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Future Venus Missions
Ulysses
post Oct 7 2009, 05:38 PM
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Some news from the BBC:

QUOTE
Densely clouded in acid-laden mist, Venus used to be the Soviet Union's favourite target for planetary exploration.

Now, after a lull of almost three decades, Russia is making plans for a new mission to the "morning star" and has invited Western scientists to participate.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8294925.stm
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peter59
post Oct 23 2009, 10:27 AM
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Venus Climate Orbiter "PLANET-C" has new name AKATSUKI.
http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2009/10/20091023_akatsuki_e.html

You can send messages that will be printed in fine letters on an aluminum plate and placed aboard "AKATSUKI".
http://www.jaxa.jp/event/akatsuki/index_e.html


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Free software for planetary science (including Cassini Image Viewer).
http://members.tripod.com/petermasek/marinerall.html
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Hungry4info
post Oct 23 2009, 01:03 PM
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I thought they renamed their spacecraft after launch =o.


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centsworth_II
post Oct 23 2009, 05:50 PM
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QUOTE (Hungry4info @ Oct 23 2009, 09:03 AM) *
I thought they renamed their spacecraft after launch =o.

I guess that's when they will remove the quotation marks from "AKATSUKI".
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Paolo
post Oct 24 2009, 10:32 AM
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Thanks to the "exuberant" performance of the H-IIA launcher, preferred over the original M-V, Japan will launch two additional payloads in solar orbit in addition to the VCO: the Ikaros solar sail and the UNITEC-1 engineering test


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

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Paolo
post Nov 26 2009, 07:44 PM
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A few updates on Venera D from the Lavochkin site (in Russian) http://www.laspace.ru/rus/news.php#325


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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punkboi
post Mar 4 2010, 10:17 PM
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Akatsuki (and IKAROS solar sail) launch date set:

6:44:14 a.m. on May 18 (Japan time) / 5:44:14 p.m. EDT on May 17

http://www.jaxa.jp/countdown/f17/index_e.html


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Paolo
post Sep 28 2010, 09:15 PM
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There is a nice article on SAGE in Air & Space http://www.airspacemag.com/space-explorati...den-Planet.html
no matter which mission is selected, the next New Frontiers selection will be an interesting one


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I'm one of the most durable and fervent advocates of space exploration, but my take is that we could do it robotically at far less cost and far greater quantity and quality of results.

James Van Allen
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colin_wilson
post Nov 1 2011, 01:03 PM
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Updates on the Russian Venera-D mission:

There is now a webpage (in Russian) : http://www.venera-d.cosmos.ru
An English version of the website may appear soon, but in the meantime one of several internet-based translation tools can be used.
This website still shows an original mission conception, which included a lower cloud balloon as well as a second upper cloud balloon, as well as a lander and orbiter.

A more recent presentation shows that the mission architecture has been simplified, and now consists of an orbiter, a sub-satellite, and a lander but no balloons.
http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPS...PS2011-1334.pdf

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tedstryk
post Nov 1 2011, 06:52 PM
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I recently did a write-up on it. http://planetary.org/blog/article/00003210/


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B Bernatchez
post Dec 31 2011, 02:15 AM
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The article mentions that the operational life will be about 3 hours, which is the battery life. With a better power source, could this lander survive for longer? In other words, have there been sufficient advances in materials science that would allow a lander to survive, say, a week?, a month?
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vjkane
post Dec 31 2011, 05:56 AM
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QUOTE (B Bernatchez @ Dec 30 2011, 06:15 PM) *
With a better power source, could this lander survive for longer?

There have been various suggestions for a nuclear powered lander that would essentially operate an air conditioner to cool the critical electronics. Given the half life of Pu238, the life on the surface could be long. However, I don't think that the technologies are very far along in development. None of the Venus concepts studied by the Decadal Survey, for example, were long-lived landers.


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ncc1701d
post Sep 20 2012, 10:38 PM
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How long until the technology from TanDEM-X and TerraSAR-X is used to map venus? I assume the technology would work there?
reference story blog here:
planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2011/2881.html
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machi
post Sep 21 2012, 04:43 PM
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Missions for high resolution (1-10 meters) radar imaging of the Venusian surface were proposed by multiple teams. Most active today are teams from Israel (MuSAR mission with possible NASA cooperation) and India.


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JRehling
post Sep 21 2012, 06:20 PM
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To reply to the lander posts from December, I'm linking to this thread from even further back:

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...d&pid=98136

In a nutshell, the problem for Venus landers is that innovative approaches to the heat require technological advances, which add to the mission cost and in a competitive environment, put any Venus surface selection at a disadvantage relative to the competitors. If the technology development were distributed over multiple missions that could make use of high-temperature endurance, that would be more favorable. We could have a dynamic where Venus surface missions keep losing Discovery / New Frontiers competitions ad nauseam, lacking the added support of technology for a superior science return. Note that the United States still has never launched a mission to Venus's surface (the one Pioneer probe which survived a short time withstanding).

In contrast, Venus holds advantages over most other destinations for orbital missions.
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