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The Surveyor Lunar Roving Vehicle, Plans for a rover to accompany Surveyor
Guest_BruceMoomaw_*
post Mar 27 2006, 02:44 AM
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QUOTE (nprev @ Mar 27 2006, 02:08 AM) *
OT a bit, here, but does anyone have an authoritative link to the complete history of the Explorer program? I was aware of Explorer 35, but had no idea that the series went all the way to 49...I mean, talk about an unheralded epic in the annals of spaceflight! unsure.gif

Was the "Explorer" designation perhaps the US answer to "Cosmos" in some way, at some times...?


Pretty much, where small (or relatively small) scientific satellites are concerned -- in fact it went up some way beyond that before they stopped numbering them and just started calling each one the "So-And-So" Explorer. I believe that finally started happening in the late 1970s, by which time the numbers had gotten up into the 50s. (They never numbered those whose launches failed, however -- except for Explorers 2 and 5.)
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Guest_BruceMoomaw_*
post Mar 27 2006, 07:48 AM
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Here's a site that will tell you more about them than you wanted to know. It adds numbers to ALL the satellites officially declared to be Explorers and which made it into orbit -- right up to SWIFT, which is "Explorer 83" -- but I myself stopped seeing numbers attached to them about the time of the Dynamics Explorers (#62 and 63) in 1981. The last failed launch of an Explorer (which thus ended up unnumbered) seems to date all the way back to 1975 -- and the last one before that was in 1964!

http://www.cira.colostate.edu/ramm/hillger/scientific.htm
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Phil Stooke
post Mar 27 2006, 04:13 PM
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OK, Bruce et al., here is an image from Explorer 49:

Attached Image


The images were 2160 by 512 pixels, 4 bit, compressed... and part of the compression scheme was to transmit only every 4th line and interpolate on the ground. The bright area at left, wrapping around a bit at right (this is a 360 degree scan), is sun glare. Various antennae and panels are seen, plus the lunar disk. I have not yet identified the topography. The ragged edges at right are caused by the compression scheme (buffer overflow) as in some Cassini images. This image was taken on 16 July 1973, and here it has been heavily modified from the source. I have contacted Goddard to try to find more or better images.

edit: Mare Crisium is at the top. The large prominent crater towards the bottom is Endymion. North is at the bottom.

Phil


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Bob Shaw
post Mar 27 2006, 05:06 PM
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Phil:

Have you packed your Grandmother?

Bob Shaw


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Phil Stooke
post Mar 27 2006, 05:56 PM
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Not yet. I'll pop out and dig her up this evening.

Phil


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Guest_BruceMoomaw_*
post Mar 27 2006, 08:06 PM
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You can send her COD. I'm generous in these matters.

I must say, though, those photos aren't very big on scientific content...
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Phil Stooke
post Mar 27 2006, 08:28 PM
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No, they don't have much scientific content... or any, really. They were used to monitor the deployment of antennae and to provide attitude information. But I think it's nice to see the image. If Goddard can find any more I'll post them.

Phil


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tedstryk
post Mar 30 2006, 05:13 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Mar 27 2006, 08:28 PM) *
No, they don't have much scientific content... or any, really. They were used to monitor the deployment of antennae and to provide attitude information. But I think it's nice to see the image. If Goddard can find any more I'll post them.

Phil


I have a lead...I have a reference librarian working on it as we speak.


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Phil Stooke
post Mar 30 2006, 05:25 PM
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In the immortal words - uh - word - of Monty Burns, "Eeeeexcellent!"

Phil


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Guest_BruceMoomaw_*
post Mar 30 2006, 06:12 PM
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As you say, they weren't scientifically intended, and a good thing -- that one makes the Luna 3 photos look good.
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ljk4-1
post Apr 5 2006, 01:48 PM
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Analysis of Surveyor 3 television cable after residence on the Moon

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntr..._1972012478.pdf


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"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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gndonald
post Jun 19 2012, 10:41 AM
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Apologies for bumping an old thread, but I've found two documents related to the Explorer 49 Camera system

RAE-B antenna aspect system (Report on the cameras)

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntr..._1972023806.pdf

RAE-B antenna aspect processor

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntr..._1972024523.pdf

The attached pictures show design of the camera.
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
Attached Image
 
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gndonald
post Jun 19 2012, 10:51 AM
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This is a follow up to the previous post. The attached picture shows what the camera system was capable of when tested on Earth and gives some idea of the effect of the compression scheme on image quality.
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
 
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vikingmars
post Jan 21 2013, 01:47 PM
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QUOTE (gndonald @ Jun 19 2012, 11:51 AM) *
The attached picture shows what the camera system was capable of when tested on Earth and gives some idea of the effect of the compression scheme on image quality.

Thanks a lot : very interesting. ...And the images were obviously taken in the infrared : look at the whitish grass (above pic) and trees (middle pic) ! smile.gif
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Bill P
post Jun 3 2013, 02:58 PM
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I am new to this site, but wish to add my two cents to this discussion.

Going back to the original question. There is a brief write-up about the proposed Surveyor Lunar Rover on pages 112-118 of The Moon (IAU Symposium No. 47) edited by Runcorn and Urey and published by D. Reidel (1972). It includes some pictures. Its text is written from a science-engineering point of view rather than just an engineering view. Also there is some material in Surveyor: The NASA Mission Reports by Apogee Books on pages 136-137. It also includes some nice diagrams of the proposed Block II and III Surveyors.
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