IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

14 Pages V   1 2 3 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Lunar Spacecraft Images, A place for moon panoramas, mosaics etc.
Phil Stooke
post Jun 5 2005, 01:27 AM
Post #1


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5615
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



As promised in another thread... I thought all the images from Surveyor, Apollo etc. needed another place to go than the Mars Forum.

I will start the thing off with a link, not an image. I occasionally have images in Chuck Wood's Lunar Picture of the Day (LPOD) website, www.lpod.org.

This URL:

http://www.lpod.org/LPOD-2005-05-25.htm

is my latest, a Clementine LWIR mosaic. The text accompanying the image explains how I made it. LWIR images from the PDS look useless but they can be made into very nice image strips. In most areas of the Moon they are the highest resolution images available, since the HIRES camera only functioned well over near-polar latitudes. So image junkies who want to see new scenery emerge from their computers can go wild!

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Jun 5 2005, 01:29 AM
Post #2


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5615
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



PS - did I mention I'm having the hardest time getting any work done these days...

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
MizarKey
post Jun 6 2005, 05:18 PM
Post #3


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 289
Joined: 2-March 04
From: Central California
Member No.: 45



Phil, the pages for the images for 6/2 and 6/4 are coming up with 'page cannot be found' messages...do you have any pull to get them back on track?

Eric P / MizarKey


--------------------
Eric P / MizarKey
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Bob Shaw
post Jun 6 2005, 05:28 PM
Post #4


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2488
Joined: 17-April 05
From: Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Member No.: 239



Phil:

Well done - I thought Clementine was a bit of a lost cause, with very few good images!

Have you done any landing sites? It'd be nice to see familiar locations in an unfamiliar way...

Bob Shaw


--------------------
Remember: Time Flies like the wind - but Fruit Flies like bananas!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Jun 6 2005, 07:49 PM
Post #5


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5615
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Bob - quit asking me questions! I'm supposed to be working...

I have done some landing sites... I'll post a few things later. LWIR images are in pole to pole strips with gaps between them at lower latitudes so not all sites are covered. For instance I made a strip across the Apollo 17 site to see if I could find evidence of the LM ascent stage impact. But I couldn't. But the Apollo 14 SIVB impact shows up. I also used these images to find a candidate for the Ranger 6 impact site, which is on LPOD somewhere.

Clementine had lots of good images... but it made its pics with a high sun to reduce shading, because it was intended for multispectral compositional mapping. At the equator all you see is full moon style albedo variations. But near the poles the sun is always low anyway so those images are excellent. The HIRES camera gave good results too, near the poles. LWIR looks good in most areas.

and Mizarkey - no, I have no pull. Chuck Wood is trying to do the LPOD website from a remote location and is having a few problems. But it should get sorted out eventually.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Jun 6 2005, 09:02 PM
Post #6


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5615
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



This is a Clementine HIRES mosaic of the south pole. The prominent crater is Shackleton.



Phil

Attached Image


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
um3k
post Jun 6 2005, 09:02 PM
Post #7


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 331
Joined: 2-May 05
Member No.: 372



QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Jun 6 2005, 03:49 PM)
I'm supposed to be working...
*

Aren't we all! laugh.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Jun 11 2005, 04:40 AM
Post #8


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5615
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Mizarkey asked about LPOD. They had server problems... and they are temporarily at this URL until they get it fixed:

http://www.perseus.gr/LPOD/index.htm

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Jun 17 2005, 01:12 PM
Post #9


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5615
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Here's another unfamiliar lunar scene...

Clementine long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) image strip - very heavily processed, the raw data is impossible to use, but Photoshop can unveil the landscape behind the noise.

This is Mare Anguis, AKA Angus Bay if you are in the Moon Society (no, I'm not). It's on the east end of Mare Crisium, and it's the preferred site for the Moon Society/Artemis lunar base.

Phil



Attached Image


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dilo
post Jun 23 2005, 05:38 AM
Post #10


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2492
Joined: 15-January 05
From: center Italy
Member No.: 150



SMART-1's tribute to Cassini
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/SEM4GN1DU8E_0.html
(posted image slightly out of focus? blink.gif )


--------------------
I always think before posting! - Marco -
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
tedstryk
post Jun 23 2005, 01:18 PM
Post #11


Interplanetary Dumpster Diver
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 4209
Joined: 17-February 04
From: Powell, TN
Member No.: 33



Hard to tell...depends how much of the frame that really is. Focus and clarity are hard to determine with ESA images due to their penchant for oversampling.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Jun 23 2005, 02:30 PM
Post #12


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5615
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



I don't see any evidence for imperfect focus in this image. Also it's interesting to compare it with Lunar Orbiter 4 and Clementine... I'll post something on that later. But this holds up well.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Jun 23 2005, 04:04 PM
Post #13


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5615
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



OK, here's the comparison...

Attached Image


I have chosen a small area on the NW rim of Cassini, chosen to give better Clementine coverage from the north periapsis images, with higher resolution in this area.

Lunar Orbiter 4: the new digital version from USGS.

Clementine - from map-a-planet, not raw data which would be a bit better. But I've spent too long on this as it is!

SMART-1 doesn't have the resolution of either of the others... but don't forget that this is jpegged and probably reduced from the original, which might be a bit better. More importantly, though, we are at 40 north, and SMART-1 's orbit is optimised for southern hemisphere viewing. At 40 south the resolution probably exceeds LO4 and Clementine UVVIS, and at 90 south it will be 10x better than LO4 and as good as Clementine HIRES. Plus it's got better lighting than Clem for morphological studies and will have better global coverage than Lunar Orbiter.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Bob Shaw
post Jun 23 2005, 09:35 PM
Post #14


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2488
Joined: 17-April 05
From: Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Member No.: 239



The problem I have with both SMART-1 and Mars Express isn't so much the quality of the data, so much as the *quantity*. ESA's miserly approach to image release compares s-o-o-o unfavourably with the situation in the US!

(sigh)


--------------------
Remember: Time Flies like the wind - but Fruit Flies like bananas!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Jun 23 2005, 09:45 PM
Post #15


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5615
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Yes, Bob, you're right.

I forgot to mention, about my previous post... the Lunar Orbiter image is presented at full resolution. The other two are enlarged to match it. Some of the apparent fuzziness in the SMART-1 image is caused by my enlargement of it.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

14 Pages V   1 2 3 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 22nd August 2014 - 05:52 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.