IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

12 Pages V  « < 10 11 12  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Chang'e-4 farside landing mission
Explorer1
post Jan 15 2019, 08:03 PM
Post #166


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1630
Joined: 13-February 10
From: Ontario
Member No.: 5221



This (English) article says they were powered down for sunset (i.e. the experiment would not go past lunar night).
https://news.cgtn.com/news/3d3d414f7949444d...54/share_p.html

QUOTE
Now it is night on the Moon and the temperature has dropped to nearly 180-degree centigrade below freezing. All the equipment has powered down, and the remaining seeds and animals will be gradually decomposed down to organic fundamentals.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Jan 15 2019, 08:38 PM
Post #167


Martian Cartographer
****

Group: Members
Posts: 7754
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



OK, that's good. I had thought it was supposed to work through the lunar night with warmth and artificial light, though I know it piped in natural light during daylight. It does seem like a useful next step would be to allow longer operation on a future mission. Maybe that is more suited to polar missions, which we know are in the plan.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
wildespace
post Jan 16 2019, 11:30 AM
Post #168


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 234
Joined: 15-January 13
Member No.: 6842



What the landing site will look in early morning. High incidence angle (86.68 degrees) view from M178833263LC

Attached Image


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Jan 17 2019, 03:37 AM
Post #169


Martian Cartographer
****

Group: Members
Posts: 7754
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Attached Image


I saw this picture tweeted on the 11th or 12th and then couldn't find it again to save it. Now I found it on this site (near the bottom):

http://py.qianlong.com/2019/0116/3064840.shtml


It is from the last position on the first lunar day, looking back on the tracks from that day's drive. Does anyone have a better version of it?

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
kenny
post Jan 17 2019, 10:45 AM
Post #170


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 438
Joined: 1-May 06
From: Scotland (Ecosse, Escocia)
Member No.: 759



According to the Google image-matching search function, that is the only version of that image on the internet at the moment.
Google's best guess for the subject of that image is a River Clyde steamer ! smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Huguet
post Jan 17 2019, 01:23 PM
Post #171


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 4
Joined: 4-January 19
Member No.: 8523



Yutu 2 will have a hard time avoiding all that craters, he will need to be making adjustments at almost every meter.

"From the images sent back from Chang'e 4, we can see the area surrounding the probe is dotted with craters of different sizes, and it's very difficult for the rover to drive in the region," explained Sun Zezhou, chief designer of the Chang'e 4 probe, according to Xinhua.

"We'll try to find the relatively safe areas and make a reasonable plan for the route of the rover based on the images taken by it," Sun said, adding, "we haven't found any insurmountable obstacle in the region."
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
John Moore
post Jan 17 2019, 08:31 PM
Post #172


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 82
Joined: 22-May 09
From: Ireland
Member No.: 4792



Looks like the top-left (squiggly) tracks are those where it stopped at the crater south (classic image, well-published at this stage), the rover did a 180 deg there (and more), and from the current image,
we're still looking back southwards as the Rover travelled north after two wheel-abouts (the Lander would be to the left - some several metres away).

Have a simulated image put together of the possible track, but it would have been poor to post.

The stopped-off position of the Rover is well within the lunar night-time -175 deg C temperatures now; waiting for further activation round the 28/29 Jan 2019. Fingers crossed.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

12 Pages V  « < 10 11 12
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 22nd January 2019 - 07:18 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.