions.

All missions have PDS data release requirements, and that's about it. While outreach is a factor in mission selection, it's a very tiny factor. And I suspect a better outreach plan than just dumping minimally-processed data with no explanation or commentary on the internet would be required to make it be a bigger factor.


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Doc
post Dec 24 2007, 10:14 AM
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QUOTE (nprev @ Dec 22 2007, 06:37 PM) *
Didn't forget; actually, never knew. Bummer. sad.gif


Dont despair, I believe they will post the raw images in the same way they did with New Horizons.
It may take time though.
However, if they dont release the raw images....... well, at least we will enjoy the flyby itself. :-)


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scalbers
post Dec 24 2007, 11:00 PM
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Wonder if any images will be shown at this public reception?

http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/RSVP/index.php


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gcecil
post Dec 25 2007, 10:42 PM
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QUOTE (scalbers @ Dec 24 2007, 06:00 PM) *
Wonder if any images will be shown at this public reception?

http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/RSVP/index.php


I was told by PI Sean Solomon that "The day of the flyby itself will have drama, but no data. Images and other data will not be downloaded from the spacecraft until several days following closest approach." So, Strom's talk will be a preview only. I've been invited up for some of the downlink; really looking forward to this bit of history making. From the visualization link posted up thread, you can infer that the laser altimeter will scan across the putative ramparts of the Skinakas basin (in the dark during this flyby). Of course, there is only limited radar altimetry of Mercury to provide context; the Harmon et al Arecibo images are insensitive to significant surface tilts.

Update [12/26]: Confirmed that no data will be on ground until 16th. Big data crunch 16-18, followed by press conference/release. Then plenty of people in Laurel MD for a couple of weeks of photo-geology.
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CAP-Team
post Dec 29 2007, 09:50 AM
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Does anyone know what the field of view of the Narrow Angle and the Wide Angle Camera is?
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peter59
post Dec 29 2007, 03:37 PM
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QUOTE (Doc @ Dec 24 2007, 11:14 AM) *
However, if they dont release the raw images....... well, at least we will enjoy the flyby itself. :-)


Now Messenger is 10 million kilometers from Mercury.

Power up your Imagination!

Attached Image

Mariner 10 six days before closest approach (03/23/74).
Image FDS0014342

Attached Image

Mariner 10 four days before closest approach (03/25/74).
Image FDS0019143

Attached Image

Mariner 10 two days before closest approach (03/27/74).
Image FDS0023285


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