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Voyager Enters Final Frontier Of Solar System
Rem31
post Mar 25 2006, 03:13 AM
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QUOTE (dilo @ Mar 17 2006, 12:32 AM) *
From updated solar wind speed diagram, Voyager-2 experienced a repentine increase (more than 100 Km/s) at the end of February/beginning of March.
In my understanding, transition through termination shock should produce a dramatic wind speed decrease, so this is not the case... Anyway still intriguing, because even if in the past Voyager-2 already observed speed close to 500 Km/s, now increase seems more repentine and appear associated to one of the largest ions density spikes ever observed by the spacecraft...
Any suggestion?

How bright is the light of the sun at the place where the pioneers and the voyagers are at (this) moment? Or is it completely dark there now ,please can you tell me that? Thanks.
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Rob Pinnegar
post Mar 25 2006, 06:40 PM
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QUOTE (Rem31 @ Mar 24 2006, 08:13 PM) *
How bright is the light of the sun at the place where the pioneers and the voyagers are at (this) moment? Or is it completely dark there now ,please can you tell me that? Thanks.

Well, the apparent brightness of the Sun varies as the inverse square of your distance from the Sun. Right now Voyager 1 is about a hundred times farther from the Sun than we are. So that means that, as seen from Voyager 1, the Sun is about one ten-thousandth as bright as what we are used to.

That's still about 500 times brighter than a full Moon, though. So although the Sun would look like a star from Voyager 1, it would be a really, really bright star.
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dilo
post May 15 2006, 09:35 PM
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Something is definitely happening around Voyager-2!
Last nucleon data shows that, after 10 months of caothic behavior, density dropped to very low levels; in the meantime, wind speed stopped the regular descent (after the step-up previously noticed) and started to go up and down on a hourly scale (density and velocity seems to have a complementary behaviour...).
I do not recall what exactly happened to Voyager-1 density data (any help?), but I strongly suspect termination shock is very close... or already passed!


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dilo
post May 15 2006, 09:47 PM
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Based on Solar System Simulator, Voyager-2 is only 79.6AU from Sun: considering also the unfavorable heading direction, is too early for a termination shock encounter (but not impossible, it depends also from solar activity!).
Meanwhile, it is interesting to highlight that Voyager-1 is now only 130million Km from the 100 AU milestone! Should happens at mid August... I have to prepare some champagle bottle rolleyes.gif


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Bob Shaw
post May 15 2006, 09:53 PM
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QUOTE (Rob Pinnegar @ Mar 25 2006, 07:40 PM) *
Well, the apparent brightness of the Sun varies as the inverse square of your distance from the Sun. Right now Voyager 1 is about a hundred times farther from the Sun than we are. So that means that, as seen from Voyager 1, the Sun is about one ten-thousandth as bright as what we are used to.

That's still about 500 times brighter than a full Moon, though. So although the Sun would look like a star from Voyager 1, it would be a really, really bright star.


Rob:

Any idea how far from the Sun the human eye can still see colour rather than using monochrome 'night' vision?

Bob Shaw


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Guest_Myran_*
post May 16 2006, 03:13 PM
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QUOTE
Dilo wrote: .....but I strongly suspect termination shock is very close... or already passed!


What you retold makes me wonder if that might be the case, and Voyager 2 might have reached the heliopause. Thank you or the heads up.
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ljk4-1
post May 23 2006, 08:56 PM
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Podcast Advisory May 23, 2006

Voyager: Still Going Strong After Nearly 30 Years

NASA's twin Voyager spacecraft are beaming back new information about the final frontier of our solar system, including evidence of "potholes" in the turbulent zone near the edge.

A podcast, featuring an interview with Voyager Project Scientist Dr. Ed Stone of Caltech, is online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/podcast/voyager-20060523/ . The interview includes information about the latest findings, as well as highlights from the past 29 years of the Voyagers' journeys through space.

More information on the Voyager spacecraft is available at http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/ and www.nasa.gov/voyager .

Voyager 1 and 2 launched in 1977 on a mission to study the outer planets of our solar system, and they are now on their way to becoming the first spacecraft to leave our solar system.

Additional JPL podcasts are at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/indexPod.cfm .


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climber
post May 23 2006, 09:47 PM
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[quote name='ljk4-1' date='May 23 2006, 10:56 PM' post='55471']
Voyager 1 and 2 launched in 1977 on a mission to study the outer planets of our solar system, and they are now on their way to becoming the first spacecraft to leave our solar system.


I thought Pioneer 10 & 11 were considered been the first.
By the way, Ed Stone was already there at last encounter with Neptune back in 1989. He's got to have faith in what he does to carry out the VIM (is that correct Voyager Insterstellar Mission ?) since it's apparently look less rewarding after "The Grand Tour". Hat off Mister Stone.


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dilo
post May 23 2006, 10:20 PM
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Climber, Pioneer didn't reached the heliopause because they are slower.
This is clear looking to distances from Sun, calculated by Solar System Simulator and ranked in descending order:
Voyager-1: 99.2 AU
Pioneer-10: 90.6 AU
Voyager-2: 79.7 AU
Pioneer-11: 69.9 AU
(hey, they are almost equally spaced in this moment!)
In particular, Pioneer-10 was surpassed by Voyager-1 several years ago and, anyway, now is inactive...

Thanks, ljk4-1 for the interview highlight. The words of Dr. Ed Stone confirm that Voyager entered in a new region as I suspected, but still to reach the heliopause which should be 5 AU ahead!


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ljk4-1
post May 24 2006, 06:31 PM
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Voyager 2 Detects Odd Shape of Solar System's Edge

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/0605...here_shape.html

Voyager 2 could pass beyond the outermost layer of our solar system, called the
"termination shock," sometime within the next year, NASA scientists announced at
a media teleconference today.


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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climber
post May 24 2006, 10:02 PM
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[quote name='dilo' date='May 24 2006, 12:20 AM' post='55486']
Climber, Pioneer didn't reached the heliopause because they are slower.
This is clear looking to distances from Sun, calculated by Solar System Simulator and ranked in descending order:
Voyager-1: 99.2 AU
Pioneer-10: 90.6 AU
Voyager-2: 79.7 AU
Pioneer-11: 69.9 AU
(hey, they are almost equally spaced in this moment!)
In particular, Pioneer-10 was surpassed by Voyager-1 several years ago and, anyway, now is inactive...


Thanks Dilo. Doesn't show very well in the numbers anyway.
Pioneer 10 deserve to has been the first one to be launched with an interstellar "destination" (as a by product), and Pionner 11 the second... and they will.


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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post May 26 2006, 07:01 PM
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Guest_Analyst_*
post May 27 2006, 06:39 AM
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Do you have a link to the press kit? Or a press kit etc. of any of the other encounters?

Analyst
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SigurRosFan
post May 27 2006, 09:06 PM
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QUOTE (dilo @ May 15 2006, 11:47 PM) *
Based on Solar System Simulator, Voyager-2 is only 79.6AU from Sun: considering also the unfavorable heading direction, is too early for a termination shock encounter (but not impossible, it depends also from solar activity!).
Meanwhile, it is interesting to highlight that Voyager-1 is now only 130million Km from the 100 AU milestone! Should happens at mid August... I have to prepare some champagle bottle rolleyes.gif

Yes, it should happens on August 17, 2006!

- http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/science/Vgrlocations.pdf


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ljk4-1
post Jun 1 2006, 02:46 PM
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Voyager Data May Reveal Trajectory Of Solar System

Newport Beach CA (SPX) Jun 01, 2006

Nearly 30 years after launch, the two Voyager spacecraft are still operational and returning useful data. In their early years they produced some of the first close up images of the large outer planets.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Voyager_...lar_System.html


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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