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Mission: Hayabusa 2
Marcin600
post Dec 19 2020, 08:56 PM
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QUOTE (nprev @ Dec 19 2020, 12:22 AM) *
I wonder if that's TOTAL total, or just the yield from sample chamber A? I would guess the latter.


According to this JAXA website - https://fanfun.jaxa.jp/topics/detail/17721.html :

about 5.4 grams is the sample as a whole from "Sample Catcher" (chambers A+B+C) - calculated from the weight difference of the whole „Sample Catcher” before flight and after return.

So:

5.4 g includes:
- sample in chamber A (from the first touchdown) - opened and photographed (not yet weighed)
- possible sample in chamber B - not yet opened (possibly from the second touchdown)
- possible sample in chamber C - not yet opened (rather, it should be empty).

5.4 g does not include an unknown amount of sample (not yet weighed) found at the bottom of Sample Container after removing the „Sample Catcher” - photographed (black „sand”). This sample was unexpected there (?) and is „a bonus”.

Thus, according to JAXA's calculations so far, no matter how much (or at all) there is material in the chambers B and C, the total weight of the samples from Ryugu is 5.4 g + an unknown (but small) amount from the bottom of the container.
(Well, unless there is a numerical error in JAXA's information. But it has been repeated in several places on the official JAXA sites)


In addition, an unknown amount of gas was also collected, coming (most likely) from the degassing of the sample. This gas was collected twice - in Australia and for the second time in Japan, which proves that it was still produced during the capsule transport. And as the capsule turned out to be well sealed, the gas probably comes from the sample itself and is emitted due to the heat prevailing in Earth's conditions (?) - http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/en/topics/002523.html


PS. As the mission Hayabusa2 assumed the minimum amount of sampled material as 0.1 grams, therefore 5.4+ grams means success of the mission - https://twitter.com/haya2e_jaxa/status/1339811691681308673
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Marcin600
post Dec 20 2020, 09:11 PM
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The target of the extended Hayabusa2 mission:

„The asteroid 1998 KY26 captured by the ultra-wide-field primary focus camera Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) mounted on the Subaru Telescope . An asteroid is a point light source (the position where two lines intersect) that moves to the right near the center of the image. Taken from 2:04 am to 2:16 am (Hawaii local time) on December 10, 2020.”

„...The diameter of this asteroid is estimated to be as small as about 30 meters, and it is so dark that it is very difficult to observe it from Earth without using a large telescope...”

Credit: NAOJ (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan) https://www.nao.ac.jp/news/topics/2020/20201218-subaru.html
English version: https://www.nao.ac.jp/en/news/topics/2020/2...218-subaru.html
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Marcin600
post Dec 26 2020, 02:04 AM
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from Hayabusa2 twitter - https://twitter.com/haya2e_jaxa/status/1342040309060915205 :

"The curation work for the Ryugu sample is steadily progressing. On December 21, sample catcher chambers B & C were opened and then the contents of chambers A & C were moved to the collection containers in the photo. The largest particles in chamber C are about 1 cm!"

"We have not yet confirmed the origin of the artificial object (人工物). A projectile was used during the sample collection and it is possible that this is aluminium separated from the sampler horn at that time."

my comments:
- thus the samples from the second touchdown were in chamber C, not B. Chamber B was empty (?)
- an "artificial object" (likely part of sampler horn) is indicated by an arrow in the second photo

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Marcin600
post Dec 26 2020, 02:41 AM
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additional photos from the press material - pdf, in Japanese -
http://www.hayabusa2.jaxa.jp/enjoy/materia...201224_ver7.pdf
(I enlarged and sharpened a little the last 5 photos)
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Marcin600
post Dec 27 2020, 12:44 AM
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A few slides from Professor Makoto Yoshikawa lecture at the Hamagin Space Science Center, December 26, 2020 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewMNStbw4yg...eature=youtu.be
(in Japanese, but a good drawing is worth more than 1,000 words smile.gif )

slide 7 - comparison of samples from Hayabusa2 (Ryugu - return 2020) and Hayabusa (Itokawa - return 2010)
slide 9 - construction of return capsule and sample container
slide 10 - samples from chambers A and C and from the bottom of the container
slide 11 - sample from chamber A - from the first touchdown (February 22, 2019)
slide 12 - sample from chamber C - from the second touchdown (July 11, 2019)
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Holder of the Tw...
post Dec 28 2020, 07:21 PM
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"What do you hear?"
"Nothing but the rain."
The best of congratulations to JAXA for grabbing their guns and bringing in the cat.
Boom, BOOM, Boom!
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OrbitrapInSpace
post Dec 28 2020, 10:43 PM
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Is there any information concerning the mass spectrum that was recorded on the gas emitted from the sample?
they mention a first measurement in Australia, few hours after the collection of the capsule, and a second measurement in sagamihara, before opening the sample canister.
they say both measurement gave similar information, and prove not to be terrestrial.

I wonder what was measured (mass range, mass resolution, isotopic sensitivity, ionization method...)
does anyone has info on the mass spectrum that was set-up in Woomera?
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Marcin600
post Dec 29 2020, 09:42 AM
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QUOTE (OrbitrapInSpace @ Dec 28 2020, 11:43 PM) *
Is there any information concerning the mass spectrum that was recorded on the gas emitted from the sample?
they mention a first measurement in Australia, few hours after the collection of the capsule, and a second measurement in sagamihara, before opening the sample canister.
they say both measurement gave similar information, and prove not to be terrestrial.

I wonder what was measured (mass range, mass resolution, isotopic sensitivity, ionization method...)
does anyone has info on the mass spectrum that was set-up in Woomera?

As far as I know:

1. Technique. The technique that was used to analyze the collected gas („the molecular and isotopic composition” - 1, 2) is Mass Spectrometry (MS).
[from Wikipedia: Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical techniques that is used to measures the mass-to-charge ratio of ions. The results are typically presented as a mass spectrum, a plot of intensity as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio...]

The official JAXA information is here - https://global.jaxa.jp/press/2020/12/20201215-2_e.html (and pdf - here)

I haven't found more detailed information anywhere.


2. Results. The only results of analysis reported so far are in the link above sad.gif

„In early 2021, the first details of the analysis will trickle out.” - 3

I think we will not see detailed results until the first scientific article or scientific note is published. May I be wrong! After all, the community is hungry for these results, so maybe they will throw some "partial results" in the meantime (if they have a wow effect smile.gif )
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pbanholzer
post Dec 29 2020, 04:51 PM
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2. Results. The only results of analysis reported so far are in the link above sad.gif

„In early 2021, the first details of the analysis will trickle out.” - 3

I think we will not see detailed results until the first scientific article or scientific note is published. May I be wrong! After all, the community is hungry for these results, so maybe they will throw some "partial results" in the meantime (if they have a wow effect smile.gif )
[/quote]




LPSC is only 2 1/2 months away.
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Marcin600
post Jan 2 2021, 03:18 PM
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such a little curiosity from Hayabusa2 twitter:
„"Sound of Ryugu sample in the container". The sound of the Ryugu sample is the "sound of rattling like glass beads" that can be heard about the 4th second of the video. (The clicking sound is the sound of the metal seal parts moving)”

https://twitter.com/haya2_jaxa/status/1344645373256581120
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rlorenz
post Jan 3 2021, 07:40 PM
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QUOTE (Marcin600 @ Dec 29 2020, 04:42 AM) *
Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical techniques that is used....

I think we will not see detailed results until the first scientific article or scientific note is published.


I'm going to guess that someone with a forum name 'Orbitrap' (a type of mass spectrometer..) does not need an explanation ;-)

But yes, on your latter point, I would agree - sniffing organics from space is a top-shelf science result that demands careful consideration and peer review. There would be little to be gained by press-releasing any preliminary findings.
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Explorer1
post Jan 5 2021, 10:11 PM
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It appears that the main spacecraft has started firing its ion engines again for the extended mission.
I certainly hope they double-check the onboard computer for any integer overflow (we don't want to repeat Deep Impact's fate, after all smile.gif !)
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Marcin600
post Jan 9 2021, 09:26 AM
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QUOTE (rlorenz @ Jan 3 2021, 08:40 PM) *
I'm going to guess that someone with a forum name 'Orbitrap' (a type of mass spectrometer..) does not need an explanation ;-)


Of course, I am convinced that 'Orbitrap' does not need any further explanation about the mass spectrometry.

I just think it is possible that these posts are also read by people who, like me, are not as familiar with this analytical technique...

Usually, I also assume that it is better to provide two explanations and links too many than one too few. Just in case smile.gif
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